Ferrari Life Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,696 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I just had my first service on my 550. It appears some yo-yo did not do the brakes in the front correctly. Shims were incorrect, rotors needed a turning, and the pads were BMW, not Ferrari.

Wonderful. Less than 1,500 miles on it and I just spend $850 on a brake job on the front wheels. Man, this 550 is not cheap.

On the other hand, I am driving it to San Diego tomorrow morging. This is what I got it for.

BONZI.

:green:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,509 Posts
$850! Ouch! On my Jeep I converted the rear drum brakes to a brand new rear disc brake set-up from Stainless Steel Brakes and the whole job only cost me $550. That included new rotors, new calipers, new pads, all the hoses, all the brackets, all the seals, and the new parking brake set up.

I am by no means wealthy, one of the reasons I could justify owning an older Ferrari is the fact that I can do all the work on it myself and it is no big deal if the car sits in the garage while I am working on it or waiting on parts. It is strictly a toy. If the $850 repair bill is getting you down, you may want to invest some of your time in learning how to do some of this work yourself. Brake work is not rocket science. It is actually one of the easier things to repair on the car. I believe that you could have done the whole job yourself in a day (maybe two depending on how busy the machine shop is because you would have to drop the rotors off and have them machine them for you for $30 and how many breaks you take) For $850 you could have bought the factory service manual (which you will always have), all the tools (which you will always have), all the parts and still had enough money left to take the wife out to the fanciest restaurant in town (driving her in the Ferrari of course).

I don't know your situation or the constraints on your time. I am merely suggesting a way in which you might reduce the cost of owning the car by investing money in tools and knowledge before the fact rather than paying a hefty repair bill after the fact. If you are good with instructions, buy the factory service manual and read it cover to cover. Learn how the car was built and what all the pieces do. If you have no clue about what makes a car tick, spend the $300 or so and take an evening adult ed course in auto mechanics. Even if you don't plan on working on the car, that course is worth the money just so you can learn what actually happens when you pick the left foot up and put the right foot down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,082 Posts
Pete04222 said:
Even if you don't plan on working on the car, that course is worth the money just so you can learn what actually happens when you pick the left foot up and put the right foot down.
That is SOOO beautifully said :green:

and Bart, that's a HUGE bill.
you might wanna take up Pete's advice
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,509 Posts
Peter,
Loved the picture. I was looking at it and thinking "Oh my God, someday that will be me!".

I did pick up the tip on the cardboard shielding from the photo though! Thanks! I haven't taken the rear deck lid off the 308 yet but I think I have decided that I am just going to remove it whenever I want to work on the engine. What a pain in the butt that thing is! It even sucks just trying to check the oil. I wish they had put the deck lid on like they did the GTS top, a lightweight fiberglass lid with 2 pins and 2 latches.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,509 Posts
Hey Peter, I just looked at your photo again because I realised the car was sitting on its tires. You didn't take out the engine without removing the rear tires did you? I really want to know.
BTW- The engine looks amesome!

Also, when the camera man says "cheese!" you are supposed to smile! :D :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
575 Posts
Pete:

The covering on the window is actually 1/2" particle-board. Cardboard isn't substantial enough to stop a 500+lb engine from crashing into the rear window...

The engine just bolts on the frame of the car. the rear suspension is separate and attaches solely to the frame. The only thing connecting the wheels to the motor are the half-shafts. This was essential, as once the engine was lifted out by my overhead hoist, I rolled the car out of the way, then lowered the engine onto my work-stand.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,509 Posts
[quote='75 308 GT4 (Peter)]
Pete04222 said:
Also, when the camera man says "cheese!" you are supposed to smile! :D :D
Oh no, this is very serious business, no smiling allowed :lol:[/quote]

:green: :green: :green: :green:
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top