Ferrari Life Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
This is a question for those of you who are familiar with the Ferrari market in the US. Last year I bought a 2002 360 Spider F1. It had about 3,000 miles and I paid a premium by buying it through a Ferrari authorized dealership. I was told by the dealership (and I should know better) that by buying from them, I would fall in their customer loop and would be allowed to switch to a newer vehicle every 1 or 2 years at almost a break even price. I guess my logic was, this is kind of like an initiation fee. I definitively do not want to find myself with a Ferrari that is out of warranty (for resale purposes).

Do of any of you own newer Ferraris and change them every couple of years? And if so, do you find they retain their value well?

Don't take me wrong. I did not buy the car as an investment. I bought it to enjoy it, but decided to pay a premium from the authorized dealer with future upgrades in mind. I want to know if this upgrading at minimal $ scenario exists in other cities or if they fed me a line of BS.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
6,320 Posts
The price will all depend on the market demand. The 360 is holding its value well so a trade up to the 420 or 360 CS now will give you a fairly good value. The best thing about going to the dealer is you are "queued" so to speak for future Ferraris. Because you bought from them you'll be higher on the list for the 420 than a first time buyer of a Ferrari that wants the 420. That is one of the biggest advantages.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,684 Posts
You'll lose, no matter what the model is. Some more than others though. But you'll lose. But Ferraris have been able to hold their value better than any other make.

The only models that will retain it's value are the limited series like the Enzos, then again maybe for a few years after that they too lose their value.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
749 Posts
Remember that even Ferrari salesmen are still car dealers, so approach with caution! Unless the "new" price is significantly inflating then no-one will give you what you paid for your "older" one - they will get their own new(er) one instead.

Which brings me to this ...
At AUD$70000 = US$52000 there's something badly wrong with this 2004 360 Spider trade-in (and at a dealer's too) :eek: :nuts:
http://www.drive.com.au/used/search/detail.aspx?id=1586138&pg=1&pp=3&d=0
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
895 Posts
4kids3fish said:
Remember that even Ferrari salesmen are still car dealers, so approach with caution! Unless the "new" price is significantly inflating then no-one will give you what you paid for your "older" one - they will get their own new(er) one instead.

Which brings me to this ...
At AUD$70000 = US$52000 there's something badly wrong with this 2004 360 Spider trade-in (and at a dealer's too) :eek: :nuts:
http://www.drive.com.au/used/search/detail.aspx?id=1586138&pg=1&pp=3&d=0
Very true.

Woah, that's awful cheap...someone must've forgotten a digit before the 7...that can't be right.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,509 Posts
Stradale said:
The only models that will retain it's value are the limited series like the Enzos, then again maybe for a few years after that they too lose their value.
The price on the older Ferraris has remained pretty stable. I've had my car for 2 years and it is still worth what I paid for it. I've been tracking the value and it has gone up to $26 and down to $22.5 (what it is now). I think the big boost on my car is the fact that it is the last of the carb Ferraris. I don't believe the price will go any lower than what it is.

For a new car, you will always lose. Always.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top