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Discussion Starter #1
Has anybody out there removed the engine/trans from a 328 ? Got any advice, hot tips, or things not to do. Straps vs. chains? Best lift points? Is it easier if I pull the bellhousing for extra clearance? No sense learning all this the hard way. Thanks. -Steve
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I'm planning on pulling the engine/trans this weekend, so, yes, any tips could be useful! Thanks. -Steve
 

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I don't have any tips but would love to hear about what you learn this weekend. I'm going to pull my engine out next year for a major.
 

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whiteNSX said:
I'm planning on pulling the engine/trans this weekend, so, yes, any tips could be useful! Thanks. -Steve


Most of it is pretty obvious but I and most of the other people in the dealer network when we did those a lot in the 80's used nylon straps and put them around the front bank intake cam and distributor. That lifts the motor at the perfect angle to come out that hole. The factory put them in with the bell housing, A/C compressor and the entire fuel injection system attached. It is however easier to take those off before removing. For the exhaust system, the rear bank manifold comes off easy but for the front take the pipe connection by the front pulley off and lift the motor the way I described until the valve cover is a little lower than the bottom of the rear window and reach down behind the motor and unbolt the manifold from the head. Just watch the analyzer tubes and slide it off the studs and drop it in the chassis.

I could go on and on step by step but would take me an hour. Those are the only things that come to mind that are not pretty obvious.


Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Engine Removal

Thanks very much, Brian. That's just what I needed to know. I've got just about everything stripped off, so it shouldn't be too bad. -Steve
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Engine's Out

Piece of cake, Brian, thanks for the tip. The only things I had to remove that I hadn't already were the front bank motor mounts. That's a big chunk of aluminum hanging seven feet in the air, so I took one quick picture with my brave assistants, and we got it backed out and on the ground.
 

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Awesome Steve! This advice will help me when I go to yank my engine out. Thanks for posting the pic also. I'll be sure and remember to get some of those moving blankets. Also your picture will remind me to put my antenna down before I start. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Engine Removal

Thanks, Pete,

Those are actually old horse blankets. You think a Ferrari is a money pit? Try a horse. You feed them lots of dollar bills and all you get is manure. But my wife really likes her horse, so what can I say :) Meanwhile, I hope it's nice and cool in Maine in two weeks when I'm there. It is supposed to be 113 degrees here in Phoenix today. Also, I'm a bit embarrassed about the picture I posted. If you look on the wall, you'll see two large pipe wrenches. No, I never use them on cars. -Steve
 

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Actually, I've found the Ferrari to be a fairly reasonable toy to own. Since I can do all my own work it is just the price of the parts and you can shop around for those.

I've been involved in the horse business and can sympathise. When the horse is giving you problems, like loss of power, overheating, etc., you can't just stick it in the stable and say you'll look at it next week. You can't do your own work on it and it still requires fuel even if you are not using it. Plus the only time I've had to clean up after the Ferrari was after I worked on it. I've never had to spend several hours cleaning up after it because I left it in the garage alone for a week. The Ferrari doesn't try to escape and it doesn't chew on the walls when it gets bored. Plus I enjoy the smell of the interior of the Ferrari, I don't really care much for the smell of a horse. :)

The weather is pretty cool up here. You are looking at 113°? It is 58° up here right now. It was up in the 70's last week and I had the A/C on in the truck.
 

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The pipe wrenches made sense to me. Then again I might be the only one that goes for it to bang on some metal because that bolt just won't get lose!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Pipe Wrenches

Thanks, Enzo. My students would be proud of you.....

Steve Julius
Instructor
Automotive Technology Department
Mesa Community College
Mesa, Arizona
 

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good thread . hey whats wrong with pipe wrenches and manure .just keep em separated . too funny . i would remove the lid shocks till i installed the lid again. road test the car without the lid .good time to look at all hoses . coolant ,fuel , vent and a/c . the a/c seems to get tweeked moving the compressor around . forza frank
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Engine Work

Yup, I plan on replacing every gasket, seal, hose, and fluid. I'll clean up the engine bay, polish the shields, powdercoat brackets, and generally detail everything. The engine had a major service 4,000 miles ago (before I bought the car), but I'll replace the timing belts anyway, and check valve clearance. And I teach an A/C course, so I can go through that system, too. I plan on being done by the time the weather cools down in September. So far, I have a lot of parts cleaned up, including all the aluminum on the engine and trans. What fun. -Steve
 

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Looks beautiful Steve. Does your school teach body work and paint also?
 

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Discussion Starter #17
School

No, our school does not do body work or paint. We do engine performance, A/C, powertrains, electrical, suspension steering and alignment, brakes, and engine theory. One of my former students, however, learned paint on his own, and opened up a shop nearby. He painted my Pantera, which came out terrific. -Steve
 

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Well your former student definately aquired the skill. That Pantera is certainly something to drool over.
 

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whiteNSX said:
No, our school does not do body work or paint. We do engine performance, A/C, powertrains, electrical, suspension steering and alignment, brakes, and engine theory. One of my former students, however, learned paint on his own, and opened up a shop nearby. He painted my Pantera, which came out terrific. -Steve

Sorry to change the subject but which school do you work for? I have hired several from a nationally advertised school whose name I will leave out, that sent me a series of supposedly star students that were all a very serious disappointment. I have spoken to several other shop owners and managers that have hired from the same school and have had the same experience. I am sure the schools are not all the same in that sense but I have been left with the opinion that the school in question is really doing their students a disservice. Also the students I speak of did not all come from the same campus.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Skool

I teach at Mesa Community College in Mesa, Arizona, which is definitely not nationally advertised. Our goal is to teach entry level mechanics, so that guys (and gals) can get a job at an independent shop or dealership. Most of the graduates don't start at a Ferrari or Jaguar facility. One of our claims to fame is that our students usually win the state skills competition for post-secondary schools. Several have gone on to run their own shops. Of course, not all our students are so exemplary. I hope none of our students have disappointed you. -Steve
 
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