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When looking around the auto market over the past couple of weeks, I was struck by the following general prices:

Ferrari 365GTB/4 Daytona Euro 200k-270k
Ferrari 330 GTC Euro 180k-220k
Porsche 959 Euro 150k-200k
Jaguar XJ220 Euro 120k-150k

clearly the 1st two are very different ownership experiences from the 2nd pair. However the 2nd pair are clearly supercars with stunning performance. All are long beyond depreciation, so your ownership costs are insurance, maintenance, and which way the market moves. Of the 4, the Jag had the highest initial purchase cost and now qualifies as the "Budget" option.

So the question is, of the 4, which offers the best appreciation potential in the next 2-3 years?
 

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When looking around the auto market over the past couple of weeks, I was struck by the following general prices:

Ferrari 365GTB/4 Daytona Euro 200k-270k
Ferrari 330 GTC Euro 180k-220k
Porsche 959 Euro 150k-200k
Jaguar XJ220 Euro 120k-150k

clearly the 1st two are very different ownership experiences from the 2nd pair. However the 2nd pair are clearly supercars with stunning performance. All are long beyond depreciation, so your ownership costs are insurance, maintenance, and which way the market moves. Of the 4, the Jag had the highest initial purchase cost and now qualifies as the "Budget" option.

So the question is, of the 4, which offers the best appreciation potential in the next 2-3 years?
Or the lowest depreciation potential:D
- The Jag seems to be totally out of favor pobably also my its special design and presence.
- The Porsche is and was a great car but can be replicated easy by the newer 911 Turbos for even much cheaper money.
- The 330 GTC and the Daytona both look phantastic, have a great heritage and can not be duplicated (except by a other classic V12 ferrari).

Summarizing, the 2 cars which appreciated so far greatly over the other pair (I would guess) will most likely do so further out in the future on relative terms.
 

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I think the value on a 330GTC can only go up.
 

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What I understood is the 959's are about to get popular in the Porsche inner circle's...
It seems both the daytona and 330 GTC prices exploded the last year so further (spectacular) appreciation is unlikely.

Personally, in an odd way, I really like the crazy, big, heavy XJ220. Very very fast....OK probebly only in straight line...but who cares...for quick handling there are F cars around:)

But I go for the 959.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
What I understood is the 959's are about to get popular in the Porsche inner circle's...
It seems both the daytona and 330 GTC prices exploded the last year so further (spectacular) appreciation is unlikely.

Personally, in an odd way, I really like the crazy, big, heavy XJ220. Very very fast....OK probebly only in straight line...but who cares...for quick handling there are F cars around:)

But I go for the 959.
I don't think the XJ220 does corners but it is hugely fast in a straight line. On one of the Top Gear episodes a few years ago a XJ220 easily out ran a Zonda in the quarter mile.

On the 959, really don't know that much about them. Prices are almost exactly the same as they were when it was first introduced. I have heard the service costs are stunning, even by Ferrari standards.
 

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One of my ultimate garages would be the F40 and the 959 for a number of reasons:

1. They both had very limited production runs and were quite literally the "poster boys" of their era.
2. They still offer mad performance even by today's standards. If one consides the advances in technology, other cars such as say a current Golf GTi are miles ahead in terms of technology and performance as opposed to the mid-80's forebearers.
3. They offer two very different approaches to achieving the objective of creating the best possible peformance car. The Ferrari was a back-to-basics race car and the Porsche used the most progressive technology available.
4. Between the two cars, the full spectrum of usage is catered for from daily driver status to out-and-out track car.


Overall, I would definitely add the 959 to my collection (and hopefully will one day).
 

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The 959 is an icon and set the template for Porsche turbos from the 993 onwards to the latest 997 Turbo. It is very fast, especially with the factory 550 hp option. Only about 283 built, each one sold at a huge loss to Porsche. Good racing pedigree with victory in the Paris Dakar and a seventh (I think) at Le Mans. So a rare, iconic car from Porsche with good racing pedigree seems like a sound investment. However I believe that the running costs are astronomical, even by Ferrari standards.

The prices shown for the four options, make the 550 Barchetta seem like a relative bargain.

As an investment that I would not drive too often, I would go for the 959.

As a car to cruise around Europe in and probably never sell, it would be the Daytona for me.
 

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So the question is, of the 4, which offers the best appreciation potential in the next 2-3 years?
Given the recent discussions about how high the prices of mid-range Ferraris are, one would expect a 'correction' (as has also been discussed) in the short-medium term. So not knowing as much about Porsches or Jaguars as I used to, I was wondering if the 959 and the XJ220 have also been 'overvalued' as part of the general trend in price increases?

If not, then I would head for the nearest 959 stockist (funds permitting hahaha!). My instinct would say that the prices are not going to appreciate substantially in the near future (2-3 years), but may well appreciate in the longer term as the rarity value increases.

I was wondering, does anyone know how many 365GTB/4's and 330GTC's are still around?


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PS spotted a beautiful Nero 599 GTB (08 plate) today :) It was dirty though :mad:


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Discussion Starter #10

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If not, then I would head for the nearest 959 stockist (funds permitting hahaha!). My instinct would say that the prices are not going to appreciate substantially in the near future (2-3 years), but may well appreciate in the longer term as the rarity value increases.

I was wondering, does anyone know how many 365GTB/4's and 330GTC's are still around?

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Probably 1100 Daytonas and 400 330 GTCs. I would assume a 80-85% survival rate.

Here is the 959 which caught my attention:

http://www.kidston.com/WORLD-CLASSIC-CAR-EXPERTISE/images/stories/PDF/1988 porsche 959_grey.pdf
 

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Probably 1100 Daytonas and 400 330 GTCs. I would assume a 80-85% survival rate.

Here is the 959 which caught my attention:

http://www.kidston.com/WORLD-CLASSIC-CAR-EXPERTISE/images/stories/PDF/1988 porsche 959_grey.pdf
Dear Boxer
As I understand, on this 959 some "changes" occured which may make that specific car more attractiv drivingwise but definitively not "originality" wise. If I remember correct, you are a person which put's very much emphasis to the originality of a car (no change of braking system of F40 etc.), therefore this specific car may not really be of interest to you, isn't it ?;)
 

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This EB110 has been on the market for a very long time without any takers. Carrs Ferrari in Exeter had it for over a year. These seem to be even less loved then even the Jag XJ220. EB110 looks are really an acquired taste.
I think that Verdi's had it up for sale a couple of years ago too, agree that it's looks are an acquired taste, and for that money you are definitely better off with a Daytona
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Dear Boxer
As I understand, on this 959 some "changes" occured which may make that specific car more attractiv drivingwise but definitively not "originality" wise. If I remember correct, you are a person which put's very much emphasis to the originality of a car (no change of braking system of F40 etc.), therefore this specific car may not really be of interest to you, isn't it ?;)
You are very right, the 959 is not really of personal interest. I very much plan to stick to Ferraris.
 

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Probably 1100 Daytonas and 400 330 GTCs. I would assume a 80-85% survival rate.

Here is the 959 which caught my attention:

http://www.kidston.com/WORLD-CLASSIC-CAR-EXPERTISE/images/stories/PDF/1988 porsche 959_grey.pdf

I think the 959 is an interesting investment proposition. I was scanning a few websites and found a few 959s for sale. What is interesting is the variance in asking prices. I just took a cursory glance so I am not sure what the main differential factor is, maybe mileage? The other thing that is interesting is that for a car with such a low production run there are so many available. Perhaps that is something to do with the 'extremely limited' access to the US market that other comparative vehicles do not suffer from or an indication that Porsche buyers are fickle? :eek: or just percieved image?

I know the 959 was a technological tour de force of its era, but I was wondering today whether it would be like comparing 'solid state' technology with a 'PCB' (let alone the micro processor). Having said that, it would be interesting to see from a drivers perspective if it pushes the right buttons. I think one would really need to get behind the wheel, I can imagine it would feel raw compared to modern 993'6'7s but not as raw as a F40.

Ownership would also place one in esteemed company, I think Bill, Steve and Jay also keep 959's ;)



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Discussion Starter #16
I know the 959 was a technological tour de force of its era, but I was wondering today whether it would be like comparing 'solid state' technology with a 'PCB' (let alone the micro processor). Having said that, it would be interesting to see from a drivers perspective if it pushes the right buttons. I think one would really need to get behind the wheel, I can imagine it would feel raw compared to modern 993'6'7s but not as raw as a F40.
Octane did an article comparing the F40 to the 959 a few months ago. The passion int he text was clearly on driving the F40. The description on the 959 was all very rationale.
 
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