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I'm thinking about writing a guide to buying Vintage Ferraris and would like some opinions on what to look for when buying a vintage Ferrari and how it compares to shopping for a more modern (1980's or newer) Ferrari.
 

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The process is slow, not like buying an F355 where there are 100s and you can have most specialist take a look at it. Vintage Ferraris have fewer specialist to inspect the car, which makes it harder.

Also note that the Vintage cars are often well documented depending on the year. A 250 GTO, LM or GT for that matter has no problems selling as they all have history and are well known. The 330s are where you have to be a little more careful.
 

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Andrew,
first of all a Happy New Year to all,
I think for buying a classic the difference with the more recent one is:
it's a seller's market instead of the buyer's market for the modern ones, you have lesser choice and the seller is sometimes the deciding party.
When looking for a classic Ferrari a lot of patience, travelling and gutt feeling is involved.
Buying a classic can be a money pit, there are no cheap ones around in the end. Either you go for a car that's OK in all senses, the money you put in afterwards is less. Or you go for a car which demands some imput (work and capital) from yourself, labour rates at specialised workshops are high, as so are prices for the pieces.
As MOMO pointed out the well known cars as 250TR, 250GTO, LM, and such wouldn't be a problem regarding servicing, maintenance, ... as these were well taken care of by their owners who are seeing their car as a piece of art, but also as an investment. It's more of a problem when you start looking for a more 'mass' produced classic like 330, GTE, even Daytonas.
Jurgen
 

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The 1st step in the process is finding out as much as you can about the particular model you are interested in, talk to as many owners as you can, visit a few specialist dealers, and find a reliable mechanic. Then you should start a slow patient process of looking for the right car.
 

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buying process

I concurr with the BOXER, first thing is research, sifting through publications and authoritative info sources. Sercond is make it clear as to what you are looking for, V12 front loaded, mid-loaded, V6s, they are all different in purpose and character. Maybe you only want a particular vintage because you like the design and form and simply wish to keep it in your garage to stare at it with your mouth open. Followed by reliable expertise and support and finally some cash to buy it. Jimmy
 

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buying vintage cars vs modern ones

Let me add that one can make a general distinction between modern vs vintage. I put all the injection ones in modern and carburator ones in the vintage. This is analogous to modern electric trains vs old steam locomotives. The modern ones may be more fast and powerful, but at the same time you feel like the chips are doing the work and make you feel like you are "being driven" by the car. Vintage cars may be not as fast, not as comfortable, not as luxurious, but they are hand made and the feel is like you are controlling the car. The sound of carburators and chains and all that raises your awareness of driving a car. Its not that which is better. Its what you are looking for. I have great time with my Dino 246GT which is 36 years old. It was hand made up till 1970 when Ferrari started mass produciton. 246GT Type M and E fall in this latter. Jimmy
 
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