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Discussion Starter #1
Magoo,

I've read your posts (elsewhere) on the subject. Later this year, I'd like to redye the leather interior of my 308 GTB. I know the original color is Connolly VM 3218 (specified in the build sheet) and I'm planning on using Connolly's water-based dye as you've suggested. My seats have always been covered and are not too bad, but the headrests and door panels need attention. I plan to redye all the tan leather surfaces. Hirsch Auto is not far from me and they've been very helpful to me in the past. I know they will be of great assistance to me once again.

I know you achieved fine results when you did this last year. I was hoping you could tell me how you prepared the leather for redying and any particulars, like what to do with the stitching, which might be helpful. I've read much of what you had to say on this topic but your comments were found over numerous threads. Perhaps you might put it all together in this forum as a reference for this project.

Thanking you again,
Barry
 

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Seat Dye

Hey Barry, Yes I did my entire interior in my 79 GTS. I used the Connolly water based Dye and had great results. You are correct on the dye number of the 3218 Hirsch refers to it as biscuit. Be sure to get the water based clear that goes with it. I completely removed the entire tan interior from the car and dismantled the seats removing the back from the seat. I then washed the seats and the door panels down with acetone to remove all the old color. I used duct tape during this process on the black strips that run in the seat cushion and seat back. This prevented the acetone from removing the black and also kept the stiching clean. But you still have to be careful around the taped off area. Masking tape does not work because the acetone vapors melt the adhesive and it won't stick. I also carefuly cut the tape around the critical areas with a exacto knife. BE CAREFUL and watch what you are cutting. After I had the old color removed from the seat and they were dry and no acetone remained I then removed the duct tape and cleaned the areas very throughly with cotton swabs around the black strips and down in the seams of the cushion of any old residue of acetone and old dye. I then used masking tape to mask off the black stripes and I began applying the dye in very light layers. I used a Revell paint sprayer which is a aerosol can on top of a jar that sprays the dye. They can be found in Home Depot or hobby stores. When you use the dye, I would strain the paint as it goes into the bottle. I used a piece of nylon stocking over the bottle neck and poured the dye into the bottle. This is important for no clogging of the paint sprayer. I then began spraying the dye in light coats. Many coats will have to be applied and dry in between. Then coat with the clear and let set up a couple of days and install.
 

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Acetone

Peter, There is nothing else other than lacquer thinner, acetone, that will cut the old finish. Hirsch says to use it. It evaporates very quickly and you remove it with the old finish anyway. It is not like using a solvent based spray dye where the finish hardens and later cracks. You are removing the old finish and lacquer,acetone, as you clean the leather of the old dye.
 

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P.S. I did mine over a year and a half ago and it is as pliable as the day I did it. No cracking or hardening of the dye.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks, Magoo. I'll be doing this later on this year. The folks at Hirsch Auto are always very helpful as well and always send detailed instruction sheets for each restoration project. I just needed your advice on some of the finer points of this process.

Barry
 

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My seat are cracking, Do you yawl have any idea how to make it stop. I've been putting glove oil, hyed food and a few other things.
Any ideas.

So, far none of it has torn.

Thanks
kelly
 

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Would you have a similar situation like mine Kelly (where this "dye" is really a "paint" and its making the leather dry and hard)?

I haven't used any type of leather treatment as I know it wouldn't penetrate this surface I have (I know if I get it off - with acetone as Magoo suggested - it may reveal the leather and thus accept leather treatment, making the leather once again soft).
 

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Peter, You are exactly correct. Once the hard coating, dye, is removed the leather will become soft as new. Let me know if I can be of any further help to you guys. You will be very pleased with the Connolly waterbased acrylic dye. Just be sure you use the clear along with it. Also if you have any small cracks that need filling they have a great flex filler that can be used. Magoo
 

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I got the figure nail polish remover, Or better that what my wife calls Acetone. I tried on the two bad spots.n Looks like it did a great job, but when do you know it quit. How do you know when you have it all off?

Let me know.

Thanks
Kelly
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Kelly,

The nail polish remover is buffered acetone, as your wife says. I'm reserving this project until the fall. I'll be getting the materials from Hirsch Auto, near me. I'll ask about the lacquer thinner they recommend for preparation. No doubt it's a buffered type just like nail polish remover.

The Connolly leather used by Ferrari at that time was premium grade. It makes sense to retain the quality leather we already have and do what we can to make it look, feel and smell new. The process Magoo recommends should be a better and longer lasting treatment than the original process used by Connolly back then.

Barry
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Magoo,

That's a good question Kelly asked. How do you know when you've finished with the lacquer thinner preparation step?

Barry
 

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Barry, The lacquer thinner preperation should be taken down to the orig. leather and eliminate all the orig color.
 

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Also Barry, You should be sure that all the residue is removed and the surface is completely dry before applying the first coat of the water based acrylic dye.
 

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Back On

Andrew, If it had not been for you I wouldn't have had any idea AOL was the problem. Thank you for your research and suggesting that I contact AOL. If any of you guys have AOL and you have a problem signing on or the background colors not being correct, not being able to get in to your profile or simply not being able to reply to the posts, Andrew now has the info. I got from AOL to straighten it out. The problem was definetly what they called a graphics problem. They didn't want to admit it at first but after much discussion they straightened it out. Very frustrating to me but it was not the fault of this site.
 

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Drive your Ferrari for what it is, Not for what it isn't.

I added that because so many times people expect the Ferrari to be a "Dragster," a off the line tire burner, and a car that is expected to be like the old Camaro SS and Ford Mustang Mach 1's. The Ferrari was not intended to be a car like those old in line dragsters, which we all love, so drive your Ferrari for what it is intended. A high end well handling performance car that is a thrill and a priviledge to drive. A car that has timeless design and a heritage unlike any other car in the world. If you guys are like me you are proud to be a Ferrari owner and know you are driving the greatest name in sports cars of the world, "FERRARI"
 
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