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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi everyone,

I did a quick fog light installation on my 308 last week. I thought it would be neat to post some pictures, so here they are, along with a quick explanation of what and how. . .

I can have more detailed pictures later if anyone is interested, but for now here is the finished product:



The lights are Cibie Series 35 with yellow fog lenses. They were the obvious choice, given that other variations of Cibie 35s are factory equipment on other 308s, 400s, and Mondials.

I don't like drilling holes in cars and don't like doing any modification that can't be put back to original without a trace, so with that in mind, here's what I did:

1) I made brackets to mount the lights on. They are about 3-4 inches long and are L-shaped. I made them from 1/8" thick steel. They bolt to the bumper on the same bolt that holds the bumper to the energy absorbing bumper mount. I panted them, and then sanded away the paint around the holes to allow for electrical ground. Once aimed, I gave each mounting nut a quick shot of marine corrosion inhibitor.

2) I mounted a waterproof Bosch relay and a large 20-amp fuse near the ground stud in the area behind/inside of the left headlight. I used nylon "zip" ties to mount the relay and fuseholder -- again, no drilling.

3) I have 10-gauge marine grade wire (tinned copper, fine strands, more weather-resistant insulation) running from the positive battery lead clamp, through the fuse and into the relay, and two lines of 10 gauge from the relay, one going to each lamp (the relay has two output spades). My multimeter doesn't measure any drop in voltage at all from battery to bulbs. Again, the lights are grounded through the body. The wires are wrapped in electrical tape and secured with nylon ties along the same path as the wiring harness already there.

4) For the "switch" circuit of the relay, one wire goes to the grounding stud right there on the frame. Working backwards, I removed the fiberglass tub and ran the wire "behind the scenes" in the front compartment and into the cabin via the gromnet near the center, where several wires and cables enter. It is secured along the way so as to not interfere with the operation of the heater cables, etc.

5) The on-off switch that came with the lighting kit fits into a small housing. Luckily, there is already a screw on the underside of the dashboard to the left of the steering column for attaching the housing -- again, no need to drill. The housing is mounted with double-side tape, and secured with one screw and a rubber washer. It's not going anywhere, not visually intrusive, and the worst possible consequence might be tape residue on vynil. Pity.

6) The wire from the front goes to one terminal on the switch. A wire from the other terminal is routed (and secured) behind/inside the dashboard up and over the steering column, above the radio, and into the mess of wiring spaghetti that surrounds the fuse and relay panels on the passenger side.

7) Now I get to choose my terminal at the fuse box: one for when the low-beams only are one, or one when the key is on, or if I swap the lenses for un-fluted ones I can connect it for high-beam only operation. Attach it on the spade *below* the fuse, as that is "downstream" of the fuse. The relay only uses about 750mA, but you still want the circuit protected!




The lights do not look as sleek as in the European model 308s where they are recessed into the grille, but they function great, and project completely without obstruction. They look at home under the [larger] U.S. model bumper, and from standing up next to the car, they don't spoil the lines at all.

On the road at night, the Cibies are a blast. I always thought that people's claims of better definition with selective yellow was more psychological than real, so I wasn't expecting anything from them compared to white lenses; hoo-ahh was I surprised! In the first few minutes with yellow the lights on, before getting used to it, things jump out so much that it feels like getting a new prescription for my eyeglasses. You get used to it quickly, though, and from then on just generally/subconsciously feel more confident or less strain. But I was really surprised!

I'm one of those stupid Americans who doesn't know that fog lights are for rain/snow/fog. It gets foggy almost nightly in spring and fall where I live, but the truth is, these lights make great supplementary low beams. They are perfectly legal in the U.S., they don't glare into oncoming traffic, we have no restrictions for their usage, and they aid visibility in many conditions. Most of all, in many parts of the eastern and central U.S., deer are the single greatest hazard on the road at night, and with a good pair of fog lights (with their wide beam) you can see deer approaching from the side of the road, rather than only at the instant they jump in front of you.


Cheers,

Tony :)
 

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What a great job and ingenuity, Tony. I like the balance between the lights and the car. It would be nice to see a straight on shot from front to see how the lights blend in w/ the rest. Thanx so much for sharing your project w/ us. You're lucky that I do not live near you, otherwise ...you'll be bugged constantly by a nagging neighbor asking for favors. w/ smiles Jimmy
 
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