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Have you ever wished you had a "homelink" built into your Ferrari to facilitate door opening w/o having openers rolling around in your car?

I did and then did something about it.

I was getting tired of the individual remote routine. I live in a gated community, and then there’s the garage. So, that was two remotes that would always slide under the seat just as you needed them. I really became tired of dealing with these remotes. If you have a 360/430, this might be for you. It could also apply to other Ferraris, but I do not know.

My solution was a MITO homelink Model 60-HOMLVM1 that I purchased on-line from Marwest Access Controls, http://www.aaaremotes.com/gehoviwibe.html. This unit is very compact measuring about 2 ½” W H 3 ½” L X 3/8” thick, has 3 buttons for 3 functions, and it was a total of $ 178.61including shipping, sales tax, and the bezel (see below). They do not keep these units in stock, so it took about a week for them to get it from time of order. There is a metal mounting ring supplied, but you do not need that for the 360/430 install.

So the concern was where to put the unit so that it would properly function but would also look original. I first thought it would fit into the housing for the useless digital clock but quickly found out that would not work due to space and button access.

So I turned the driver’s visor over, and there was a pocket. I slid the remote unit ½ way into the pocket and realized that this was perfect for the remote’s size and was sufficiently snug to hold the unit in place. So, here’s what I did.

I popped out the interior light/switch panel under the Clock housing. With a Torx driver removed the 3 screws that hold the housing in place, dropped it down, pulled out the wire connector, separated it, and put down the housing. I then unscrewed and removed the visor and its right side holder.

I turned over the visor with the pocket facing upwards, slid the remote unit in within about an inch form the end of the pocket, and carefully pushed in the leather with one finger over each of the three button openings so the leather was marked with their location. I used a very sharp single-edge blade to cut a small slit into each depression, and then used a small diagonal cutter to cut a diamond shape opening in each of the three depressions.

There is a neopreme button assembly that goes from the outside and under the bezel into the 3 holes to activate each of the three remote functions. Please note that on the neopreme part there is another small hole required for the visual aspect of the built-in programming LED. W/O this you can’t program! You’ll see this on the bezel as well. It can only go on one way for everything to work. So, that hole must be cut as well.

You must order the plastic finish bezel that goes over the neopreme part when you order the remote device. I purchased blue to match my interior, but the bottom of the visor is black. So, order a black bezel. It looks better.

There are two more small holes required on either side of the 3 larger button holes through which the bezel legs go that snap into place and hold the neopreme button assembly and the whole remote assembly in place.

There is a small 2-wire plug that snaps into the remote assembly for DC power. I in-line soldered two #20 leads about 2’ long to these and then shrink wrapped the soldered connections.

The pocket is sewn into the visor. So on the upper corner towards the visor mount, I very carefully again used the single-edge blade, raised two stitches with a very small screw driver, and then cut the two threads using the knife blade as the surface for the cuts. This made a snug opening through which I fed the 2 #20 power leads. I also fed the 2 lines through a loose 4” length of small shrink wrap to hide the wire and to protect it through the mounting hole.

Feeling secure that the neopreme part allowed the buttons to depress w/o resistance, I attached the power connector to the remote unit, fed the wires through that small opening in the pocket I had made, pushed in the remote unit so the holes were all lined up, placed the neopreme button assembly over the cut leather, and put the bezel over that. Holding the whole visor I pushed in each of the 2 sides of the bezel very carefully one at a time until I heard it snap into place. Voila. The unit was perfectly held in place, the buttons worked fine, and now I was ready to install the visor.

You will notice that the base of the swivel mount for the visor protrudes into an overhead steel beam that runs along the front of the windshield. You cannot run the wire into there as there is no outlet near the lamp housing! I then cut a small tab, with my small diags, in the visor mount hole panel that is leather covered to allow room for the wires to pass w/o binding. I put a small piece of electrical tape on the end of the two power leads to hold them together for easier feed, then carefully pulled down the leather trim piece there at the visor mount hole, fed the wire between the leather panel and the beam towards the windshield, over to the light/clock housing area. I then pushed a bit of wire back into the visor pocket to leave enough in case I have to remove the device, carefully feed the excess wire while holding the visor closer to the mount, pulled the excess from the open light panel area, made sure that the wire through the hole had the loose shrink wrap going under the visor mount base, and then installed the two visor mount screws and the visor clip mount. You have to leave a small loop of wire at that swivel point so the visor will twist and move towards the driver’s door window as and when needed.

Ok so at this point I have everything is in place, now I need power for the unit. That's where the lamp housing comes into play. You will notice that the contacts for the light assembly are tin leads. I cleaned a small area in the red and black tin contact leads, put fresh solder on each and let it flow, then soldered the respective leads from the device. Red to red and black to black. The other two wires are for backlighting of the clock and door entry lighting circuit. There is now power all the time to the remote device. I arranged neatly the excess wire, pushed the plug from the lamp assembly into the vehicle plug, loosely put the 3 mounting screws in place to hold the lamp assembly, and tested the remote by programming it. Bingo it worked beautifully!

I then secured the housing, reattached the light panel, and drove around testing the unit. It works absolutely fantastically!

I can tell you that upon completion it looks as if it came from Ferrari! Try it. You’ll like it, and no more loose remotes! I am just absolutely pleased. See the photos. Happy to answer any questions.

And you can do this to any Ferrari!
 

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6,209 Posts
can you shoot those pics into space so my Hubble can focus better?
 

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ah, NOW I can see them.
 
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