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Hi

You've all probably been asked this by too many people already but...

i'm thinking of getting a 360 this summer but I'm unsure as to the costs of servicing.

I've looked up servicing costs but they look fairly reasonable considering i've only heard scary costs like over £2,000 a service...

So far a local specialist is saying £375 for a cambelt service and £590 for a 6000 mile service??? is that all there is too them? just a cambelt change and a service every 6,000miles?

Sounds way too good to be true.

Any info or views on past experiences with these cars would be great.

Thanks... Tom

Ps: how much for other often needed parts... discs, pads, etc...
 

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Tom, service costs vary by model and in fact by geographical region so it would be best if someone from London responds since you are noting dollar figures in pounds. Your suggested figures seem like they are in the ball park for what I have seen posted by owners of 360's. Pricing for other items you noted such as brake discs and pads are no more then any other sports car so I would concentrate on getting people to let you know the price to maintain the car say in F1 configuration versus a 6 Speed Manuel. I know the F1 costs more to maintain but I don't have any specific figures. I hope others will give you more information. Nice choice of Ferrari model by the way.
 

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Suggest you call the following:

Mike at Rardley 01428-606616
Roger at Ferrari Centre 0700-355430
Russell at Bob Houghton 01451-860794
Ferrari in Egham 01784-436431

and get quotes for the services. Mike and Roger should also be able to provide estimates on the annnual running costs.
 

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Caution about running costs and you'll love it. Do Research 1st!

I would say it will vary considerably, not only taking into account the area your in but the condition of the car and model year, its a bit of a lottery really and it really isn't the labour rate thats the main problem, its the part prices!

Q. Have all the service updates/bulletins been done such as software updates on the f1 gearbox (which considerably reduced clutch wear)?
Q. What about the engine vernier pullies replaced (which stopped engine failure!!).
etc. etc. Many of these things where done quietly without fuss by Ferrari main dealer service buletins but probably have not been done by all the specialists out there. (I'm sure some do but certainly not all of them even know of the problems) which can mean a less reliable car.

Also since there where considerable and constant model updates over the production life I would argue 360's from 2002 onwards are the most reliable. Even things like the first cars having engine bay covers that didnt have rain channel guides in them, result, steamed up rear windows for the first 30 minutes in cold weather (not great for visibility) especially if you didnt have the challenge grille. Etc.

I have seen some cars where the services have cost a modest approx £1,000 (minor service) and them some real bleepers where the cars driven into dealers with what appeared to be a minor clutch problem and handling feeling a 'little bit fluffy'...

Results; they've replaced the clutch plate, the thrust bearings, etc. then realized the brake discs/pads needed doing and discovered the rear tyres where worn and the front ball joints/bushes worn resulting in knocking during cornering requiring full alignment after fitting new parts.

Total price for the service, in excess of 7K!

You really must be realistic about these cars, just because they are half the new price now the servicing costs havent dropped that much. You must reserve at least a few thousand as a contingency over the purchase price to put right all the little niggles that are highly likely to rear their head.

Parts are still pricey, even silly things like a broken seat winder nob (just a piece of silly plastic!), yours for £60. An original front bumper £2,000, A windscreen, a cool £2,000. Rear window glass, £2,000. Front headlight, in excess of £1,000. Replacement Engine 2nd hand supplier (no box) will set you back approx £10,000... Engines used 10 litres of very expensive oil, just oil alone is over £100 and typicallly gets replaced every few thousand miles.

Wonderful cars and I really do not mean to put you off in any way at all just be realistic about how much you can run one on. I.e. not a shoe string. Realistically if you cannot afford to run 2 cars you probably cannot afford to own one - insurance for restricted mileage policies can be VERY cheap if your over 25 with full NCB and use it as a wekend car...

Good luck!

Trev
 

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You really must be realistic about these cars, just because they are half the new price now the servicing costs havent dropped that much. You must reserve at least a few thousand as a contingency over the purchase price to put right all the little niggles that are highly likely to rear their head.

Wonderful cars and I really do not mean to put you off in any way at all just be realistic about how much you can run one on. I.e. not a shoe string. Realistically if you cannot afford to run 2 cars you probably cannot afford to own one - insurance for restricted mileage policies can be VERY cheap if your over 25 with full NCB and use it as a wekend car...

Good luck!

Trev
Excellent advice! This was also always the problem wiht the 456 GT. They maybe GBP 30k cars now but they still carry the servcing costs of the GBP 150k car that they were new.

New Ferraris do depreciate but servicing cost do not follow the same financial curve.
 

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Excellent advice! This was also always the problem wiht the 456 GT. They maybe GBP 30k cars now but they still carry the servcing costs of the GBP 150k car that they were new.

New Ferraris do depreciate but servicing cost do not follow the same financial curve.
Some excellent advice here already. I've done a lot of research in the past 8 months and built a very advanced spreadsheet before I purchased my 550 to make sure I could afford not just to buy the car but run it as well. I'm just a mining engineer with a couple of stock options so even though the purchase was manageable it was vital for me to find out whether I could afford the running costs on my regular salary.

Fortunately, with the advent of the internet and these types of forums you can find an amazing amount of information if you take your time. The 550 that EVO Magazine ran as a long-termer and their buying guide was probably the best help.

I suggest you start building a spreadsheet similar to mine and literally put EVERYTHING in it. Petrol, brake pads, discs, labour, depreciation, insurance, road tax etc. Once you're at it for a month or two you get a very, very good idea of what these cars will cost you in total. In fact, you'll have a better idea than a lot of owners who quite often use the ostrich approach (or just have enough money not to care - nothing wrong with that!).

Obviously, there's also an element of luck and bad luck involved and for that I budgeted a contingency of GBP7,500 (EUR10,000) every 25,000kms.

In the end, including depreciation, fuel, tyres, storage, everything, for a 550 in London you should end up around the GBP2.50/mile based on 4000 miles a year. A 360 should be very similar. Hope this helps, and good luck!


Onno



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I owned a 360 Modena F1 for 2 years and I can confirm that they are VERY expensive to keep! The dealer I went to went through the car with a fine tooth comb each time it went in, and seemed to come up with loads of stuff that needed doing. The last list I had was like this:

Reset geometry, new engine mountings, cam seals weeping, 4 new tyres,new lower front ball joints, new rear antiroll bar, new LH rear track rod ends, new brake discs all round, new clutch................a snip at £5666.40, then I had the service cost on top of that.

Having said that I still think that the 360 Modena F1 is one of the most fantastic cars ever and I would get another one - but probably a spyder.
 

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If you are dedicated to owning an exotic car, but still have to worry about maintenence costs, you owe it to yourself to learn how to work on your car. It is highly rewarding, and allows you to do much more preventative maintenence, even further reducing costs.

Economics aside, Its the only way you will ever become truly intimate with your machine.
 

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I often see ads for Ferrari which state something like "last inspektion in xx/xxxx for 11,000€". €2,000 inspektion...ok...€3,000....ok....but more than 10,000€?

I wonder if many of the repairs and replacements suggested by dealers are really neccessary, or if they are in fact a rip-off.

Our BMW dealer here in Hannover mentioned to me that I couldn't possibly drive around in my V12 for long without investing at least €3,000 in repairs, which included a partial replacement of the front suspension and the hydraulic system.

Since then, I have driven more than 40,000km in two years with that particular car, the suspension still works fine, so does the hydraulic system. It just passed TÜV inspektion with zero issues. I have found a good independent garage and learned to diagnose problems myself and spent less than €2,000 in maintenance and repairs. At BMW, I would have paid more in repairs by now than I have paid for the complete car, I guess.

So all in all, the more you know about your car the less you spend on repairs, don't you?

Always my best,

John
 

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Since then, I have driven more than 40,000km in two years with that particular car, the suspension still works fine, so does the hydraulic system. It just passed TÜV inspektion with zero issues. .........

So all in all, the more you know about your car the less you spend on repairs, don't you?
I might suggest that the more klms/miles you put on your F-car, the better it will run, the less it will rot, and therefore....... the less you spend on repairs.

F-cars are machines, that need a minimum amount of usage to keep at their peak. This contrasts with their value, which tends to drop with useage....there's the rub!
Rubber hoses and parts dry out with disuse, other components seize without regular use......this is why most garage queens are to be avoided. It's the driven cars that display the least amount of mechanical concerns, ask any f-car mechanic.....
 
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