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I am going to look at a very clean looking car this weekend. I have a highly recommended Ferrari mechanic who can perform a PPI. My question is, if this mechanic recommends that I do the full belt change and finds several other items that should be replaced, adjusted, and I do these, would I then be able to deem this car as sorted and sell it in the future where buyers would be comfortable feeling that it has been sorted with an acceptable service history?
 

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Ferrari service records are important to most buyers, but not all.

"Sorted" is one of those terms that can have various meanings... Some might even suggest that these cars never get fully sorted.

Have your mechanic perform the PPI and then if you address every item he finds, then yes, I would consider the car sorted.

However, for conversation, let's say the car has OEM headers and you do a smoke test and find they are fine (no cracks, leaks, etc). No need to replace then now. Well, given header failure is a known issue, if you claim the car is sorted but has original headers, many will say it's not, regardless if they have not yet failed.

And, the records are nice to show the history of the car and if it was well cared for. But, if the belts did not break and you do the belt service, it really does not matter how many times they have been done prior.

If the car is solid and the price is right, don't lose to much sleep over the lack of records - just realize when you go to sell the potential buyer might want to perform more due diligence than if you had full records.
 

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Ferrari service records are important to most buyers, but not all.

If the car is solid and the price is right, don't lose to much sleep over the lack of records - just realize when you go to sell the potential buyer might want to perform more due diligence than if you had full records.

A well documented history is generally a sign the car has been well cared for.
Lack of history may, repeat may, indicate the opposite. Even with a recent service and PPI, lack of records will make it hard to determine how the car has been treated.

But I agree Dave, without service records I'd have still bought my Spider, but as you say, with a lot more scrutiny. However, had it been a 355, I'd have passed. But that's just a reflection of my own risk tolerance.
 

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A well documented history is generally a sign the car has been well cared for.
Lack of history may, repeat may, indicate the opposite. Even with a recent service and PPI, lack of records will make it hard to determine how the car has been treated.

But I agree Dave, without service records I'd have still bought my Spider, but as you say, with a lot more scrutiny. However, had it been a 355, I'd have passed. But that's just a reflection of my own risk tolerance.

No disagreement as I too like the records for several reasons:

- As we both mentioned, it's an indication if the car was treated right and if the owners spared no expense to address issues.

- Great for diagnostics and knowing if any known issues have been corrected

- I like the history for the history.

Some would say (I don't fully agree) that the current condition is far more important that yesterday's records. I suppose that is true but having the records just tells the story and likely hood of today's condition.
 

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I don't think I have ever bought a used car (of the sports variety) that had adequate records by my standards. To me that just means that one or more previous owners were ignorant, stupid, or not a real car guy, not that the car is not in good shape. I think that when it is time for me to try a different flavor, a future buyer will be assured that the car was in perfect mechanical condition with any issues properly addressed because I document EVERYTHING. But I think a buyer would need 4-5 years of receipts to be convinced that the car was in the condition I say it is.
 

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what do you do with a car that has never been in for service?
So there are not "records" until its first 30K service.
aside from the timing belts is mostly a tune up. nothing really crazy there.

I still just don't understand the whole records madness. not this car but lets say it has a fresh service you have that piece of paper. The history is nice if its there but I think most Used Ferrari buyers seem to think the New Ferrari buyers give a crap about this stuff.

If they did not nearly as many Ferrari's would be missing their tools and jacks and paperwork.

Hell If I'm the first buyer of a car you even get the Original window sticker but I have only ever purchased 3 new vehicles everything else has been used.


Not everyone thinks about that crap.
 

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Only a brave man would buy a a f-car without records. The only exception would be f-cars from the 1950s & 1960s. I'd buy one with no records and not running and a wheel or 2 missing.
 

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I bought my 360 spider with a history however the previous owner hadn't carried out an annual service each year however the car had only done 1000 miles a year with previous M.O.T. certificates to back this up. When i bought the car I had a PPI carried out revealing no faults on the car. Before driving the car away though, even with the car only covering 14,200 miles I had the major 18,750 service and belts carried out as a precaution. I will be carrying out servicing as per log book through out my ownership of the car.
 

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only a brave man would buy a ferrari without a PPI from the best mechanic available. Paper, i'm not as impressed with.
And the first thing I ask for, prior to doing a PPI is the service records to review. Often times they tell a story, other times a tall tale or two. Considering the ultra-high cost to repair/sort out a 355, coupled with the overall neediness of this model, in many ways it's better to have service records that starting out with nothing and guessing the quality of care it's seen in the past.

And then there's the whole subject on just how long a real PPI should take....and cost.
 

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And then there's the whole subject on just how long a real PPI should take....and cost.
Having done 2 PPI's myself, one being more of a visual inspection and checking if stuff works and the other including a CC test, anyone that thinks a PPI should take 1-2 hours or cost a couple hundred dollars is on crack.

A proper PPI (with CC and possibly LD) will take a full 8 hour day and should cost those hours times the going rate for shop doing the PPI. Anything less is a surface check.
 
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