Ferrari Life Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
This is my first post on this website. I am a huge Ferrari F1 fan but I will admit that that is not the reason for this post (I do hope to become a regular on the Ferrari Racing Forum). I am having a debate with somebody about what Ferrari dealerships use for paint protection (in USA). Neither of us owns nor has ever owned a Ferrari so I figure this would be the best place to find the answer. This person has gotten a bottle (see pic below) of a special polish that he claims is made exclusively for Ferrari. He used it on his brand new car (I wont mention the name) and claims that result was spectacular – i.e. better than anything else he has ever seen. I have not seen his car but according to this gentleman, this stuff is amazing and is a sure ticket to victory if someone wanted to enter his/her car in a car show – if you won a Ferrari, you definitely use that stuff – nothing else.

If anyone can comment on validity of the above statement and the QUALITY of the above-mentioned product I would greatly appreciate it.

Thanks,

Dmitry
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,082 Posts
i have never seen that one before.
i always use a biological colorfree wax from turtle wax and not a liquid version but one that you have to smear out (sorry don't really know how to say it in english)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
I doubt all Ferrari dealers use the same type of wax and polish. If you want to keep your paint looking nice, I would suggest going through the waxing process every three months. This involves washing the car with a dish washing soap to get rid of the old coat of wax and any surface oxidation that has occured. Next, the car should be thoroughly dried with a chamois. Then, a polish/glaze should be applied to rid your paint of any swirl marks or light scratches. Finally, a paste wax should be appled that will protect you car's finish until the next time you wax your car. Your car definitely needs to be hand-washed often so UV rays, acid rain, bird droppings, and bugs don't destroy your finish. I have heard that bird droppings can eat through a clear coat of paint in 24 hours. Also, if you really want your paint to last, you should never let water droplets dry on your paint. 90% of car owners find it impossible to maintain their cars as meticulously as this and that is why car manufacturers are producing better paints than ever before. Most waxes will give you about the same result, there are better ones, but they are also more expensive. The important thing is that you wax often to keep your paint in pristine condition.

http://www.meguiars.com/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
132 Posts
just be carefull and dont let the dishsoap sit too long. it can soften the paint.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
Yes, this is true, cars should not be washed in direct sunlight, as mentioned before, water droplets should not be allowed to dry on your paint at all if you want to keep your paint surface unblemished and in impeccable condition. Also, if your car is not thoroughly rinsed, chemical spots will appear from the soap buildup on the paint's surface. One place that soap tends to coagulate is inside of the side-view mirrors. This area, and other crevises should be rinsed thoroughly to make sure suds aren't dripping down the doors after you have dried the car. I still think that you should use a dish soap before waxing even if it is a tad more abrasive than a normal car shampoo. If you don't use a more abrasive car wash, it is recommended that you use a separate paint cleaner as well as a bug and tar cleaner if you happen to have problems with road tar and insects. Your car needs to be immaculate and free from any dirt or grime or else you will be scratching your paint as you wax your car :ex: So, why not just use a dish soap and hit two birds with one stone. Plus, bug and tar cleaners are a bit too abrasive and I would not recommend using them unless you know what you are doing.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top