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Discussion Starter #1
Hello everybody. Looks like a great forum. Unlike many of the fortunate forum members, I don't live in a year round Ferrari friendly climate, so in a couple of months it'll be time to put the 308 into winter storage. Any great suggestions? In years past I've changed the oil, added fuel stabilizer, a coat of wax and a battery tender. I've got an insulated garage that doesn't get quite to freezing. Is it best to start the car periodically or should it just lay quietly until spring?

I'm open to any suggestions to keep it in good shape and hopefully prevent starting difficulties in the spring.


Andy
 

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umsneeze said:
Hello everybody. Looks like a great forum. Unlike many of the fortunate forum members, I don't live in a year round Ferrari friendly climate, so in a couple of months it'll be time to put the 308 into winter storage. Any great suggestions? In years past I've changed the oil, added fuel stabilizer, a coat of wax and a battery tender. I've got an insulated garage that doesn't get quite to freezing. Is it best to start the car periodically or should it just lay quietly until spring?

I'm open to any suggestions to keep it in good shape and hopefully prevent starting difficulties in the spring.


Andy
Ann Arbor, very cold indeed. Are you a Wolverine fan? BTW welcome to the forum.

You should start the car at least twice a month. If the car is never going to move also look into getting some divits for your tires so they don't develop flat spots. One problem with sevre cold is other parts that don't warm up from just a start (brakes, fluid lines, etc). As I'm sure you know the best solution is to have an environment controled garage. Air is one of the best insulators, you could look into a "Car Coon" like Justyn, here on this forum see garage, has. This may help keep it a little warmer inside and around the car.
 

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Hi Andy,

a carcoon could be a good idea for you. Mine cost me about £450 GBP (picture attached) and it's basically a sort of plastic "tent" that the car lives in. Air is circulated around the vehicle preventing condensation from gathering.

You can find out more at http://www.carcoon.com (I have absolutely no affiliation with this company BTW)

I try to use my 348 at least once per week including during the winter as I believe that the best way to keep the car in top shape is to make sure everything gets up to running temperature often.

I don't know what the climate is like where you live though, maybe you have heavy snow etc that would prevent you from doing this.

As far as long term storage, I would offer the following advice:

1) Fill the fuel tank to prevent any condensation from forming in there.

2) As Andy said, beware of causing flat spots on the tyres. You could over-inflate them while it is stored to help prevent this. The best way to stop flat spots is to ensure that the car isn't standing on the same area of tyre constantly though.

3) Don't leave the handbrake (parking brake) on as this can seize up.

4) Obviously make sure you have enough anti-freeze in the coolant if the temperature in the garage will get very low.

All the best, oh, and do you have any photos of your pride and joy to share with us?

Kind regards,

Justyn.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the suggestions. The tent might be a good way for me to go. Unfortunately we get plenty of snow in the winter, and with the salt on the roads I'd rather not risk the corrosion I could get. My girlfriend actually noticed that I have a heating vent in the wall to the garage...right now it points into the house, with a little work it would be easy to vent some of the heat into the garage, and keep it above freezing. (I have to give her credit...she's looking over my shoulder)

Now about the Ohio State thing....I thought somebody screened these forums for obscene pictures? I'll refrain from making any Maurice Clarett statements...

Andy
 

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I agree with Andrew and Justyn's suggestions with one exception. Once I put the car up, I do not start it again until spring. The reason for this is that when you start it your engine block will start to warm up and then when you shut the car off it cools back down and condensation will form inside the engine. The condensation will cause rust on the cylinder walls and will mix with the sulphur (combustion by-product) to form sulphuric acid that sits in the bearings. The only way to boil off the water is to run the car UNDER LOAD for 20 minutes AFTER the engine is at full operating temperature.

Here's what I do (and I live in Maine and store the car in an unheated garage):
1-Change the oils (engine and gearbox)
2-Check/Change coolant as required
3-Fill fuel tank and add fuel stabilizer (such as Stabil)
4-Run the car to make sure the treated fuel is in the carburetors
5-While the engine is running, spray fogging oil (available at most parts stores in your area) into the carburetors or air intake until a good white cloud of smoke pours from the exhaust (this makes sure all internal components are lightly coated with a film of the oil).
6-Remove the spark plugs and spray some fogging oil in each cylinder
7-Turn the engine over to blow out the excess oil and reinstall the plugs.
8-Spray a light coat of fogging oil on the engine surfaces.
9-Remove the battery and store it in the basement.

In the spring, put the battery back in and start it up. You’re all set, no special "spring start-up" procedures or anything like that. Just give it a bath. All the engine driven stuff I own gets this treatment before it gets stored, from the lawnmower to the Ferrari.

The flat spot on the tire deal was true with the old bias-ply tires but isn't a problem with the new radials. The radial tires don't develop "a memory" like the old bias-plys.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Pete-
Thanks for the advice. I hadn't heard of the fogging oil until I saw similar advice about storing a motorcycle for the winter.

I've heard conflicting advice regarding starting the car, letting it warm up etc. during the winter. What about the timing belts? Any chance that if the engine sits the belts will conform to the shape of the pully and skip a cog when you start up?

Andy
 

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I've never heard of any reports of timing belt deformation due to storage.
 

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Hey Andy,
I was noticing that it seems you and I have a similar taste in automobiles.

You've got:
1982 308GTSi
1987 MB 560SL
1993 Jeep Wrangler
2003 Saab 93
2003 Suzuki sv650

I've got:
79 308 GTS
99 MB E300TD
82 Jeep CJ7
96 Ram 2500
69 Jeep Commando

So we both have some for the snow and some for the go! :eek:ha:
 

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See the picture attached:

If your car looks like this come spring, you've done something wrong!!!

:ugh:
 

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I've seen that photo before but I forget where. As I recall, it was a water pipe that broke while the owners were away.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Hopefully I won't wake up to a Ferrari popsicle! I spent some time this weekend making my garage more hospitable. Insulated the walls, dry wall and heating duct is next. This is my first winter in this house, and the garge isn't as warm as I'd like, so hopefully some easy work will help a lot.

And Pete- I agree, we have similar car taste. I spent some quality time with my Jeep this weekend, replaced the serpentine belt, radiator hoses, oil, etc. Looks like I need to get a big pickup and you need a motorcycle, then we'd be even!

Did you ever heard Enzo Ferrari's quote about the Jeep?
I'm paraphrasing, but he said something like "The Jeep is the only true American sports car." I'm sure that will irritate anyone with a Vette/Mustang or Viper, but is interesting nonetheless.

Andy
 
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