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I have found a 1986 US 328 GTS (Rosso Corsa/Tan) with only 10,000 miles. From what I understand, the car received the majority of its use in the first couple years, being driven very intermittently over the remaining 16 years. All necessary routine maintenance had taken place during that initial period, however nothing has been done since.

* What is the worst that can happen to a car that doesn't receive any use for such a period?
* What would need to be done to ensure no damage is done when the car is started (ie. manually running the oil pump, replacing all belts/hoses/seals).
* As a prospective buyer, does it make sense for me to pay to have the car towed to a local Ferrari shop to have it looked at?
* How much can be diagnosed prior to failure anyway?
* What costs could be incurred for such an operation?
 

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Hi Friendzo - welcome to the forum!!

My honest opinion would be that unless it's really cheap - and I do mean REALLY cheap - I wouldn't even consider it. 16 years is an awful long time.

The 328 was an extremely good seller for Ferrari, and if that's what you really want, you shouldn't have too bad a job finding a low mileage one that's not been so neglected.

Forgive me for assuming anything here - but it seems logical to assume that you'd have to be looking not to spend a great deal of money to consider buying this car. If that's the case, bear in mind that the worst that could happen will be way beyond your worst financial nightmare!

I'd suggest you need to think carefully about this, as with every saving there's exposure to potential financial risk/disaster.
 

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I can agree with Bazil.

Ferrari's need regular attention, if that doesn't happen, the will get problems. And Ferrari-problems are expensive.

I guess no matter what condition it is in, it will need a major service, all belts will have to be changed, and then there will be other mechanical problems I don't know much about, but my bet is they will be there.

If it is cheap, maybe you should let an expert look at it, if it's not and you really want a Ferrari, buy one that has been driven regularly, and had it's maintainance

Welcome to the forum ;)
 

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Hi Friendzo,
Bazil has put it well - the worst case is spending a LOT of money on the car and then giving-up and reselling it for a screaming loss. :eek:

This car COULD be great but is sounds like it belongs in a static collection. Somewhwre where it can be admired for its pristine beauty but never run.

I would be very concerned about damage to the engine internals upon starting. The cylinder bores (which get scraped almost totally clear of oil by the piston rings) have been sitting "dry" for say 15 years and may have surface corrosion. The bearings/journals will have no oil film left in-place. Internal seals and gaskets have been unlubricated for a very long time. Non-metal fuel-system components have been sitting in "stale" fuel, and the clutch plate is possibly bonded to the flywheel.

This car would be a fantastic project to buy and then mechanically strip before running. Most things should be in excellent condition (apart from tha above bits, etc), but I wouldn't run it until I had pulled it down and rebuilt the motor.

Now there's a challenge! :eek:ha: [/b]
 

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Agreed. Without even looking at it I'd say you would be looking at 3,000-5,000 USD to get it back in shape. If the car is a great deal than that shouldn't be a problem. A pre-purchase inspection (ppi) is recommended.
 

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All of the advice above is right on the money. I you still want the car have it towed to shop that is verry famair with Ferrari restration. Have them do a prebuy inspection. That way you will know what its going to cost to make it good again.
John
 
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