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Just checked several 1995 456 GTs and none had steering wheel or passenger-side das airbags.
Regards,
Gianni
Gianni, I assumed a US version. Not sure which countries didn't have them in 95 (besides the UK), but US cars have had them since Sept 1989. Here's a photo of a 95 for sale in Texas. The Ferrari parts manual lists both with and without but does not contain corresponding info on serial or VIN numbers.
 

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Gianni, I assumed a US version. Not sure which countries didn't have them in 95 (besides the UK), but US cars have had them since Sept 1989. Here's a photo of a 95 for sale in Texas. The Ferrari parts manual lists both with and without but does not contain corresponding info on serial or VIN numbers.
This 456 GT was originally imported into Japan by Cornes and I looked at it 2 days ago and it definitely did not have airbags in the steering wheel or dashboard as shown in your photo (see photo here). I do not have the VIN but the Assembly No. is 18681. I'll go back tomorrow to pick-up the seller's documentation on the car which is excellent. I'll also take a photo of the VIN plate showing the manufacturing date. Goes to show that not all Ferrari of the same model are built equally.

Regards,
Gianni
 

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Hello All,

I have seen this carbon fiber look gear shift knob with the Ferrari logo from time-to-time. Is this a Ferrari aftermarket product, a 3rd party product, or a Ferrari option? When did it first appear?

I ask these questions since this knob is in a car I am considering to buy (see photo below).

Thank you,
Gianni
 

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When the Scaglietti options for the 550 appeared over the winter of 97/98, CF trim was an option and it included a CF shift knob. The same basic design carried over to the 575, 612, and 599. Very expensive from the factory as a separate item..
 

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When the Scaglietti options for the 550 appeared over the winter of 97/98, CF trim was an option and it included a CF shift knob. The same basic design carried over to the 575, 612, and 599. Very expensive from the factory as a separate item..
Whoohoo! Thank you for the good news, Terry!

After searching for my first Ferrari for 2 years, I bought a 456M GT last week, and I'm in the process of making an offer on a 550 Maranello. Wish me luck!

Once the dust settles from my purchases, I'll post an update.

Regards,
Gianni
 

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For the record: 1999 Ferrari 456M GT

1999 Ferrari 456M GT
VIN: ZFFWL44A8X0113122
Assembly No.: 30266
Manufactured on: June 1998
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

(see story and photos in 550/575 thread)
 

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1999 Ferrari 456M GT
VIN: ZFFWL44A8X0113122
Assembly No.: 30266
Manufactured on: June 1998
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

(see story and photos in 550/575 thread)
Hi Gianni,
compliments for your purchase !!
Very nice 456 ... :)
 

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1999 Ferrari 456M GT - Update

1999 Ferrari 456M GT
VIN: ZFFWL44A8X0113122
Assembly No.: 30266
Manual Gated 6-speed
Exterior: Blu Midnight PPG 136644
Interior: Tan (Cuoio)
Upper Dash: Blu Midnight

Hello All,

I posted about my newly purchased 1999 Ferrari 456M GT on the 550/575M owners thread last October (post #525 on page 27) and a very short posting above with only one photo. I should have made the original posting here, my error.

Although the car's story is in the original posting, I've added some more details of the purchase and update of the repairs to share with others that may be in the situation as I was 4 years ago when I started looking to purchase for my first Ferrari.

After looking at many different Ferrari models, I "finally" realized that I wanted a V12 with a manual transmission. Since my other 3 cars were all 2+2 GTs (Bentley/Lotus/Buick), I focused on the 412 GT, 456/456M GTs. Since only 50 612 manual transmission models were built, and almost impossible to find, it was not in my search, although I could not help myself to view them when the opportunity arose. The older 2+2 models have increased so much in value that they were no longer in my budget.

Last July (2016), I found a very nice 1999 456M GT with 32,000 km in a special order paint (Blu Midnight) and cuoio interior in Montreal that was originally ordered and purchased by the owner of the local Ferrari dealership with a well documented history. Unfortunately, this car was not driven between 2006 and 2014 and likewise was not maintained. It had been for sale for almost 2 years by the 2nd owner (a friend of the 1st owner) who owns several car dealerships in the Ottawa area. He also did not maintain the car at all (no service invoices), but only drove it about 1,500 km. He was asking a very ridiculous price (about 50% over the going price) so I didn't bother fly to Ottawa to look at it. Then the 2nd owner sold it to another friend who owns a very large classic car dealership in Montreal that I have visited several times and got to know him (Italian heritage like mine). So I flew to Montreal (5.5 hours one-way) the day after it was posted online and spent 2 days looking and test driving it. It was now priced "to sell", but since it had been neglected for 10 years, I was able to negotiate a very reasonable price, knowing it would cost a significant amount to get it back to "showroom condition".

There was a long list of repairs that had to be made ($30k CDN; $22k USD), all of which were common for a car that sat idle for 10 years (i.e., no big surprises, just a lot of work that needed to be done).

But most curiously, the front and back bumpers had several very fine vertical cracks, that were only apparent when the light hit them at a certain angle (see the last photo below). There were no signs of impact and no record of any reported accident. I suspect these were fatigue cracks from a very rough running engine developed over several years.

The bumpers appear to be made from a fiber-reinforced plastic (from my visual inspection). It took many e-mails and phone calls between the Ferrari Toronto dealership, Ferrari USA, and Ferrari Maranello before a repair plan could be developed. And since the car had a special order paint (Midnight Blu 136634) that was now 15 years old, the PPG USA/Canada staffs were also contacted for their advice after the first painting was not satisfactory. In the end, the car is now in showroom condition...woohoo! :thumbsup:

Has anyone seen this type of bumper cracking in their 456/456M or any other Ferrari model with similar bumper material? :hmmm:

Thanks again to everyone here who assisted with my "purchasing a Ferrari education".

Regards,
Gianni
 

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Gianni- There were probably more like 200-300 manual 612s out of the 3025 built.
 

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612 and manual vs paddle

Gianni- There were probably more like 200-300 manual 612s out of the 3025 built.
Hello Terry,

Thank you for informing me of the much larger number of 612 manual gearbox cars. Not sure where I got 50, maybe that's the number for 599 manual gearbox cars?

In my Ferrari search, I test drove three 612s and concluded that because it was much larger than I expected (particularly the longer hood), that it drove and felt more like my Bentley GT than a sports car and likewise I much preferred the paddle shift gearbox for it. However, I do prefer the manual gearbox in my 456M GT because it feels more like a 2-seater sports car.

So far, I have only driven my 456M GT in the city and I'm looking forward to taking it to Jasper this summer and cruising in the Rocky Mountains. I suspect the 612 would offer a more luxurious and powerful ride, although the 456M GT may provide better handling in the tight winding mountain roads, particularly with the manual gearbox. I'm excited to find out.

Since you have a 3-peddle 575M, I'd like to hear about your driving experience, particularly on mountain roads, and any words of caution you can offer.

Have you seen this type of bumper cracking before? Particularly since it was in both bumpers.

Best regards,
Gianni
 

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Gianni,

Sorry for the late response, I am only now seeing your post regarding bumper cracks.

In the last 18 months, I have inspected/driven 6 different 456Ms. Four of them had the small vertical cracks as you describe. I've enclosed a photo of the latest car below. In the photo, there are two cracks in the horizontal section just above the corners of the license plate.

At first, I was very alarmed/concerned by them and assumed they were the result of a low speed impact. Yet on only the first of the cars was there any other visible damage or signs of repair. In that case, the owner admitted that she had backed into the garage wall.

I have come to believe that it is a fairly common occurrence with these composite structures. However, my guess is that the material is prone to stress cracks from a combination of heat cycles, repeated expansion and contraction, and perhaps leaning on them while accessing the boot (or engine, but I have not seen them in front bumpers)

My understanding is that the official Ferrari fix is quite involved. How did you remedy yours?

BTW - the car in the picture should arrive tomorrow. I'll post more details then.
 

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456M GT Bumper Cracks

Gianni,

Sorry for the late response, I am only now seeing your post regarding bumper cracks.

In the last 18 months, I have inspected/driven 6 different 456Ms. Four of them had the small vertical cracks as you describe. I've enclosed a photo of the latest car below. In the photo, there are two cracks in the horizontal section just above the corners of the license plate.

At first, I was very alarmed/concerned by them and assumed they were the result of a low speed impact. Yet on only the first of the cars was there any other visible damage or signs of repair. In that case, the owner admitted that she had backed into the garage wall.

I have come to believe that it is a fairly common occurrence with these composite structures. However, my guess is that the material is prone to stress cracks from a combination of heat cycles, repeated expansion and contraction, and perhaps leaning on them while accessing the boot (or engine, but I have not seen them in front bumpers)

My understanding is that the official Ferrari fix is quite involved. How did you remedy yours?

BTW - the car in the picture should arrive tomorrow. I'll post more details then.
Here's a photo of my rear bumper cracks, very similar to yours. I had the front bumper cracks repaired at a Ferrari dealership, where they ground the crack to sound base material, filled them in with unknown material (top secret), prepared the repaired surface, then painted the entire bumper. But they totally missed the rear bumper cracks!

From the cracks' initiation site (stress concentration at bumper corner), morphology (straight), orientation to bumper brackets, and application of vibrational (cyclic) stress from the engine through the bracket (Part 5 in the diagram) with the crack propagation perpendicular to the principle stress (engine vibration), are all indicative of mechanical fatigue cracks (not thermal fatigue - hot/cold cyclic stress).

Likewise these fatigue cracks are most likely due to a design fault that would be expected to be a common problem with this model. So I'm not surprised you've seen it in multiple cars.

The rear bumper bracket design for the 456M is different than the 456 due to its movable spoiler that was deleted in the 456M.

Unfortunately, there were no photos taken of my front bumper cracks, and since the dealership was 2,200 miles (3,500 km) away from me, I didn't get the chance to see them.

I am now more curious than ever if others here have seen these types of bumper cracks in their 456 or 456M.

Regards,
Gianni
 

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Gianni,

Comparing the crack locations to the parts diagram, most of the ones I've seen seem to align with the outside of the bracket.

I think your explanation of the cause makes sense. If that is correct, do you suppose a thin rubber pad, mounted between the bumper and bracket, would solve the issue?
 

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Gianni,

Comparing the crack locations to the parts diagram, most of the ones I've seen seem to align with the outside of the bracket.

I think your explanation of the cause makes sense. If that is correct, do you suppose a thin rubber pad, mounted between the bumper and bracket, would solve the issue?
It is logical that the cracks would align with "outside of the bracket" since its the focal point of the applied stress (i.e., bending point due to vibration).

You have a good idea in that anything that would dampen (lower) the vibrational cyclic stress transmitted through the bracket to the bumper would assist to minimize the fatigue cracking that is occurring. Adding a "high-density polymer" pad to absorb some of the vibration would certainly help. On the other hand, a "thin rubber" pad that would be compressed into near-zero thickness would probably not provide much dampening.

Regards,
Gianni
 

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456M question

Can you run 19" wheels on a 456? 17s I know are original equipment, 18s I know will work but any info on 19?"

Thanks.
 

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Finally found my 456M GT Cupholder!

Finally found my 456M GT Cupholder!

Gianni
 

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Colonel - how do you compare the shifting of the 612 to your 599? I drove a 2005 612 last weekend and was surprised at the slow/abrupt speed of the shifting.
 
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