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Discussion Starter #1
Does someone out there have information if the 91 octane at the pump is adequate for the 360 full throttle application? Does anyone know what octane rating is used to produce the factory hp and torq. Please be specific with R or M or the average ratings.

Thanks a Bunch!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
phatdiablo said:
im sure it would be a minimum 98RON
it is for most sports cars. just remember the fuel quality varies between countries.
Thanks for your reply! I noticed in the owners manual Ferrari specify "Unleaded fuel 95 O.N." Doesn't say if it is the research or Motor number. I wonder if that's the number in Italy???

I am surprised no one has experienced with this so far. The low octane rating at the pump could severly damper HP and Torq and could damage engine at full throttle openings for extended periods.

Cheers,
 

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Well I wrote a post yesterday, but it doesn't look like it worked. A fuel knock rating of 91 in the US should be adequate for most Ferraris under most driving applications. Most modern engine management computers make adjustments for a small octane difference (i.e. 3 points). If you were to take your Ferrari out for a track day, you are going to want to use the fuel that satisfies the instructions in your manual. You could do this through additives or by using racing fuel. Also, I believe the pump estimate in the US is determined by a different method than the Ferrari manual refers to (formula below). You can check out this great reference.

Interesting quotes:

"The correct name for the (RON+MON)/2 formula is the "antiknock index",
and it remains the most important quality criteria for motorists."

"When the combined effects of air temperature and humidity are considered, it is often possible to use one octane grade in summer, and use a lower octane rating in winter."

"A modern engine management system can compensate for altitude, ambient air, temperature, and fuel octane. The management system will also control cold start settings, and other operational parameters."

"In general, modern engine management systems will compensate for fuel octane, and once you have satisfied the optimum octane requirement, you are at the optimum overall performance area of the engine map."

"If the octane is distributed differently throughout the boiling range of a fuel, then engines can knock on one brand of 87 (RON+MON)/2, but not on another brand. This "octane distribution" is especially important when sudden changes in load occur, such as high load, full throttle, acceleration."

--Why Schumacher uses Shell gasoline. Ok, so he likes the hat too.--
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thaks Azzurro, I have had a chance to talk with Rockt racing fuel and he suggested similar situation. Since I drive my 360 mostly under full throttle conditions I got worried and wanted to make sure I can compensate for it by mixing racing fuel in my tank. He did suggest to run a few tests that I am not able to do with the information I have today. He suggested to run the car from 30 - 60 MPH or there about in one gear under full thorottle (if that constitudes to highest torq output, in the case of 360 I don't know???) and time the car with different mixtures to come up with the optimum octane rating in the tank. He said he ran this with his own car and found a 4 to 1 mixture of 91 and 100 octane respectively will give him the optimum time and anymore than that i.e. more than 25% mixture of 100 octane will cost money w/o any gain for the engine. I am going to start experimenting this in a few days and will report the results.
Thanks again for your input.

Cheers,
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Azzurro California,

I just had an opportunity to read through the reference site you had forwarded. Great material, I enjoyed reading through most of it.
Long ago when I bought my first hot rod (68 Camero SS) with 396 cu.in and pop up pistons (12:1 compression)... We knew that ignition was set too advanced when the engine knocked, what I didn't know was that dialing the timing back (retarding) leads to lower octane requirement. So, when we were racing, we would get out, advance the timing, do the race and then dial it back to normal... GREAT reference matrail! Thanks.
 

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Fantastic; I am glad I could help. I thought the FAQ was incredibly informative. I am sure that answered most questions you have. Answers to such specific questions are usually quite difficult to find on the net. If you are running your car under maximum engine requirements, you want to make sure you achieve Ferrari's recommendation for octane. Using premium, you won't seriously damage your engine, but I am sure 91 fuel is not good for it under maximum conditions. Otherwise, I would say it would be fine. I'd say 75% of drivers don't need racing fuel. Only if you are running your car to the absolute maximum conditions.
 

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In Europe, 355 and 550 are both spec'd to run on 95 RON, while some other cars such as the BMW M3, Audi S4 biturbo do require 98 RON to reach advertised performance.
Would be surprised it was any different for the 360, considering the scarcity of 98 RON in some countries.
 
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