Ferrari Life Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
79 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone know affirmatively what material the Ferrari F430 (2006) stock rim is made of? The dealer believes it is a "magnesium alloy blend" but I would like to know for sure. This is an odd question, I know. I have a slightly dented rim and would rather fix it if that avoids the $2,100 for a new ball polished rim. If it is magnesium, I'm told, it can't be repaired because it is flamable.

If the dealer isn't sure, I don't know who else to ask. If you are replying and "taking a stab at it," please state so. We don't need more hunches flying around. We've got plenty of those already. ;)

Looks like I will probably need a new rim, but would like to see if anyone knows otherwise first. Thanks in advance should some one know about this tricky one...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
532 Posts
im pretty sure the rims on the stock f430 are aluminium, because i am looking at a bunch of sites and they all say that the 430 scuderias are magnesium, and ive found a couple of sites saying the stock f430's are aluminium.

most respect.
nick
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
265 Posts
Does anyone know affirmatively what material the Ferrari F430 (2006) stock rim is made of? The dealer believes it is a "magnesium alloy blend" but I would like to know for sure. This is an odd question, I know. I have a slightly dented rim and would rather fix it if that avoids the $2,100 for a new ball polished rim. If it is magnesium, I'm told, it can't be repaired because it is flamable.

If the dealer isn't sure, I don't know who else to ask. If you are replying and "taking a stab at it," please state so. We don't need more hunches flying around. We've got plenty of those already. ;)

Looks like I will probably need a new rim, but would like to see if anyone knows otherwise first. Thanks in advance should some one know about this tricky one...
Dear Comrade GearHead,

It is not a simple question of whether the wheels are aluminum or magnesium, but to establish the metallurgical structure of the material. Should you weld it with a filler wire of an incorrect metallurgy this is likely to become very obvious visually. This notwithstanding, in the very application of heat during the welding process this too may affect the structure of the material and could lead to cracking. So you should be very circumspect in applying any heat whatsoever untll you have sought advice and established the material that your wheels are made from (there are numerous grades of both alloy and magnesium).

The correct procedure here, would be to establish the metallurgy of the wheels and this question should be put to your Ferrari dealer who should be able to supply full details of the material via the auspices of their direct contacts within Ferrari SpA. Once the grade of material has been confirmed you should then consult a welding specialist who will be aware of the correct procedures to follow in remedying your problem to your ultimate satisfaction.

I trust this will be helpful.

With kind regards,

Vulcan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
The rim is a propriety alloy mixed by BBS and formed in Germany as a cast product. It is "flow-formed" and heat treated, ending in a paint like process that covers the entire wheel in a thick powdercoat like durable finish.

The only current production street wheel that is magnessium is the Porsche Carrera GT (Porsche requested Magnessium to give it supercar status and set it apart from the GT3 and GT2).

You should always be very careful with attempting to repair wheels for several reasons. Comments below are specific to BBS wheels, but can apply to other brands as well

-Alloy makeup is a proprietery mixture and varies from wheel to wheel. The repair shop will not be able to match it, therefore the weight properties and strength will always be off, even if repaired to perfect dimensions.

-Since alloy make-up can't be matched, a weld will never be fully attached, creating a weakspot

-The flow-forming process BBS uses compresses the cast material under heat and pressure (similar to a forging process) to stretch the outer rim and reduce outer rotating mass. Yes, it's possible to heat with a torch, bend back to original shape and make it look like new. However, the structural make-up of the wheel is now compromised as you've heat treated it and weakened it.

-Even when fixing the paint on a wheel, you need to be careful. Chemical paint strippers can attack the alloy and weaken the wheel. Using a heat gun to strip, or heat to cure the paint will weaken the wheel. Powder coating is one of the worst things you can do to a heat treated wheel.

-Each time you heat cycle the wheel, you are getting up to a 30% reduction in structural strength...EACH TIME!

-Driving day to day may be ok on a repaired wheel, but in a car that's designed to give you 100% performance and go to the very limits of safety, do you want a wheel that's only 90% or 80% of original strength (or even less) when you're going 150+mph? Wheels don't normally fail just sitting in a parking lot or even driving at normal speeds...but at 170mph a failure of your wheels is going to have catastropic results.

-BBS's official policy is their wheels can not be repaired, any attempt to will void all warranties. When a wheel has reached the point where it needs repair, it should be discarded and replaced. This isn't to just sell more wheels, there are valid safety concerns here. Dealers who offer to repair, or independant shops that do the repairs are returning a product that is not 100% of the product that you originally had.

I'm not suggesting you attempt to repair your wheel, however if the shop you are talking to asked you if it was magnessium or aluminum (a good shop could tell just by looking at the wheel's stampings), run aways and find someone competent!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
The correct procedure here, would be to establish the metallurgy of the wheels and this question should be put to your Ferrari dealer who should be able to supply full details of the material via the auspices of their direct contacts within Ferrari SpA. Once the grade of material has been confirmed you should then consult a welding specialist who will be aware of the correct procedures to follow in remedying your problem to your ultimate satisfaction.

As noted above, the wheels are made by BBS and the metallurgy is never released to the public, in fact I would be suprised if it was even released to Ferrari. Internally, BBS employees can not even find out unless they're one of the engineers working on the design or assembly line...it's a closely guarded secret. Official policy is the wheels can never be repaired.

In the aftermarket world, BBS offers a road hazard warranty in addition to the normal product warranty for their products to take the pain out of damaged wheels. If the damage was not the result of manuf. defect, original owner can exchange the wheel for a replacement at 40% off MSRP.

In case you can't tell, I'm a former BBS employee and something of a wheel industry expert. Feel free to PM me any specific questions, or post ones you think the list would benefit from. If I don't have the technical answer, I have many industry experts and engineers I can consult for you.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top