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I own a 1964 330 GT 2+2 Series I (4 headlight). It's a right-hand drive car that was imported to California in the early '70's and never left. It's absolutely rust-free, in perfect mechanical condition, but being cosmetically restored at present. I have tools, jack, manuals, two sets of Borranis (10 wheels), receipts since new, and even registration tags from when it was in the U.K. (Beauville?).

I made the mistake of engaging in a debate with one of the tools (morons) that was in the paint shop about the relative value of RHD collector cars. This guy was adamant that RHD cars are less valuable. I say more because they are rarer and especially now that the dollar is down and there's lots of interested collectors in U.K., Australia, Japan and wherever else they drive on the wrong side of the road.

Can anyone settle this debate - are RHD collector cars more or less desireable in countries where they drive on the right (wrong) side of the road? Empirical data appreciated.

Thanks in advance.
 

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Can anyone settle this debate - are RHD collector cars more or less desireable in countries where they drive on the right (wrong) side of the road? Empirical data appreciated.

Thanks in advance.
Ahem, excuse me, but actually we do drive on the correct side of the road;) Passing on the left side of a lane dates back to the time of Knights and is far more sensible owing to the fact that 90% of the population are right handed, meaning that you can attack the person coming the opposite way with your sword if you pass on the left. The same is true at jousting festivals - the knights always pass on the left to leave their fighting arm free.

Sorry, I can't help with your question, although I am sure that once all cars were RHD and most countries switched to LHD. Therefore there are a high proportion of antique and vintage RHD, if not classic and collectors.
 

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I also know that Australians want a RHD car. They too would pay more for a RHD car than a LHD car. For countries that drive on the wrong side of the road I believe you are correct in that your car would fetch a premium.

For me, living in the US, I would never be interested in a RHD car so the RHD car would be worth (to me) significantly less than a LHD model. I would tend to agree with the tool (moron) in your paint shop. I would not pay top dollar for a sweet ride if I'm going to be looking at the ditch instead of the passing lane.
 

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I also know that Australians want a RHD car. They too would pay more for a RHD car than a LHD car. For countries that drive on the wrong side of the road I believe you are correct in that your car would fetch a premium.

For me, living in the US, I would never be interested in a RHD car so the RHD car would be worth (to me) significantly less than a LHD model. I would tend to agree with the tool (moron) in your paint shop. I would not pay top dollar for a sweet ride if I'm going to be looking at the ditch instead of the passing lane.
Actually I think it is more than a want in Australia, to the best of my knowledge if the car is under 25 years old, it has to be RHD to be road registered in Australia.
 

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Actually I think it is more than a want in Australia, to the best of my knowledge if the car is under 25 years old, it has to be RHD to be road registered in Australia.
That doesn't apply to a car that is as old as me and you. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Agreed - RHD is not as valuable in the US, except in parts. Although I get a lot of curious stalkers when driving, it's mostly viewed as an oddity among the Tifosi.

Having no basis for comparison and no way to know the market in Europe, Japan or Australia, I thought members of this forum might have better insight and first-hand knowledge. Keep it coming.
 

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On Vintage Ferraris in Europe, RHD does not command a premium. It maybe preferred by many buyers in the UK but the continent is the larger market and it is LHD. The only time I have seen a difference in value between LHD and RHD is on new(ish) Ferraris in the UK where LHD used to be priced at a discount to RHD.
 

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Ahem, excuse me, but actually we do drive on the correct side of the road;) Passing on the left side of a lane dates back to the time of Knights and is far more sensible owing to the fact that 90% of the population are right handed, meaning that you can attack the person coming the opposite way with your sword if you pass on the left. The same is true at jousting festivals - the knights always pass on the left to leave their fighting arm free.
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Yes but there is a need to move on an adapt driving/riding to more modern techniques of warfare. When one is firing a rifle on horseback you shoot over your left shoulder. Hence passing on the right.
 

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Seems to me that you could apply a sliding scale - the more valuable the car, the less difference it makes whether it's left or right in whichever country:thumbup:
I.e an LHD 308 here in the UK would be worth markedly less than RHD (at a guess maybe 25 to 30% - Boxer?), however an LHD 250 T/R would be worth an identical amount to a RHD one here.
Cheers, Al.
 

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Seems to me that you could apply a sliding scale - the more valuable the car, the less difference it makes whether it's left or right in whichever country:thumbup:
I.e an LHD 308 here in the UK would be worth markedly less than RHD (at a guess maybe 25 to 30% - Boxer?), however an LHD 250 T/R would be worth an identical amount to a RHD one here.
Cheers, Al.
Al, I am not sure on the 308 anymore. The strength of the Euro is driving prices of lower value LHD Ferraris back up as it is easy to buy a car in the UK and move it to Germany etc. On the higher value Ferraris, I see absolutely no difference in value between a LHD or a RHD car.
 

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I agree with Boxer on the last comment, a good friend of mine has recently sold his LHD race prepared C.1991 Porsche 964 RS to a Spanish buyer for the same as he would have got in the UK for a RHD version. He did a similar thing with a LHD 996 GT3 last year and got a fair offer for that too.

Personally I don't think LHD vs RHD puts people off as there will always be a market for cars with good provenence. The cars that look like they are sticking around are the ones with poor history and insurance Cat D's. There are a couple of 328's and a 550 that have been doing the rounds on Ebay and at various dealers for the last couple of years.
 

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As I intend to but a 348 or 355 in the next couple of years. I have been keeping my eye on the prices. The LHD here in the UK do seem to be cheaper than their RHD versions.
 

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Hi, Phil from Melbourne here. Whilst the car is in excellent condition it is overpriced. You need to consider two things: 1. Do I want a car in this condition and am prepared to maintain it, or, 2. Just get a solid driver. This car is pitched at the former type of buyer who is after a concourse winner. It is overpriced though and has been for sale for about a year now.
 

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Ahhh....forgot to mention that I agree with the chap from AlsaAutomotive....the older the car the less it matters. RHD cars command a premium here here but if it is 30 years of age or older it can be road registered. Any cheap RHD Ferraris in the states I wouild be interetsted in.
Cheers
Phil
71 365 GT 2 +2
72 Lambo Espada
67 Alfa 2600 Sprint
67 Maserati Ghibli
 
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