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Discussion Starter #1
Okay, this is definitely a weird question.

I'm heading out this week to pick up my newly-acquired Testarossa from the port in Vancouver. It's in a secure bonded facility, and neither I nor my customs agent have access to the car until I get there.

I had arranged to rent an enclosed car trailer to bring the vehicle home, and when those arrangements fell through, I scrambled to find another trailer. The only one I car arrange at short notice has a width, between the wheel wells, of 79". A quick google search indicates that the Testarossa width is 77.8". Any of you know if this is accurate? Would this be the extreme outside measurement? I don't want to drag this trailer 900 miles only to find that the Testarossa won't quite fit...

the wheel wells inside the trailer are 16" high, so driving over them isn't an option.
 

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Yep, that's the measurement I found online as well. I'm just wondering, practically, if that's accurate, and what it measures? If it includes the mirrors, no problem, I can fit this one inside the trailer. If it's from outside tire to outside tire, that might work (though it would be pretty tight). But does the bodywork extend further, etc? Any ideas?
 

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Hello Canuckcarguy: I went out and measured the distance across the rear tires of my Testarossa.....78 inches. I have 360 Modena wheels on my car...but this is still about right. I remember bringing my TR home from Atlanta in an enclosed trailer and I only had about 3/4 of an inch between the TR's rear tires to the trailer's wheel wells. I put a couple pieces of wood in between the trailer wheel wells and the rear tires sidewalls to keep things put on the long trip home. If you can winch the car into the trailer that's great. I had to drive mine up in and then do quite a twistie to climb out the window, and stepping onto the trailer's wheel well. When your TR is in the trailer...have the trans in neutral, NOT in gear. You should apply the emergency brake, and tie the car down through the wheels if possible. I'm sure you already know this stuff. Just play it safe and cautious. Do periodic stops to check things out, etc.

Good Luck and let us know how things go. Congratulations from a fellow TR owner...welcome!
 

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Yep, that's the measurement I found online as well. I'm just wondering, practically, if that's accurate, and what it measures? If it includes the mirrors, no problem, I can fit this one inside the trailer. If it's from outside tire to outside tire, that might work (though it would be pretty tight). But does the bodywork extend further, etc? Any ideas?
The measurement should be from the widest point to widest point but will not include the mirrors if they fold in.
 

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Testarossas are wider in the rear than the front. For less qualified drivers this can result in scraped rear wheels, dents, etc. Interestingly the width from mirror tip to mirror tip is the same as the width of the rear body. So when pulling into something like a bank drive-thru, or pulling up to a curb, use the mirrors as a guide to maintaining clearance for the rear end and rear wheels/tires. I don't know if this was a design intent or it just worked out that way....but it's nice to know. As for folding mirrors, I don't think the TR's mirrors fold....if they do that's great, but I've never pushed hard enough on them to find out.
 

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Thanks for all of the advice, I'll be heading out today, and will post a progress report once I've picked up the car...
 

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The measurement should be from the widest point to widest point but will not include the mirrors if they fold in.[/QUOTE]

Be carefull with those mirrors. According to a Ferrari sales men they are very expensive (he claimed $ 1300 per mirror). Don't know if it's true.
 

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Yes Louis355 - your about right on the cost of those TR mirrors. Occasionally one or two used ones turn up on ebay, but not very often. I would expect to pay $600 or so for a used one.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Well, I did what I probably shouldn't have done... I tossed the trailer idea, and decided to drive the car back. I wasn't convinced that I'd be able to fit the vehicle in the trailer, and didn't want to trust the rest of the journey to a shipping company. Recognizing that this was likely irresponsible, I convinced my mechanic to fly out with me and drive back - reasoning that having a capable hand aboard would be helpful. Not sure why - I can't imagine him removing the engine on the side of the Coquihala freeway, but it seemed logical at the time. He was thrilled to come along.

Frankly, it couldn't have turned out better. The car was running when we arrived (the crew at the depot were just rearranging some cars), and the staff there were friendly and very careful. Getting out of the taxi and hearing the rumble of those 12 cylinders reduced the anxiety somewhat.

Unfortunately, the car had been damaged in shipping - the Pininfarina emblem had been knocked off the passenger side of the car and there was a small scrape along the bottom trim. Clearly, somebody loading the car overseas didn't read this thread, and didn't expect the rear of the car to be so much wider than the front! Obviously, I was irritated by this, but in balance, if there was to have been a scrape anywhere, this is likely the least difficult spot on the car to repair without too much difficulty. The cargo yard in Canada was eager to give me a video showing the container being unloaded, and the video footage shows that the damage had already occurred by the time the container arrived here. I'll be making a claim against the shipping company, with no idea as to its prospects of success...

The drive home was incredible. 1200 km on the highway, through the Rocky Mountains. The car handles so beautifully, and was frankly far more comfortable and civilised than I expected. I've done the same drive and been rattled by the suspension on my Porsche 964 - this was entirely more refined. How the engineers manage such wicked handling without rendering the car race-track-undrivable is beyond me, but I'm grateful to their Maranello genius.

The power is breathtaking, and while the gated shifter took some getting used to, I didn't really encounter any driveability issues. I was pretty ginger with the car, though did encounter some convoys of trucks on the undivided highway, and had a blast downshifting to 3rd and powering past them. The handling was excellent, even when we encountered a couple of hours of rain, and both my mechanic and I were amazed not to feel any wind from the logging trucks passing in the opposite direction. The aerodynamics are clearly superior to anything I've driven previously. The gas mileage was, surprisingly, pretty decent. I'll have to get out the calculator, but I'm pretty sure that driving my half ton down the same roads would have cost as much in gas (and it would have been a considerably longer trip...:) )

The only 2 problems I encountered were as follows - the battery light flickered occasionally, usually at lower revs. I tightened both positive and negative battery terminals, and this did seem to make a slight difference, but the problem continued sporadically throughout the drive. I'll be checking the grounds now that the car is home. I also had a problem with the pop-up lights - they popped up without any trouble, but the passenger light would droop, then collapse, and then re-deploy. Generally this process would take anywhere from 20 seconds to a couple of minutes. Not sure how that system works - limit switch, maybe? Slipped a cog on a gear wheel somewhere? I'll investigate, though would welcome any input. The light problems made us err on the side of prudence, and rather than try to push the car through the night, we decided to get some sleep in beautiful Jasper National Park, nestled in the heart of the Rocky Mountains.

I can't believe the reactions I've had to the car. Ferraris aren't exactly a common sight in northern Canada, the way they might be in Southern California, and I've had plenty of gas station chats already. I didn't even try to wipe the grin off my face.

I sure appreciate all of the help I've received from the online Ferrari fraternity I've encountered here, and will post pictures when I get some. I'm looking forward to the next stage (Ferrari ownership, rather than just Ferrari dreaming...)

Thanks again,

Maurice :drive:
 

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congrats from california

Well, I did what I probably shouldn't have done... I tossed the trailer idea, and decided to drive the car back. I wasn't convinced that I'd be able to fit the vehicle in the trailer, and didn't want to trust the rest of the journey to a shipping company. Recognizing that this was likely irresponsible, I convinced my mechanic to fly out with me and drive back - reasoning that having a capable hand aboard would be helpful. Not sure why - I can't imagine him removing the engine on the side of the Coquihala freeway, but it seemed logical at the time. He was thrilled to come along.

Frankly, it couldn't have turned out better. The car was running when we arrived (the crew at the depot were just rearranging some cars), and the staff there were friendly and very careful. Getting out of the taxi and hearing the rumble of those 12 cylinders reduced the anxiety somewhat.

Unfortunately, the car had been damaged in shipping - the Pininfarina emblem had been knocked off the passenger side of the car and there was a small scrape along the bottom trim. Clearly, somebody loading the car overseas didn't read this thread, and didn't expect the rear of the car to be so much wider than the front! Obviously, I was irritated by this, but in balance, if there was to have been a scrape anywhere, this is likely the least difficult spot on the car to repair without too much difficulty. The cargo yard in Canada was eager to give me a video showing the container being unloaded, and the video footage shows that the damage had already occurred by the time the container arrived here. I'll be making a claim against the shipping company, with no idea as to its prospects of success...

The drive home was incredible. 1200 km on the highway, through the Rocky Mountains. The car handles so beautifully, and was frankly far more comfortable and civilised than I expected. I've done the same drive and been rattled by the suspension on my Porsche 964 - this was entirely more refined. How the engineers manage such wicked handling without rendering the car race-track-undrivable is beyond me, but I'm grateful to their Maranello genius.

The power is breathtaking, and while the gated shifter took some getting used to, I didn't really encounter any driveability issues. I was pretty ginger with the car, though did encounter some convoys of trucks on the undivided highway, and had a blast downshifting to 3rd and powering past them. The handling was excellent, even when we encountered a couple of hours of rain, and both my mechanic and I were amazed not to feel any wind from the logging trucks passing in the opposite direction. The aerodynamics are clearly superior to anything I've driven previously. The gas mileage was, surprisingly, pretty decent. I'll have to get out the calculator, but I'm pretty sure that driving my half ton down the same roads would have cost as much in gas (and it would have been a considerably longer trip...:) )

The only 2 problems I encountered were as follows - the battery light flickered occasionally, usually at lower revs. I tightened both positive and negative battery terminals, and this did seem to make a slight difference, but the problem continued sporadically throughout the drive. I'll be checking the grounds now that the car is home. I also had a problem with the pop-up lights - they popped up without any trouble, but the passenger light would droop, then collapse, and then re-deploy. Generally this process would take anywhere from 20 seconds to a couple of minutes. Not sure how that system works - limit switch, maybe? Slipped a cog on a gear wheel somewhere? I'll investigate, though would welcome any input. The light problems made us err on the side of prudence, and rather than try to push the car through the night, we decided to get some sleep in beautiful Jasper National Park, nestled in the heart of the Rocky Mountains.

I can't believe the reactions I've had to the car. Ferraris aren't exactly a common sight in northern Canada, the way they might be in Southern California, and I've had plenty of gas station chats already. I didn't even try to wipe the grin off my face.

I sure appreciate all of the help I've received from the online Ferrari fraternity I've encountered here, and will post pictures when I get some. I'm looking forward to the next stage (Ferrari ownership, rather than just Ferrari dreaming...)

Thanks again,

Maurice :drive:
That sounds like a great trip. Good luck.

HanktheTank
1987 Mondial
 
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