F430 F430 Winter - Ferrari Life
 
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post #1 of 10 Old 01-26-2014, 08:38 PM Thread Starter
 
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F430 Winter

Hi Guys-








New to the forum relatively.
I purchased a F430 , 2006, in November. I live in the Midwest, so I have basically just been keeping it in the garage. Is there anything special I should be doing since I'm not driving it? I turn the car on and I will literally drive it to the end of driveway and then back into the garage atleast once a week. I usually keep it on for about 30 min during this weekly ritual (unfortunately, my condo association will not allow us to plug cars into the sockets in the garage...).


Otherwise, I have the cover placed on at all times.


I did take it for a spin once. Then it started snowing hard. Despite putting the car in 'snow mode', I slipped a tad a few times. I ended up having a tow company tow the car back on a flatbed because I didn't want to risk it. I was never one to look at the weather websites prior to driving, until now!!


Thanks for any pointers you guys can give me about how to care for the car in the winter.
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post #2 of 10 Old 01-26-2014, 08:51 PM
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Hi Guys-
... I usually keep it on for about 30 min during this weekly ritual (unfortunately, my condo association will not allow us to plug cars into the sockets in the garage...).
Why? And how would they know?

Istwve
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post #3 of 10 Old 01-26-2014, 10:59 PM
 
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.......... snip ..........


Thanks for any pointers you guys can give me about how to care for the car in the winter.
Yeah ............. stop doing what you're doing.

If you're not going to drive your car for a long while, most experts are of the opinion that you should either DRIVE your car long enough to warm EVERYTHING up or not start it at all. Letting your car idle for a long period is generally considered bad practice whether or not you're storing your car or driving it regularly. You're just going to produce excess carbon and contaminate your oil with condensation (which produces acids inside the engine) . Even if the water temperature gets warm enough to open the thermostat, the engine oil and transmission oil won't ever get properly warm, especially in cold weather.

I live in northern Italy where we have a significant winter with salted roads, etc. But recently the weather has been sunny and temperatures have been well above freezing following a long period of rain. Consequently the roads are clean and dry at the moment. So, when these conditions occur, I take it as a sign from God that I should drive my 360 Modena.

I simply take the cover off, turn on the battery master switch, follow the ECU reset procedure, and go for a drive of at least 30 minutes, but usually an hour or more. It takes about 15 minutes for the oil to reach a temperature which allows me to exceed 4000 rpm, so you can't even load the engine unless you drive longer than that.

When I see a spate of bad weather coming, I wash the car, follow the storage recommendations in the owners manual (over inflate the tires for example), turn off the battery, cover the car, and start looking for another good spate of weather.

Bottom line: I recommend you read the owners manual and follow the procedure there to put your car to bed. Then leave it alone until you have conditions which allow a half hour drive some of which involves loading the engine enough to get it really warm. Don't forget your radio code if applicable. I never use a charger or tender and I have never had any problem starting my car even after months of inactivity, but I do turn the battery off.
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post #4 of 10 Old 01-27-2014, 12:17 AM
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+1 I recommend to follow Roberto's excellent advice
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post #5 of 10 Old 01-27-2014, 08:56 PM Thread Starter
 
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Originally Posted by Mozella View Post
Yeah ............. stop doing what you're doing.

If you're not going to drive your car for a long while, most experts are of the opinion that you should either DRIVE your car long enough to warm EVERYTHING up or not start it at all. Letting your car idle for a long period is generally considered bad practice whether or not you're storing your car or driving it regularly. You're just going to produce excess carbon and contaminate your oil with condensation (which produces acids inside the engine) . Even if the water temperature gets warm enough to open the thermostat, the engine oil and transmission oil won't ever get properly warm, especially in cold weather.

I live in northern Italy where we have a significant winter with salted roads, etc. But recently the weather has been sunny and temperatures have been well above freezing following a long period of rain. Consequently the roads are clean and dry at the moment. So, when these conditions occur, I take it as a sign from God that I should drive my 360 Modena.

I simply take the cover off, turn on the battery master switch, follow the ECU reset procedure, and go for a drive of at least 30 minutes, but usually an hour or more. It takes about 15 minutes for the oil to reach a temperature which allows me to exceed 4000 rpm, so you can't even load the engine unless you drive longer than that.

When I see a spate of bad weather coming, I wash the car, follow the storage recommendations in the owners manual (over inflate the tires for example), turn off the battery, cover the car, and start looking for another good spate of weather.

Bottom line: I recommend you read the owners manual and follow the procedure there to put your car to bed. Then leave it alone until you have conditions which allow a half hour drive some of which involves loading the engine enough to get it really warm. Don't forget your radio code if applicable. I never use a charger or tender and I have never had any problem starting my car even after months of inactivity, but I do turn the battery off.
Excuse my naiveté


How is what I'm doing different from what you are doing?


In the Midwest here, it's quite cold. Todays forcast with the windshield will be -50degrees.


I have the car in the garage. I don't drive it for 30min, but I do turn the car on for 30min and when I look at the dashboard, certainly the oil looks warm.


Is it that necessary to DRIVE it for 30min? As opposed to turning it on and then driving it about 500 feet (all in all about 45min). Doesn't the engine get warm? It sure as heck feels it when I touch the back of the car.


The issue is here we are getting a worse than ever winter. It's way to icy to drive it, I don't want to slip and hit something.


To the other poster, I'm not sure why they wont let me plug the car in. I just got a notice that said I cant. I'm purchasing a new house in a about a month, at that point, this wont be a concern. In the interim....
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post #6 of 10 Old 01-27-2014, 09:52 PM
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I would never turn off my battery disconnect switch for storage and most Ferrari experts agree with that. Better to use a battery maintainer and leave it connected.

I am also a start up and warm up guy instead of shutting it down for storage. Driving it short distances would be even better, but even rolling it two or three feet helps. The rest of the moving parts are no worse off than they would have been in non-starting storage.

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post #7 of 10 Old 01-29-2014, 06:16 AM
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Originally Posted by tazandjan View Post
I would never turn off my battery disconnect switch for storage and most Ferrari experts agree with that. Better to use a battery maintainer and leave it connected.
This is a good point, and I think it comes down to your personal preference and your track record of success.

I am basically the opposite here. Once I put it away, my 360 Spider stays put and under cover without being turned on at all until I am ready to get it back on the road.

I've seen so many different methods on the internet, but it basically boils down to 2 choices:
1. fill up the gas tank and leave it alone until you're ready to drive it (me)
2. start it up / leave it running and warming up / drive it

Obviously, I'd love to be able to drive it, but that's not practical or reasonable. Also, I've been storing cars for 10+ years with my methods and have had a 100% success rate, so I tend to stick to my tactics based on my experience. I'm not an expert, nor do I claim to be. What I have done works for me.

As for my battery, my Indy Ferrari Mechanic (who also stores customer cars for the winter in his facilities) recommends that I kill the battery switch and place it on a battery tender, which is connected directly to the battery terminals behind the passenger's footwell.

I'll be taking it out of storage-mode in about 2 weeks just before it gets sent in for fluids and belts, so we'll see if this worked. Winter sucks.
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post #8 of 10 Old 01-29-2014, 06:44 AM
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I would also disconnect the main battery switch when a car is stored for a long time (>=2 months). Electricity is the first cause of fire and when a car is left unattended in an underground parking or storage, no one would notice when something is not right. I would definitely vote for Raj nr 1 method.

Now if you have a garage in your house and have the chance to drive her from time to time, then it doesn't make sense to kill the main switch time
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post #9 of 10 Old 01-29-2014, 07:44 PM
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I would figure out a way to keep it on a tender.

The 200.00 for an electrician will pay off in spades over time.

Ferrari's especially F1's are very sensitive / demanding requiring the battery to be optimal.

I live in STL assuming you are north - spring can't come soon enough.
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post #10 of 10 Old 01-29-2014, 08:31 PM Thread Starter
 
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Originally Posted by champagne612 View Post
I would figure out a way to keep it on a tender.

The 200.00 for an electrician will pay off in spades over time.

Ferrari's especially F1's are very sensitive / demanding requiring the battery to be optimal.

I live in STL assuming you are north - spring can't come soon enough.
Next state north of you!.


Can't wait .
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