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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 1985 308.
This weekend my speedometer started acting up.
Sometimes after coming to a complete stop, the speedometer will not move, until a tap it, and then it goes all the way to 180 and back to my current speed.
This happens almost every time I stop moving.
Sometimes it works fine, sometimes I need to tap it, and sometimes it does not work after taping it.
I assume it is a bad connection on the speedometer itself. Is it something I can fix myself?
Has any of you have had this problem?
 

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Boxer, there are no laws about "tampering" with a speeometer and definately none preventing you from attempting to repair it. The laws you are thinking about concern "Odometer fraud" which is mechanically rolling back the odometer with the intention of making the car appear to have lower mileage and the owner makes a false statement concerning the actual mileage.

Canut, having said all that above, the speedometer itself is an electric unit and there really isn't anything you can do to repair it yourself. Boxer is right, 308 speedo's are fickle but the problem is usually the impulse generator on the transaxle, not the speedo itself. Where you can get yours to work again by slapping it indicates it probably is the speedometer itself. You could try and check just to see if the wires are loose on the back, but you have to take the unit out to do that. While it's out you might as well send it off to have it looked at.
I've heard good things about Palo Alto Speedometer here's their website: http://www.paspeedo.com/index.htm
 

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Pete, Thanks for clarifying my rather tangled response. What my concern would be for Canut is that if he starts to try and legitimately fix the bad speedometer, he will leave signs on it that it has been worked on. Without any documentation to support the work done, if he tried to sell the car, a prospective owner could accuse him of disconnecting the speedo (which has happened on quite a few 308's and it is always a point to check for a prospective owner). Hence the recommendation to take it in to a dealer/garage so that their is a proper paper trail.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you guys.
I can probably take the speedometer out by myself, but my expertise is limited to check if a cable is loose at the back of the unit.
If it is something more then a loose wire, I'll have the shop look at it, o send it to get fixed.

You are a bunch of helpful guys.
 

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Boxer said:
Pete, Thanks for clarifying my rather tangled response. What my concern would be for Canut is that if he starts to try and legitimately fix the bad speedometer, he will leave signs on it that it has been worked on. Without any documentation to support the work done, if he tried to sell the car, a prospective owner could accuse him of disconnecting the speedo (which has happened on quite a few 308's and it is always a point to check for a prospective owner). Hence the recommendation to take it in to a dealer/garage so that their is a proper paper trail.
Boxer, as you well know, the mileage on any 308 is to be suspect because of the inherent speedometer problem (and the ease with which it may be disconnected). Legally, you can do anything you want to the speedometer or the odometer as long as you do not intentionally try and mis-represent the car. Example: The speedo fails at 75k miles, I get a new speedo that says 50k miles. I must disclose that fact to a perspective buyer or I am committing odometer fraud. You can have a speedo that failed 3 years ago and it is perfectly legal for you to put down on the bill of sale "Actual mileage unknown". It is not legal for you to put down the mileage the speedo read when it failed 3 years ago.

Since we are talking about a model that most of which are antique (mine's 26 years old) it is more important to judge condition than mileage (of course I know you are well aware of that). If I were to sell my car, I would point out to a prospective buyer any flaw in the car that I am aware of and present the car in the condition I believe it to be in. If he were to tell me that he suspected I was mis-representing the mileage because he sees evidence that instruments had been removed on a 26 year old car, I would promptly inform him that perhaps this may not be the car for him after all and invite him to leave the premises.

Bottom line - the mileage doesn't really matter on a 308. I would rather have a 20 year old car that was driven 3k miles a year than a 20 year old car that was driven 60k miles in the first year and then stored in a barn. Now if we were talking about an Enzo or a 360, then I might be a little more concerned about what the odometer reads. But not a 308. No rust, new belts - Cool!
 
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