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Need some help from you guys, my car (F355) broke down on Sunday and i had towed the car to Next Car (the sole dealer of Ferrari in my country). The mechanic there told me that the alternator is faulty and would have to replace it. The cost of the alternator is USD 1,000.00 excluding labor cost. Any comment on the price? Is there any other source that i could get it cheaper? Any help would be much appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Boxer i need some guidance again i am a complete idiot when comes to car.

My version is a 1995 F355 F1 Spider, so it's a 355 (2.7 Motronic) or 355 (5.7 Motronic)?? Thank you again!
 

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Zffxr48c000107425
Definitely a 1997. RHD.

Here is a general decoder that I have collected from assorted sources:

The 1st digit Z = Italy
The 2nd digit identifies the badge. F = Ferrari
The 3rd digit identifies the manufacturer. F = Ferrari
The 4th digit identifies the engine.
A = 308 2-valve injected USA
A = Testarossa European
A = 612 Scaglietti
B = 308 2-valve carb wet sump Euro
B = 408 prototype
B = 575M Maranello
C = 308 2-valve carb dry sump Euro
C = 328 Swiss w/catalyst 1987-1989
C = Enzo Ferrari
D = 512 BB
D = Challenge Stradale
E = 400i
E = PPG prototype
F = 308 2-valve carb Australia
F = 348 USA 1989-1990
G = 308 2-valve carb USA & Japan
G = F40 Euro
H = 308 2-valve injected Euro
I = Not used
J = 512 BBi
K = 208 Turbocharged
K = 348 Euro early
L = 308 QV Euro
L = 512 TR
M = 308 QV USA 1983
M = F40 USA
N = 308 2-valve injected Australia
O = Not used
P = 288 GTO
P = 355 w/Motronic 2.7
Q = Not used
R = 308 QV Australian
R = 348 USA
S = Testarossa USA & Japan
S = 456 w/Motronic 2.7
T = Testarossa
T = F50
U = 308 QV USA 1984-1985
U = 348 Euro late
V = F512 M
W = 328 Euro
W = 456M w/Motronic 5.2
X = 328 USA & Japan
X = 355 w/Motronic 5.2
Y = 412
Y = 360
Z = 550

The 5th digit is used for seatbelts/airbag system
A = 3-point inertia belts with auto retractors for front
B = 3-point inertia belts with auto retractors for front plus 3-point non-inertia belts for rear
C = 3-point inertia belts with auto retractors for front plus 2-point inertia belts for rear
D = 3-point inertia belts with auto retractors for front plus 3-point inertia belts for rear
E = Seen on some 2+2 for Australian market; no airbag?
G = Passive restraint system (Active belts with manual lap belts)
J = Seen on Euro F40
K = Seen on >1990 Mondial T Cabriolet US versions
L = Air bags, manual seat belts plus UCRA* in the rear seats
M = Passive restraint system (Canada)
N = Automatic passive restraint system
P = Air bags with 3-point inertia belts for front and inertia belts for rear
R = Air bags, manual seat belts and force limiter
S = Air bags, manual seat belts plus UCRA*
T = Air bags, manual seat belts with pretensioners
U = Air bags, manual seat belts with pretensioners plus UCRA*
V = Air bags, manual seat belts with pretensioners and force limiter plus UCRA*
W = Air bags, manual seat belts and force limiter plus UCRA*
X = Seen on racecars and prototypes
Y = Seen on Euro 612 Scaglietti
Z = Seen on Euro Enzo Ferrari
* UCRA = Universal Child Restraint Anchorage system

The 6th & 7th digit identify to specific model
01 = 308 GT4 (ZDF)
01 = 308 GTBi (ZFF)
02 = 308 GTSi
03 = 308 GTB
04 = 308 GTS
05 = 512 BB
06 = 400i Automatic
07 = 400i 5-speed
08 = Mondial 8
09 = 512 BBi
10 = 208 GTB Turbo
11 = 208 GTS Turbo
12 = 308 GTB QV
13 = 308 GTS QV
14 = Mondial QV Coupe
15 = Mondial QV Cabriolet
16 = 288 GTO
17 = Testarossa
18 = 308 Convertible
19 = 328 GTB
20 = 328 GTS
21 = 3.2 Mondial Coupe
22 = Unknown
23 = Unknown
24 = 412 Automatic
25 = 412 5-speed
26 = 3.2 Mondial Cabriolet
27 = GTB Turbo
28 = GTS Turbo
29 = 328 Convertible
30 = Testarossa Spider
31 = Unknown
32 = Mondial T Coupe
33 = Mondial T Cabriolet
34 = F40
35 = 348 TB, GTB & GTC
36 = 348 TS & GTS
37 = 408
38 = Unknown
39 = Unknown
40 = 512 TR & F512 M
41 = F355 & 355 F1 Berlinetta
42 = F355 & 355 F1 GTS
43 = 348 Spider
44 = 456 GT & 456M GT
45 =
46 = F50
47 =
48 = F355 & 355 F1 Spider
49 = 550 Maranello
50 = 456 GTA & 45M GTA
51 = 360 Modena & Modena F1
52 = 550 Barchetta Pininfarina
53 = 360 Spider & Spider F1
54 = 612 Scaglietti
55 = 575M Maranello & Maranello F1
56 = Enzo Ferraro
57 = Challenge Stradale

The 8th digit is for the market the car was manufactured for:
A = LHD North America
B = LHD European
C = RHD UK
D = RHD Australia
J = LHD Japan (also JAP or JPN)
S = LHD Sweden or Switzerland
T = LHD Middle East
X = Other (oneoffs, prototypes & race cars)

The 9th digit is a USA CHECK DIGIT for Ferraris for markets other than North America this digit is always a 0 except for Japan where it may be an A or a P.
The 10th digit designates the model year and is used only on Ferraris manufactured for the North American and some Middle East markets. On cars for other markets this will always be a "0" (zero) except for Japan where it sometimes will be a "P" or "N".
A = 1980
B = 1981
C = 1982
D = 1983
E = 1984
F = 1985
G = 1986
H = 1987
I = Not used
J = 1988
K = 1989
L = 1990
M = 1991
N = 1992
O = Not used
P = 1993
Q = Not used
R = 1994
S = 1995
T = 1996
U = Not used
V = 1997
W = 1998
X = 1999
Y = 2000
Z = Not used
1 = 2001
2 = 2002
3 = 2003
4 = 2004

The 11th digit designates the assembly plant which for Ferrari is always Maranello = 0
The 12th -17th digits are the chassis/serial number
 

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My auto elec installed and externally mounted regulator to stop my alternator failing. he put it in the wheel arch near the radiator so that it didn't get the heat from the headers. it hasn't failed since.

alternatively, the alternator is the same as one used on another cheaper car and can be sourced much cheaper that ferrari price. it, like the ferrari one, will also fail regularly, but it does it cheaper :)

i'm afraid i don't recall what the other car/model is.
 

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alternatively, the alternator is the same as one used on another cheaper car and can be sourced much cheaper that ferrari price. it, like the ferrari one, will also fail regularly, but it does it cheaper :)

i'm afraid i don't recall what the other car/model is.
This is fairly common. The cooling fan temp switch on a F40 is the same tha was used on the VW Golf. Ferrari charges $80 for it and you can source it from VW for $6.

We should try to compile a master list of all the interchangable parts.
 

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I picked this up from another site and and saved it. It might be of help:
=================================================================

F355 alternator rebuild update, with part numbers. 10/13/2006

I have successfully improved the F355 Nippondenso alternator. It would have taken one day, but I was sent on a wild goose chase by a defective-out-of-the-box regulator.

The parts to buy are:
A regulator, brand name Regitar, part number VRH2005-4A
A rectifier (optional), which needs a minor mod, Regitar RN-02

The only place I found that sells them online is
http://www.holcombedirect.com/browse.cfm/2,55.html

The defective part I bought was a Transpo IN220, and during my visit to the alternator dyno, they told me that they had occasional trouble with Transpo (assembled in Costa Rica) and had the best results with Regitar (says made in USA on the box fwiw)

Dyno of totally stock alternator was 13.6 volts at 139 amps for 5 minutes.
Dyno of improved alternator was 14.1 volts at 161 amps for 5 minutes.

The gains are more from the regulator than the rectifier, we tested both.

The goal however is increased reliability. The VRH2005-4A regulator has some features that the stock one does not have in terms of circuitry to prevent shorts or failure when confronted by a battery, belt or wiring problem. The RN-02 rectifier, which is where the diodes turn AC into DC, is very heavy duty. The new rectifier is all copper instead of steel, welded diodes instead of soldered, thicker mount for the battery stud. The 6mm battery stud from the new regulator needs to be replaced with the 8mm stud from the original rectifier. This is reversible for future concours, where the rectifier part numbers must be original.

I also replaced all the tiny cheesy screws with allen bolts, which made life much easier. They are all 4mm x 0.7 pitch, and I needed 3 for the regulator 5mm long, 4 for the diodes 5mm long, and 2 for the regulator case at 20mm long. The local hardware store didn't have 5mm allens, so I shortened some 10mm ones on a sander.
 

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I picked this up from another site and and saved it. It might be of help:
=================================================================

F355 alternator rebuild update, with part numbers. 10/13/2006

I have successfully improved the F355 Nippondenso alternator. It would have taken one day, but I was sent on a wild goose chase by a defective-out-of-the-box regulator.

The parts to buy are:
A regulator, brand name Regitar, part number VRH2005-4A
A rectifier (optional), which needs a minor mod, Regitar RN-02

The only place I found that sells them online is
http://www.holcombedirect.com/browse.cfm/2,55.html

The defective part I bought was a Transpo IN220, and during my visit to the alternator dyno, they told me that they had occasional trouble with Transpo (assembled in Costa Rica) and had the best results with Regitar (says made in USA on the box fwiw)

Dyno of totally stock alternator was 13.6 volts at 139 amps for 5 minutes.
Dyno of improved alternator was 14.1 volts at 161 amps for 5 minutes.

The gains are more from the regulator than the rectifier, we tested both.

The goal however is increased reliability. The VRH2005-4A regulator has some features that the stock one does not have in terms of circuitry to prevent shorts or failure when confronted by a battery, belt or wiring problem. The RN-02 rectifier, which is where the diodes turn AC into DC, is very heavy duty. The new rectifier is all copper instead of steel, welded diodes instead of soldered, thicker mount for the battery stud. The 6mm battery stud from the new regulator needs to be replaced with the 8mm stud from the original rectifier. This is reversible for future concours, where the rectifier part numbers must be original.

I also replaced all the tiny cheesy screws with allen bolts, which made life much easier. They are all 4mm x 0.7 pitch, and I needed 3 for the regulator 5mm long, 4 for the diodes 5mm long, and 2 for the regulator case at 20mm long. The local hardware store didn't have 5mm allens, so I shortened some 10mm ones on a sander.
Great post :)! I actually rebuilt my alternator with those exact parts just for the hell of it, since I was down there changing the belt tensioner assembly anyway .... :D
 
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