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I was wondering if anyone on this site would be able to help point me in the right direction of where I would need to go to become a certified Ferrari mechanic? Next year I will be training for my ASE certificate and from there I will go on to more performance oriented schools. My main goal is to work with ferrari's and like cars but I havent been able to find any information on a Ferrari training course. Can any one out there help me?

Thanks,
Chris

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I am not sure I can offer much help. I am a Master ASE Tech and a Master Toyota Tech. I know....I know...........damn ricer crap. Hey, what can I say.........it pays the bills. But even with a big company that sells millions of cars a year, there are only two ways to get factory Toyota training. The first is to attend a T-Ten college. T-Ten is Toyota's training program for college students. The second is to get hired at a Toyota dealership as an apprentice and attend as many factory training schools as your employer will allow.

Now with Ferrari, there will be no college option. But you are on the right track with your ASE Certification. ASE is not the holy grail, but it does help to get your foot in the door. At least you can prove a level of knowledge beyond the average shade tree wanna-be. The difficult L-1 emissions test provides a very positive aspect to a resume. Remember, Ferrari dealerships are located in major metropolitan areas, and with more and more counties adding emissions testing, knowledge in this area is VERY valuable. The thing you will need to realize is that most of your work in a dealership will revolve around warranty repair and MIL lights. All manufacturers face the same problem. Electronic diagnosis is the key. Scan tool acumen and gas analyzer acumen are premium attributes.

The other alternative is to apprentice with an independent that specializes in Ferrari's. The same difficulties apply as in the dealership, in having prior experience. But in my experience, independents seem more likely to take a chance on a new tech.

You will have to start at the bottom of the salary chain. There is just no other way. A top master tech in a major city, with aggressive service writers, can make over $100K a year. Realistically, about half that is the national median income for skilled technicians. Ferrari techs do not necessarily make a larger income. The key is quantity of work. Some Ferrari techs work on salary, but some work on commission. Makes a big difference on your POTENTIAL income.

You might contact Ferrari North America and see what options are available. It is possible that FNA has apprenticeships available, or know of dealers actively seeking technicians.

good luck

steven
 
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