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I recently bought an 86 testarossa but am totally skint and was wondering is there many other owners like me or am i just totally nuts to think i can own and keep a rich mans car?. I am also keen to hear from you owners who are wealthy and find out what it's like to own a ferrari (or two) without crapping yourself every time you take it out in case it breaks down.I am 30 years old with ayoung family and all my life i wanted to own a ferrari, i thought if i bought a ferrari and advertise locally to pick up grooms and take them to the church on their wedding day it could help cover some of the payments and thankfully i am hanging in there so far with grooms booking their spin.
The thing is because i am not rich everytime i take her out i am on top of the world as i am living my dream the flipside to the coin is i am very nervous and constantly hearing imaginary sounds in the fear that it will break down leaving me in big trouble (this might just have happened). But then i think if i had no worries about the car would it not be such a special car anymore or does a ferrari always set your soul on fire no matter what it costs to your finances?. I would in particular like to hear from you if you owned a ferrari when times were lean but are better now do you get as big a buzz? or maybe enjoy it more.
I have fallen in love with a beautifull italian red head but she may just destroy me!
 

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I was in your position a few years ago, not wealthy but doing OK and owning a fancy sportscar that I was afraid to drive more than a half hour away for fear of something that may go wrong. All that worry disappeared through my owning the car for a few years, driving the car and getting reassurance from guys on this site who have owned Ferrari's way longer than me. Now I treat it like a car. I love driving it but I'm not scared of breaking it anymore. It's a car. I now wash it once a month rather than once a week and I've took it on a couple of 5+ hour trips.

The best way to save money is to learn how to do minor repairs yourself. It is not a difficult car to work on. Some of the repairs involve removing other components to gain access to the one you want but it just involves a little time. Labor is the expensive part of Ferrari repairs and you can get charged a lot for the mechanic removing and re-installing parts that aren't even part of the problem. Working on the car also builds confidence in the car.

If it is breaking you than it may be time to reconsider your position and your goals. Family and home need to come first. Has your wife ever referred to your Ferrari as "That God-Damn Car of yours!!"?
 

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I know what you mean but i wouldn't have the car if it was putting a strain on the family they are number one. As for the wife she is like me nervous of a massive garage bill but is 100% in love with the car and enthuastic about it and has never said anything negative yet (lets hope that lasts)
 

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I bought both of mine when I was "wealthy" and am now going through a "lean" period. have thought about selling but probably won't get to the point where I could buy them back again(particularly the way dino prices are going). The enjoyment factor has been no different across six years of ownership now. It took me six months to calm down after I bought the dino and not be afraid to break it (and that was when I had cash to spare). One of the great joys of ownership has been learning to repair the cars myself. Haven't done an engine out service on the boxer yet but it is due in a couple of years and I think I might have a go. Plenty of great reference material on the web ( and I don't have a mechanical background). If something major breaks, well then I'll just garage it until I have the funds and time to do the repair. There is no rush as they are not daily drivers.

Like yourself, this is a childhood dream come true for me, so just relax and enjoy the ride.
 

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I'm along for the ride as well. I am by no means rich but I have been fortunate enough to have been round cars all my life.
I look upon the car as a big model kit and with the help of the manuals and a good eper have found my 308 easy to work on. I am lucky enough to be able to restore and paint cars so if I do manage to prang it at least I can fix it.
I'm also lucky in that I run about with an ex Rolls Royce engine builder who is now owns a specialist garage and he's very easy on my wallet as I do jobs for him to.
I do find though that as I live in N Ireland cheap parts are non existant. Although N.I is part of the UK, mainland suppliers charge a fortune for postage making parts very dear.
I'd absolutely love to put a Tubi exhaust on the car but the cheapest quote I got was £1600, is that about $3000. Tyres to are very expensive and only one company in England now sells them.
I just love my 308 and have ran it everyday for the last couple of weeks as the weather has been fantastic here but Because of the price of petrol, parts and tyres I tend to nurse the car a bit when I'm out, but I've noticed that after 2 years of ownership I'm starting to relaxe a bit.
Someday I'll be able to afford that exhaust :)
 

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Definately not rich...received a small inheritance a number of years ago. First thing we did was a refi on the house, paid a chunk towards principal and got a 15 yr mortgage (smartest thing ever). Then paid off credit cards, bought jetskis/trailer and the Ferrari. Paid cash for all. Did some IRA stuff and investments too. We figured we could afford to maintain it, and we've been able to, but it can hit hard when it's a major service.
 

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I would not consider myself rich. Well off yes, but rich no. Every Ferrari purchase is financially planned based on the total cost of ownership and then tested against current financial situation. While I do not do any of my own maintenance (cost savings as it would then take a mechanic twice as long to fix what I had really messed up), I do all the washing, waxing, and leather care myself.
 

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I agree with your thoughts Boxer. I am by no means rich. I am financially comfortable, have very little debt and budget my income very well. All my car purchases have been carefully thought out against current living expenses and disposably income. I have been researching and planning my current car purchase for about 2 months now weighing all the options, talking to knowledgable owners, reading tons of materials, and identifying potential risks. Of course, nothing goes quite like you plan, but at least you can be prepared for unforeseen events. The secret is to spend well less than what you make and you can have anything (within reason) you desire.
 

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Law of Relativity

Everything is relative, meaning relative to something else. (sounds a bit like one of those physics class ?). It is what you compare to. It really doesn't matter whether you can pay cash for a 250GTO or struggling to keep one of the least popular Ferrari model. Each to his or her own. If one can find gratification from owning a Ferrari (even if it is a garage queen or a trailer queen), that is what matters. Gratification and enjoyment in ones's own ways. Jimmy
 

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Having the heebie-jeebies through early ownership of a Ferrari is normal I think. I am at the bottom of the food chain income-wise, I work at a factory and scrape and at times starve to own a Ferrari. Testarossas are very good cars if you take care of them. I'm on my 2nd TR and have performed 3 engine-out majors to date. So far so good. I have done a few drives that I would consider as long.....over 300 miles.....with no problems. I do plan things out, carry some extra tools, etc. just in case. But thankfully the ol'e TRs have been good to me. As time goes on you will gain confidence in the car and yourself. The flat-12 motor is very very well built and hardly ever have problems. The trans/differential is the weak like of the drive train and should be treated properly. No burn-outs, no attempted power-shifts, and don't make a habit of full-throttle accelerations in 1st gear. Occasional blasts through the gears is not a problem. But if you run a TR hard, bordering on abuse, it will bite you in the rear (pun intended). Overall the Testarossa is one of the best, most reliable Ferraris on the road. Just spend time with the car occasionally. Look things over, clean electrical connections, check the fluids. Keep those all important cam belts changed every 5 years or 30k miles which ever comes first. Learn to work on the car, buy a cheapie reprint factory service manual and parts manual. Search the internet for info. when needed. Learn what parts cross-reference....like TR fuel injectors are the same part as the late 1970's VW rabbit.....YEP...same bosch part. If you do things smartly you won't regret owning a Testarossa. I'm very very happy with my 2nd one and will some day move on to another one. Can't have a better testimoney than that.
 

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and don't make a habit of full-throttle accelerations in 1st gear.

Why not?, I read that after 5mph you can boot the thing with no worries that the trans might break.:confused:
 

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carguy said:
Having the heebie-jeebies through early ownership of a Ferrari is normal I think. I am at the bottom of the food chain income-wise, I work at a factory and scrape and at times starve to own a Ferrari. Testarossas are very good cars if you take care of them. I'm on my 2nd TR and have performed 3 engine-out majors to date. So far so good. I have done a few drives that I would consider as long.....over 300 miles.....with no problems. I do plan things out, carry some extra tools, etc. just in case. But thankfully the ol'e TRs have been good to me. As time goes on you will gain confidence in the car and yourself. The flat-12 motor is very very well built and hardly ever have problems. The trans/differential is the weak like of the drive train and should be treated properly. No burn-outs, no attempted power-shifts, and don't make a habit of full-throttle accelerations in 1st gear. Occasional blasts through the gears is not a problem. But if you run a TR hard, bordering on abuse, it will bite you in the rear (pun intended). Overall the Testarossa is one of the best, most reliable Ferraris on the road. Just spend time with the car occasionally. Look things over, clean electrical connections, check the fluids. Keep those all important cam belts changed every 5 years or 30k miles which ever comes first. Learn to work on the car, buy a cheapie reprint factory service manual and parts manual. Search the internet for info. when needed. Learn what parts cross-reference....like TR fuel injectors are the same part as the late 1970's VW rabbit.....YEP...same bosch part. If you do things smartly you won't regret owning a Testarossa. I'm very very happy with my 2nd one and will some day move on to another one. Can't have a better testimoney than that.
Very nicely put. I always enjoy hearing about your passion and knowledge of the TR.
 

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Thank You BOXER.....yes I do have the passion....it's the common sense part I'm lacking :)

AMO 911 - there is no real, exact answer to your question that I know of. But in looking at the design of the gearbox, and considering the cost of fixing or replacing it, I feel that caution should be used when doing full blast accelerations in 1st gear. It's probably okay to "get into it" on occasion but until I know for sure that I'm not shortening the life of the gearbox, I will only do a full power blast for a good reason. Like to avoid a collision, or impress a really hot chick! But really....you can put the pedal to the floor from a roll without too much worry in 1st. The mainshaft is usually what will give up first....if no shrapnel floats around in there then your okay. But if grit and debris float through bearings and gears then the cost of "fun" just hit the high "C" like Pavoratti singing Nessun Dorma!!! All I'm saying is use your best judgement....odds are there won't be any problems. But the costs to replace a trans in a Testarossa are 1/3 the value of the entire car. So you just have to keep things in perspective. The Testarossa isn't a drag machine, but once your moving and hitting 4k rpms and higher things really start happening. That is where this car shines. It has such loooong legs. The acceleration is brisk...but deceiving....until you look down at the speedo and see the needle easily and quickly climbing past 120 mph. The Testarossa is a high speed touring car made to go long distances. Hence the rediculous 36 gallon gas capacity. I'm gonna stop now....I get carried away sometimes....I need to take a pill and have a little drinky-poo....see you guys later.
 
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