F430 DIY Sticky part fix - Ferrari Life
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post #1 of 22 Old 02-24-2013, 10:34 PM Thread Starter
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DIY Sticky part fix

Hi guys.

Here is a solution for the common problem known as sticky parts of ferraris.

This is something you can do at home. I'm not recommending brake fluid or any other pro. chemical products.

I used a cheap perfume to loosen the rubber layered on the sticky part.
This part usually doesn't get sticky. But I had a metal keyring and it scratched all the rubber around the ignition place. so It needed to be fixed.

1) We need a cheap perfume and a small piece of soft sponge. (don't use sharp sponge at all! it can scratch or make holograms on the part)



2) Sprat it on the part and wait 3-4 minutes for it too get loose.



Spray 10-20 times in the small sponge. make it all wet with the perfume so sponge will solve and absorb the rubber like black water.




3) You can do 2nd finishing with a cloth like microfiber to absorb it all and you'll have all- clean plastic.



Use some napkins, spray on the part and rub the napkins. the tissue slighly get black and dirty and that's the final remaining layers of rubber.




4) This step is not mandatory, but I sprayed some Hydrating solution. It will not be like wd40 to make it oily funny. It works like you have a brand new plastic and removes the shine and you'll have a fresh plastic part.
*But it is not necessary...
** You also can use leather sprays.




5) Fix it back.




The cover is so easy to open and close, just make sure pulling the steering well out and up first.

I already explained how to clean ashtray and door handles in this forum.

Goodluck , and ask me if you have questions.

F430 F1

Last edited by Pooya; 02-24-2013 at 10:40 PM.
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post #2 of 22 Old 02-24-2013, 10:39 PM
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post #3 of 22 Old 02-25-2013, 09:28 AM
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Nice work!

Does the raw plastic when finished really make it look like a new part? I would think they would need a coat of black paint to make them look like new???
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post #4 of 22 Old 02-25-2013, 08:40 PM
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maybe it is just the lighting, but it doesn't look good to me.



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post #5 of 22 Old 02-26-2013, 06:57 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
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Nice work!

Does the raw plastic when finished really make it look like a new part? I would think they would need a coat of black paint to make them look like new???
No. I could paint it but it is absolutely good without need to do any painting...
and the photo with flash is not as good (see even the leather around the adjustment buttons looks odd)... I will send a proper photo outside of the garage.

the plastic won't be shiny or look cheap...

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post #6 of 22 Old 02-26-2013, 11:51 AM
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Good job Pooya, thanks for sharing I'm just wondering how long the plastic part will last without it's UV protection layer? Maybe you should re-apply an anti-UV varnish to protect it again and get back the shine aspect? Or restore the coating with a product like PlastiDip?
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post #7 of 22 Old 02-27-2013, 09:34 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StefVan View Post
Good job Pooya, thanks for sharing I'm just wondering how long the plastic part will last without it's UV protection layer? Maybe you should re-apply an anti-UV varnish to protect it again and get back the shine aspect? Or restore the coating with a product like PlastiDip?
Good idea.
will send photos and details while spraying a coating layer on it soon.

Here is a better photo.
it's not raw when you touch it... it seems just a unnecessary layer is gone.



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post #8 of 22 Old 02-27-2013, 10:13 AM
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I'm just wondering how long the plastic part will last without it's UV protection layer?
I've buffed plastic parts from my 58 Jaguar using plastic lens polish and they've stayed shiny for years now.

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post #9 of 22 Old 02-27-2013, 01:16 PM
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Great job!
I used oven cleaner and brake fluid for the steering surround on my 430 and it still was difficult to remove. Chanel is a bit too pricey for me!
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post #10 of 22 Old 02-27-2013, 01:36 PM
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The sticky mess has not really started to be a problem on my 360 yet, there some spots where the plastic coating is showing signs of damage ... but the stickiness has not yet manifested itself yet. That said, I expect that I too will likely become a victim of this at some time.

So, to be a bit proactive, I thought I would address this a put together my thoughts on how I might ameliorate sticky switches and other plastic parts. I have seen posts that vary from oven cleaner and steel wool to yak urine. Some people send their parts to a 3rd party vendor who will charge outrageous sums of money ... but have a good reputation for quality work. I have seen comments about if the the plastic substrate should be shiny or dull / satin finish after removing the rubber goo.

So, here goes my two cents worth ...

Now, as many of us will recall from high school chemistry, the universal solvent is water. We know water alone will not dissolve the rubber goo. What about oven cleaner ... basically water based alkaloid cleaner. Can be caustic. But, my take on oven cleaner is that this is waste of time as success using that product seemed to depend on abrasion to get the rubber off. One could just use their finger nail and get that result. There are obviously other solvents one could use, but care must be taken not to undermine the plastic base ... petroleum based products could very well cause damage to the plastic (eg., acetone, MEK, etc.). The OP here used Chanel perfume and found that this worked as a solvent to remove the goo. So, what is it in perfume that would do this ... alcohol.

So, now to my quick test.

Around the ignition key socket, the plastic shroud's rubber coating is pretty badly scarred for previous owners trying to insert key and missing the mark ... thereby scarring the rubber coating. I decided to do a quick trial to see if I could do some good here. I was pretty amazed at how easy it was to clean up a small patch of rubber goo from around this area.

Here is what I did:

Wet a cloth with denatured alcohol (available at any paint store or Home Depot)
Using dampened cloth, I found the rubber goo comes off very easily. In no time at all I was able to remove the rubberized coating from the plastic in the area surrounding the ignition key socket.

Next, I wanted to experiment to see what I could do about cleaning up the plastic substrate. For this, I took a small dab of Simichrome metal polish (the finest metal polish in the world, bar none) and with a cloth rubbed the plastic gently. Buffed it off with a clean cloth, and viola ... a lovely shiny black substrate appears.

So to summarize ... I will likely be removing the steering column shroud and using denatured alcohol remove the rubber goo. When I am left with the un-coated plastic, my next decision is do I want a shiny plastic or satin finish plastic? I think I may try to shine it up with Simichrome and see how it looks. If I think a matte finish would be superior, I would probably try a fine grit air blaster. But maybe a clear coat matte paint would do the job as well. Wait to see on that point. But, thought you all might want to just try the denatured alcohol to dissolve the rubber goo and see if you have same results I had.

Steve
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post #11 of 22 Old 02-27-2013, 04:25 PM
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I've stripped and repainted (or left bare) all of the sticky parts on my former 355 and 95% of the parts on my 430. Some parts I've replace with carbon fiber. Besides oven cleaner and brake fluid, I've tried a lot of different chemicals including acetone, MEK, toluene, xylene, lacquer thinner, socal and alcohol. Some did melt the top surface of the plastic. I haven't tried greased lightning.

I've also used methylene chloride on metal parts only and some pieces stripped in seconds and some parts took hours with multiple applications. Denatured alcohol worked great on some parts, and on other parts, hardly any effect.

It seemed like different parts were painted with different paint because the same chemical reacted differently depending on the part being stripped.

Good luck to all!
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post #12 of 22 Old 02-27-2013, 09:00 PM
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Sounds like you have been thru the gamut. I must confess that I have only tried the denatured alcohol, but with remarkable success. And my reason for that was the success story of the OP using Chanel perfume.

In the near future I think I will remove the shroud from the steering column and give that a makeover. Not sticky, but a lot of scar tissue around the ignition switch.

Steve


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Originally Posted by yronZFF View Post
I've stripped and repainted (or left bare) all of the sticky parts on my former 355 and 95% of the parts on my 430. Some parts I've replace with carbon fiber. Besides oven cleaner and brake fluid, I've tried a lot of different chemicals including acetone, MEK, toluene, xylene, lacquer thinner, socal and alcohol. Some did melt the top surface of the plastic. I haven't tried greased lightning.

I've also used methylene chloride on metal parts only and some pieces stripped in seconds and some parts took hours with multiple applications. Denatured alcohol worked great on some parts, and on other parts, hardly any effect.

It seemed like different parts were painted with different paint because the same chemical reacted differently depending on the part being stripped.

Good luck to all!
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post #13 of 22 Old 02-28-2013, 08:02 AM
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Bisel,

Will you consider making a DIY as you begin to pull the parts off and refinish them? I thought about doing one but I am not very handy and would likely break parts.

Also, do you know if the company who refinishes these pieces finishes them with a coating or paint to make them look new? Or, maybe it is the raw plastic that is the end result.

Lastly, Isopropyl Alcohol is so cheap, did you consider filling a bucket up and letting the parts sit in it and soak before attempting to remove the coating???

Thanks Bisel!
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post #14 of 22 Old 02-28-2013, 09:04 PM
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Rob,

Yes, when I get around to trying my experiment, I wiil document things. I might be barking up the wrong tree here, but I will give it try.

Your other question ... I have read that people using StickyNoMore are very impressed with their work. As I understand it, they remove the silly putty and refinish the parts. Here is their web site.

Sticky No More - Exotic Cars Interior Refinishing Services

I do not have any personal knowledge of their work, but have only heard positive comments.

Steve

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Originally Posted by Rob4092xx View Post
Bisel,

Will you consider making a DIY as you begin to pull the parts off and refinish them? I thought about doing one but I am not very handy and would likely break parts.

Also, do you know if the company who refinishes these pieces finishes them with a coating or paint to make them look new? Or, maybe it is the raw plastic that is the end result.

Lastly, Isopropyl Alcohol is so cheap, did you consider filling a bucket up and letting the parts sit in it and soak before attempting to remove the coating???

Thanks Bisel!
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post #15 of 22 Old 02-28-2013, 11:50 PM
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Hi Guys, I have always taken interest in threads on this topic mostly because I haven't seen this problem in my 575M which is now 10yo or in any 360, F430 etc I have considered buying.

What is the cause of the degradation? UV direct,sunlight, heat or use of cleaners or a combination. Is there actually an upside to our reasonably crap weather here in Ireland?

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post #16 of 22 Old 03-17-2013, 04:21 PM
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Sticky Parts DIY

Today I decided to tackle the sticky coating on the plastic shroud that surrounds the steering column. The goo on my car is not real sticky, but as you can see in the photo, the area around ignition switch is pretty scarred up. You see a shiny bit there ... that was my insitu trial using alcohol before I removed the the shroud.

I decided to try using denatured alcohol as the solvent as it is mild and does not attack the plastic substrate. (BTW ... I tried an inconspicuous spot using lacquer thinner ... DO NOT USE lacquer thinner. It tends to attack the plastic)

Using denatured alcohol, moisten the part. I found the alcohol softens but does not dissolve the sticky substance. A terry cloth towel is used to scrub away the sticky. I also found that if I score the surface of the sticky with my finger nail and use a 3M blue scrubber (the type that does not scratch ... do not use the green scrubber), you can gently scrub the sticky off. It took me about an hour to gently scrub away the sticky goo.

Once the goo was removed, I used Simichrome metal polish (any metal polish should do) to rub out the fine scratches. Following that treatment, I used Mothers Back to Black plastic restorer to restore the color.

In all, about 2 to 3 hours of work here to do both the top and bottom of the steering wheel shroud ... not counting the time to remove and install the plastic shroud which took me about 20 minutes.

Unless I find a better solvent (I read that Home Depot has a degreaser called Zep or something like that that someone claimed success with) ... I will be doing other parts over time. Like the ash tray lid, door handles, etc.

Steve
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Last edited by bisel; 03-17-2013 at 04:41 PM.
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post #17 of 22 Old 03-18-2013, 04:15 AM
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That's a very impressive result Steve, thanks for sharing. Good elbow oil is still the most important when doing such jobs but you gave us very good advice on the products you used.

The difference between the used part picture and the restored one is night and day!
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post #18 of 22 Old 03-18-2013, 07:20 AM
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OMG, great results Steve!
Thanks for posting.
I think I will tackle this on my 360 now.

And you are correct about stickynomore.com

I have seen firsthand and heard of positive results of Robbie's work
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post #19 of 22 Old 03-18-2013, 08:21 AM
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I believe it is important that you perform the step using metal polish. In hind sight, any mild abrasive polish compound will likely work OK, e.g., rubbing compound or polishing compound. I chose to use metal polish as it contains very fine abrasive particles in a mild petroleum based compound. This allows the opportunity to gently rub out fine scratches and remove some residual goo that may have been missed in the cleaning step. I tried to skip this step and the results were not as satisfactory. If you have some deeper scratches, you can try to be a bit more aggressive with the polish step (e.g., use rubbing compound instead of polish). I used the metal polish on a terry cloth towel and gently rubbed it using circular motion with my finger tips. I took my time and tried to evenly apply the polish. I am very satisfied with the results ... the plastic is not perfectly smooth ... there are a few minor scratches and a couple of pits where the ignition key gouged the plastic, but it is so much better than the sticky goo.

Regards,

Steve

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OMG, great results Steve!
Thanks for posting.
I think I will tackle this on my 360 now.

And you are correct about stickynomore.com

I have seen firsthand and heard of positive results of Robbie's work
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post #20 of 22 Old 03-19-2013, 06:36 AM
 
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The fixed air vents under the wind screen on my 2005 F430 Spider are sticky.

They are 2 long plastic pieces on the dashboard very close to the bottom of the wind screen.

Please advise how to pry it up without breaking the catches.
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