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Do you know older Ferraris from the 60s/early 70s like the 250s and 275 ect. Does/is a buyer concerned with a fully stamped dealer servicing book. Or is it bought more on condition? Did they have the equivalent service booklet that comes with all modern ferraris? I asume that in the 60s there may have not been many ferrari dealers world wide. So how if ever. were they serviced? How does it work with old stuff?
I only have ever delt with newer stuff that is bought mostly on the back of service stamps in the books. I mean if there are not many stamps they do the walk away thing.
 

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You have to realise that a lot of these cars went through a phase where they were unwanted (particularly during the '70ies). In those days, a lot of service records were losts (and cars as well). My guess is that less than 25% of all classic Ferraris have all documentation present. My own Boxer has all records from 1988, when the market was booming and people realised that it was worth keeping these things.

Servicing in those days was done pretty much the same way it is now. There were some independents and the rest was serviced at the dealership. I don't think there were independent Ferrari specialists back then, although on the other hand I think Fosker's have been in existence for over 30 years. But a significant percentage was worked on by the local Alfa or Fiat dealer.

As for the importance of service books, it depends. For the absolute top of the market, think Pebble Beach concours, service records and original documents are VITALLY important if you want to win.

For normal people, who actually want to drive their car, it is much less important, although it is obviously great if the car sports all documentation going back to the point of sale. Much more important, though, is recent history. When was the last restoration done? By whom? Are they well known for their work on classic Ferraris? How was it done? Did they preserve some patina or did they make the car look better than new? How was the car used, if at all?? It's important that the car gets driven fairly regularly. Museum cars look fantastic but are a nightmare when you start driving them.

What is also important for me personally, if I buy from a private seller, is that these cars are supposed to be cared passionately about. How the seller talks about the car, tells you a lot about how it was used and cared for. If people are knowledgeable about Ferraris, then chances are it is a decent car.


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Do you know older Ferraris from the 60s/early 70s like the 250s and 275 ect. Does/is a buyer concerned with a fully stamped dealer servicing book. Or is it bought more on condition? Did they have the equivalent service booklet that comes with all modern ferraris? I asume that in the 60s there may have not been many ferrari dealers world wide. So how if ever. were they serviced? How does it work with old stuff?
I only have ever delt with newer stuff that is bought mostly on the back of service stamps in the books. I mean if there are not many stamps they do the walk away thing.
Great question. My experience when looking at older Ferraris has been that almost none have a complete history. In fact it is rare that you can even find a car that has the original service book, owners manual, and tool kit. Normally at least 2 or 3 of the items are missing, or if they are present, they are later re-purchases done to increase the "originality" and preceived value of the car.

Personally I think the service history is only relevant for the last several years. When buying it is the current condition that counts. Whether or not the car had its scheduled fluid change 25 years ago is pretty irrelevant to the condition it is in today. In addition, you never know what has been culled out of the history in the past to make it seem like a "no problem" perfect car.
 

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---Personally I think the service history is only relevant for the last several years. ---

I would subscribe to this theory.

You can't be sure what was done and when just because it was claimed. Look to recent services for valuable answers, and ir the car is owned by a true Ferrari afficinado, then there is more reliability.

If it's one of the "it was my son's car and he lost interest in it" I think that would be a cautious purchase decision.

Be prepared to spend $ any way you look at it.
 
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