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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For Sunday, the wheather forcast here in Switzerland called for spectacular conditions, blue sky and hot. I planed therefore to take the "Scudi" for its first real rough drive over 3 different mountain passes to let the car experience his new homeland. I left 5:30 am in the morning by myself, familiy still in bed of course, by starting the engine with a whooooooaaaaaaaaammmmmm grrrrrrrrrrrrrrr (my neighbors will hate me) and went right out of the little village to hit the freeway just 3 minutes after.
Starting that early in the morning makes sure that the first 2 passes can be experienced without any traffic on the pass streets in the mountains, since after 9 - 10 am on a dry Sunday, hundreds of Superbikers will join with their "mortal machines".
After 80 km on the freeway passing forrests and lakes, the car was well warmed up.
In the village Innertkirchen is a small street junction where someone is able to choose which mountain pass to start with. Actually someone may do about 6 - 10 different passes in a day if serious enough but with the plan to be back around noon at home, 3 passes were o.k. for me. I choose to start with the "Susten-Pass". Its a very old pass, with spectacular views and great asphalt conditions. Generally because of the many bikers, Swiss authorities are really taking very well care for the keep and qualities of those Pass streets.

Right in the beginning, the street ascenses strongly into very narrow and twisty curves. I started to run the engine to around 4'500 rpm when exiting the curve until the next curve arrived into it with slow speed to warm up the tires. Doing that I realized that the Scudi is very stable and follows the exact steering line. The engine sound was my Sunday morning "Haydn - Messa" music.
The Susten Pass from beginning one side in the Kanton of Bern to the other side descending to the end of it in Kanton Uri is about 70 km in lengths. (The overall trip distance on that Sunday morning was around 400km). 25 km along the Susten Pass, the street moves slowly out of the forrest at a altitude of around 1800 meters above sea level and the surroundings start to be huge rock-walls and some short tunnels of 20 to 60 meters of lengths. Now the tires have been warmed up enough. I changed the electronic setup from "sport" to "race" to allow maximum fast gear changing but in the same time pushed the knob to soften the suspension (the "Schmacher" invention they say at Ferrari) within the race setup. Even though the street surface was clear and from great qualitiy, you'll find here or there some small bumps, and this softening of the suspension makes the car more responsive to those conditions. So I started to enter the narrow curves with 4-5 rpm's turned around it and after 2/3 of the curve exiting it started push the throttle strongly and reved the car up to 7-8 rpm's before changing gears. The speed at which you get in this car form 4 rpm's to 8 in first gear is very, very fast. I needed to change gear almost right after pushing the throttle. Then in second gear the car came within a second to 7' rpm but I had to brake instantly into the next corner and the whole game started from new. Again and again. Always hearing the "hammer-effect" from the "Hammer-Man" in the gear box, slashing with his hammer the next gear into work and by doing so kicking my back with methodology.
Driving like this, the exhaust "trompeted" the V8 sound to the rocky walls and from there the "Echo" must have waked up the people deep down in the valley. (They are used to it on good weather conditions in the summer and have relief in the wintertime when the passes are closed because of snow conditions) The speed limit is 80km, sometimes 100km and going from the first to the second gear after exiting each narrow curve, I experienced the traction, acceleration and blindingly fast gear change setup always without a feeling of being ever over the limit. (That is mybe a frightening point)
The brakes are compleately adapted and in balance to the power of this car. Driving the 3 passes took a guessed 400 curves, 3 times up and down, and I never, ever had a feeling of unsecurness. Sometimes I tried to stretch the limit a little further by ratching around the steering wheel in a very narrow curve to see if the back is moving. The back never came, rather the front axle was pushing very slightly over the front axle therefore in such extrem conditions the car has a slight tendency to understeer.
This lets me repeat my personal view that the Scuderia is better balanced than the Stradale, is stronger and the brakes are clearly better. (But would anyone expect it differently on a "next generation Ferrari"?)
After reaching the top and descending, I slowed down a little to get a pause from strong concentration. Down in the valley I entered the street to the second Pass called the Furka. The Furka pass represents the home to the famous "Rhone-glacier" and the starting point of the river Rhone (the second biggest river in Europe) which finally flows into the mediterean sea in France. This pass has the lowest street surface quality of all the 3 but is no problem, especially with the "soft" suspension setup. I drove this pass slower and when reaching the top took a 15 minutes break to make 2-3 pictures with the car (they will follow this week). The Furka pass also is the highest of the 3 passes with a altitude of around 2'500 meters a.s..
Going down after again into the valley, descending roughly 1000 meters lower in altitudes there is a little village with 1 hotel and a italian passenger bus with italian tourists just around theis bus (I guess they where on their way to the glacier spot which is quite famous for tourists). Driving thru the village, the speed limit there is 30km so I had to drive slow. The italians have seen the red Ferrari coming and just started to cross the street and by doing that closed it. They barked and made hand sign to stop. I stoped and lowered the window and they took pictures, smiled and talked and gesticulated rather wildly. They way Italians are..extremely friendly, nice just great people. Right after this village the steet takes a strong twist up into the "walls" again and knowing that the italians loved it and are able to hear the noise outside the bus, I started to rev the engine in the first couple of curves again up to 8 rpm and changed gear. It must have been the "trumpets of Jericho" for them.
10 minutes later, the Grimsel pass, the last one on this trip was reached. I took a stop time, drunk a coffee and eat a sandwich while enjoying the wonderful natural sceenery in our gorgeous mountian world. In the meantime, around 9:30am about hundred bikers have been already at the top eating and drinking their Sunday morning brunch. That restaurant on the Grimsel has a great kitchen (for mountain standarts) and is well known because of that. Nevertheless I had to take my pullover as the temparature was around 8 degrees even with best sunny weather.
The trip back afterwards home to my family, which get awake after all, was smooth slow, nice..along the shores of the deep blue/green coloured glacierwater lakes of Brienz and Thun.
Befoer entering my garage, I washed the car, let it cool down and afterwards softly put the "Pijama" over the car. Well done "Scudi".

Summarizing this experience:

1. Whenever you are able to drive over these 3 passes on good weather conditions with your cavallino's, you should do it. Do not miss that in your life.

2. The Scuderia's engine and braking abilities are perfectly balanced, as the suspension variability and steering exactness is. A strong evolution from the CS 360. In between the "Oh my God" effect of the sound and the Hammerman.

3. I'm deeply thankful that life is so good to me and that I'm able to experience such wonderful cars like our "Cavallino's".:)
 

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Great summary, that sounds like it was an awesome time. I felt like I was there.:)

Chris
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
you and Boxer should write a book

I'm serious!

simply amazing, I'm living one of those moments when I'm sorry I was not born in Switzerland
Do not feel sorry to be not in Switzerland. The Winter's are way toooooooo long for Ferrari enthusiasts:eek:
 

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Do not feel sorry to be not in Switzerland. The Winter's are way toooooooo long for Ferrari enthusiasts:eek:
hehehehe that's a good point, but at least you have great roads, great mountains, and there's always skiing during the winter (and that's pretty much the best thing I ever did in my life)
 
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