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Discussion Starter #1
I wonder if any Forum members have any knowledge of early Ferrari's that have been in Africa (and even cars still there). I am specifically interested in pre 1975 cars, 250s, 275s, 365s etc. I am building up a database of classic/collectors cars owned in South Africa, Rhodesia/Zimbabwe and Kenya though I would be interested to hear of Ferrari's in other African countries too.

To date I have around 40 cars listed for South Africa ranging from 166Inter to Daytona's, some have yet to be identified by chassis number though. I have seven cars listed for Rhodesia/Zimbabwe but none have been identified by chassis number and one Ferrari for Kenya, Dino 308GT4 chassis 13066.

I (and other members I am sure) would be grateful for any info/photo's of cars owned in Africa.

Regards

Wayne
 

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The older cars are pretty scarce here. The only really old car is a 166 Barchetta (I find out the exact details if you like). Its owner comes to the annual track day each year and leads the parade lap - with his dog in the passenger seat usually.

The older cars that are here are in the main 246 Dinos, 365/512BB, 365GTB4 and there was at one point a beautiful 275 GTB (I took photos of it when it came to Cape Town in 1997 for a local Ferrari tour). There are also some 250 GTEs and similar.

There really isn't anything crazy in terms of collectibles (except 3 F40s, 2 F50s, 2 Enzos and one 288 GTO).

One problem is our currency - it devalued quite heavily from 2001 to 2004 (about a 50% erosion) and during that time, it meant that many cars became quite attractive to export and I know of a couple of cars, not only Ferraris, that have been sent overseas. Interestingly, our currency has recovered almost all of the losses it suffered during that period.

Bringing cars into South Africa is also problematic on two counts namely that left hand drive cars can no longer be imported legally and that the import duties on cars are as much as 60% of the value of the car.

South African cars are typically attractive to foreign buyers as most of the cars were concentrated around Johannesburg, which is at 6,000 ft above sea level and hence rust is virtually non-existent on our cars.

I originally come from Zimbabwe/Rhodesia and still know people there. I wouldn't expect that there are any Ferraris left there owing to the dire turmoil the country is in. Having said that, a "barn find" might be possible.

I will try to get some information on SEFAC (Southern Equitorial Ferrari Automobili Club) that was started in the 1960s and will post it.

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Just interestingly, I actually saw that 250 GTE stopped on the side of the highway when there was gridlock about a month ago. I was in the 308 and wanted to stop but was two lanes away and couldn't get over. I wondered whether there was a problem of if it was just preventative given the slow traffic.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks to those who have replied so far, I look forward to any more info in due course. - Schumacher I have replied privately to you as well.

Thanks

Wayne
:drive:
 

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Just interestingly, I actually saw that 250 GTE stopped on the side of the highway when there was gridlock about a month ago. I was in the 308 and wanted to stop but was two lanes away and couldn't get over. I wondered whether there was a problem of if it was just preventative given the slow traffic.
My guess and hope is that it was preventative. Both the 250 GTE and 330 GT 2+2s can really struggle these days with the heat if caught in traffic. Several of the owners I have talked to have had problems with fans and radiators.
 
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