F430 50.000km / 31.000 miles service tips - Ferrari Life
 2Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 40 Old 10-31-2011, 01:32 PM Thread Starter
Owner
 
StefVan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Switzerland
Ferrari Life Posts: 2,343
50.000km / 31.000 miles service tips

I was wondering how many F430’s got already 50.000 km / 31.000 miles or are close to that?

Mine reached the 31K miles and it was time to consider a “major” service (yeah, I do drive a lot my car ).

As I mentioned briefly in another thread, I’m not using the services of an official dealer anymore since I got out of the warranty and prefer to do most of the services myself. If anyone is tempted to do this service or part of it, I will try to give some hints. You’ll discover that a “major” service is really not a big deal on the F430 since we got now a distribution chain. It’s almost like an annual service (all fluids) + a couple of more tasks to do. If you carefully read these posts, you'll know in advance what to expect which will avoid mistakes. You'll discover also that working on a F430 is a real pleasure and not that difficult (well easier than some front engine modern cars).

Last edited by StefVan; 10-31-2011 at 02:21 PM.
StefVan is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 40 Old 10-31-2011, 01:36 PM Thread Starter
Owner
 
StefVan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Switzerland
Ferrari Life Posts: 2,343
Change axle shaft heat shields

The first task I wanted to do is to change the axle heat shields. In addition to the usual major service jobs, it’s worth to check their condition. Especially the LHS heat shield will suffer a lot more because the LHS cat is much closer to this heat shield than the RHS cat. These heat shields are really cheap and can be found under the following reference : 208327


To remove the heat shield, it is best to remove the rear wheel mud guards (after having removed the rear wheel). As the carbon filter need to be changed too (see in further posts), it will anyway require the removal of these two panels.

Once the access is free, it is quite easy to slide out the heat shields towards the rear of the car. If you don’t want to remove the mud guards, it is still possible to get out the heat shield but it’s a bit more acrobatic and you have to be careful to not let it fall on the under body panel. In this case, just proceed in the same way by sliding them out toward the rear of the car.


Here are 2 pictures comparing the old and new heat shield. The burned part is located right under the cat, until you remove the shield, it’s difficult to see how bad the situation is. In my case, it was really time to change them
Attached Images
   

Last edited by StefVan; 10-31-2011 at 01:41 PM.
StefVan is online now  
post #3 of 40 Old 10-31-2011, 01:38 PM Thread Starter
Owner
 
StefVan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Switzerland
Ferrari Life Posts: 2,343
Here's a picture with the new heat shield installed.
Attached Images
 
StefVan is online now  
 
post #4 of 40 Old 10-31-2011, 01:46 PM Thread Starter
Owner
 
StefVan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Switzerland
Ferrari Life Posts: 2,343
Change spark plugs

Changing the spark plugs on the F430 is an easy job to do. All operations can be easily done from above the engine. You will need 8 x NGK PMR8B plugs (ref 6378).


When I removed the coil pack of cyl #8 and #1 (please have a look here to get familiar with the cylinder locations : F430 engine banks), I discovered that the paint was gone there.

I suppose that this must be weakness in the design and water or humidity can stagnate there.

I fixed it with a simple touch up paint job as it can not be seen (under the coil pack). For those who want a real fix, you can try out the wrinkle paint like VHT.
Attached Images
 
StefVan is online now  
post #5 of 40 Old 10-31-2011, 01:53 PM Thread Starter
Owner
 
StefVan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Switzerland
Ferrari Life Posts: 2,343
Before you can access the spark plugs, the coil packs must be removed. Normally they should be labelled on the wires. If they aren’t labelled, make sure to add a label with cylinder # on it.

Engine LHS : 8 to 5 (5 being at the rear of the engine bay close to the gearbox).

Engine RHS : 1 to 4 (1 is at the rear of the engine bay close to the gearbox).

When you remove the upper screw on bank 2, be carefull as a small plastic part holding the coil pack will come apart (on bank 1, it's the lower screw holding this small plastic part).

The spark plugs are very deep inside the engine and it’s impossible to see them except if you’re using a small miror. A long 16mm socket is required + an extension. Make sure your 16mm spark plug socket contains a plastic part to be able to catch the spark plug and take it out.

Never force on the wrench. A spark plug should unscrew very easily with a minimum force. Spark plugs are tighten at only 10 Nm which is very low force. I numbered each removed spark plug so that I can compare them if something would be wrong. If the engine is running fine, all 8 spark plugs should have an identical wear.

Picture 1 : location of the spark plug
Picture 2 : 16mm socket + extension + 1/2 –> 1/4 reduction for my torque wrench (wrench used for small levels of torque)
Attached Images
   
StefVan is online now  
post #6 of 40 Old 10-31-2011, 02:03 PM Thread Starter
Owner
 
StefVan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Switzerland
Ferrari Life Posts: 2,343
To fit the new spark plug, slide it inside the socket and carefully slide the socket into the engine cover.

Then use your fingers to screw the spark plug. Donít use a wrench or any other tools because you wonít feel if something is going wrong. Just feel with your fingers how the plug is engaging and screw it gently up to the point you canít screw it anymore.

The most important thing about spark plugs is about putting exactly the right torque when tightening. Excessive tightening can lead to thread damage and insufficient tightening will lead to engine and spark plug overheating.


Finish the job with a torque wrench set at 10Nm. Depending on the force in your fingers, reaching 10Nm will be a couple of wrench clicks. If you donít have a torque wrench, finger tight first the spark plug and then add about 1/2 to 3/4 turn with a wrench.


Coil packs must also be tightened at 10Nm. Make sure to use a torque wrench to do this. When the coil packs were removed, remember that a plastic came apart from the upper screw on bank 2 or lower screw on bank 1. This part must be put back because it holds the upper part of the coil pack. Make sure the coil pack is perfectly clean especially the metallic rings where the bolts go through.


Picture 1 : tighten the spark plug with fingers
Picture 2 : final tighten the spark plug with a torque wrench
Picture 3 : final tighten the coil pack bolts with a torque wrench
Attached Images
     
StefVan is online now  
post #7 of 40 Old 10-31-2011, 02:12 PM Thread Starter
Owner
 
StefVan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Switzerland
Ferrari Life Posts: 2,343
I used the regular NGK PMR8B plugs as recommended by Ferrari and Maserati (these spark plugs has been made on request by Ferrari). They are double platinum. The plug gap is preset at 0.7mm. 8 of PMR8B means the heat range between 2 and 11. So it is rather a ďcoldĒ spark plug as 8 represents the resistance to heating up.


The first picture are the 4 plugs of bank 2 and a new plug. They all have a light grey insulator legs without deposits which means the engine is running with the right operation temperatures. A white insulator would mean a hot running engine (temperature higher then 800C), probably running lean or blocked injectors. A fooled insulator would mean a cold running engine (temperature lower than 450C), probably running rich, excessive idling or lack of air intake flow (dirty air filters). A broken insulator is getting more serious as it may cause damage to the piston or a foreign object is present in the combustion chamber.

My plugs donít have the usual Corona ring (brown ring on the white insulator base) which is normal as there shouldnít be any electrical stress in the air around the plug because the plugs are entirely isolated inside the coil pack. A brown ring would mean that the coil pack isnít tightened enough or the coil gasket is letting air getting inside.


The second picture are the 4 plugs of bank 1.


A last very important thing : donít start the engine after changing the spark plugs. Switch off the main power switch and leave it off during the night (as a precaution, always leave a door open before switching off the main power and don't close the front luggage compartment...).

The day after, do the entire self-learning procedure : cycle the main power switch, wait 15/20 sec, switch off A/C, fan, lights, radio etc, cycle the ignition in position II, wait 15/20 sec, start the engine and let it idle for min. 15 minutes. You're done

Next job will be how to replace the active carbon filter.
Attached Images
   
StefVan is online now  
post #8 of 40 Old 10-31-2011, 03:45 PM
Owner
Elite Member
 
tazandjan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Albuquerque, NM
Ferrari Life Posts: 11,859
Stef- Great stuff.

Taz
Terry Phillips

Present: 575M 135171
Past: Dino 246 GT 02984, 365 GTB/4 14009, 308 GTS 25125

Every day I look around, and if nobody is shooting at me, it is a pretty good day.
tazandjan is online now  
post #9 of 40 Old 11-04-2011, 10:20 AM
Owner
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Switzerland
Ferrari Life Posts: 5
Stef

Great to find your very knowledgeable posts here, you were the reason for me to join fLife...;-)

Hope to meet you in person one day to do some Ferrari talk!

Gruess
Andy

Last edited by griffith; 11-04-2011 at 10:25 AM.
griffith is offline  
post #10 of 40 Old 11-04-2011, 11:49 AM
Owner
Elite Member
 
tazandjan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Albuquerque, NM
Ferrari Life Posts: 11,859
Griffith- Welcome to Ferrari Life. We seem to be gathering steam in Switzerland. You might introduce yourself below in the member introduction section.

Taz
Terry Phillips

Present: 575M 135171
Past: Dino 246 GT 02984, 365 GTB/4 14009, 308 GTS 25125

Every day I look around, and if nobody is shooting at me, it is a pretty good day.
tazandjan is online now  
post #11 of 40 Old 11-04-2011, 05:14 PM Thread Starter
Owner
 
StefVan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Switzerland
Ferrari Life Posts: 2,343
Quote:
Originally Posted by tazandjan View Post
Griffith- Welcome to Ferrari Life. We seem to be gathering steam in Switzerland. You might introduce yourself below in the member introduction section.
Thanks very much Andy- Yes please introduce yourself, I'd like to know more about you and your F430 Sure, I hope too to meet you in person
Schone grusse,
Stef
StefVan is online now  
post #12 of 40 Old 11-04-2011, 06:57 PM
Owner
 
430Addict's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Ferrari Life Posts: 1,075
Amazing stuff once again Stef. Wish I have you as a neighbor.
430Addict is offline  
post #13 of 40 Old 11-05-2011, 03:20 AM Thread Starter
Owner
 
StefVan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Switzerland
Ferrari Life Posts: 2,343
Replacing the Active Carbon Filter

An activated carbon filter is provided for venting a fuel tank. The carbon filter will hold the fuel gases there until they will be released when the ECU decides so by activating a small air pump. These fuel gases will then be rerouted from the carbon filter to the air intake manifold. After some years, the carbon filter is losing efficiency and it's capacity of retaining the fuel gases. That's why it has to be changed.

Here is a picture how this filter looks like. Fuel vapour gases are routed to the filter and the active carbon holds them inside the filter. A small air pump will blow air into the filter to let the vapour gases out through the small pipes. When the solenoid valves are opened, air charged with fuel gases are then be reinjected into the air intake manifold. You can check easily the filter by blowing air into the large air pipe of the filter. You should feel air coming out of both small pipes and it will smell fuel (don't test it with a lighter ).
Attached Images
 
StefVan is online now  
post #14 of 40 Old 11-05-2011, 03:25 AM Thread Starter
Owner
 
StefVan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Switzerland
Ferrari Life Posts: 2,343
This filter is located at the LHS of the engine bay.

As I mentioned before, both mudguards of the LHS rear wheel must be removed to gain access to the carbon filter.
First, unplug the 4 pipes and try to get them away of the filter.
Attached Images
 
StefVan is online now  
post #15 of 40 Old 11-05-2011, 03:27 AM Thread Starter
Owner
 
StefVan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Switzerland
Ferrari Life Posts: 2,343
From the available space in the rear wheel area, remove 2 screws which are holding the bracket around the filter. You will have to remove these screws from behind (blindly) but it is not that difficult. I loosened also the 3 bolts (green arrows) holding the entire assembly to make it easier to slide out the carbon filter.

Leave the bracket in the rear part near the vacuum tank.
Attached Images
 
StefVan is online now  
post #16 of 40 Old 11-05-2011, 03:31 AM Thread Starter
Owner
 
StefVan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Switzerland
Ferrari Life Posts: 2,343
On first picture you can see better where the filter bracket is bolted. The location of the air pump and air filter is also indicated here. Usually, this small air filter doesn't need to be replaced.



As shown on the second picture, slide out the filter from above (engine bay). Make sure nothing is in the way. It will take a bit time to get it
out but just take your time to do this. Make sure that the vacuum pipe going from the tank to the exhaust valve solenoid is not getting stuck between the vacuum tank and the carbon filter.



The third picture is the empty space left after removing the filter.
Slide the new filter exactly in the same way from above. Make sure that the filter is oriented in the right way, the fuel tank union must be facing towards the engine compartment inner side. Make sure that the filter is sitting correctly on the assembly. A bracket part of the assembly will hold the filter from underneath. Put back the bracket which was left under the vacuum tank (on the heat shield) and screw it back on the assembly. Tighten the 3 bolds holding the assembly.
Attached Images
     
StefVan is online now  
post #17 of 40 Old 11-05-2011, 03:51 AM Thread Starter
Owner
 
StefVan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Switzerland
Ferrari Life Posts: 2,343
Now we can put back the 4 hoses on the carbon filter :

- At the rear, the rigid air pump pipe.
- In the middle, the 2 small purge hoses.
- In the front, the fuel vapour separation hose.


Make sure you hear a distinctive "click" when pushing the hoses back on the filter unions. These hoses are monitored by the Motronic Ecu's and any leak will trigger a CEL.

I took the chance also to repair the fuel vapour pipe because the
protection layer was getting loose nearby the filter union connection.

While the carbon filter is out, it's also a good chance to clean up this area, especially the air pump and the solenoid valves + electrical
connectors.

The first picture shows the newly installed carbon filter while the second picture gives an overview of the fuel anti-evaporation system.


Job done

The next job will be replacing the accessory engine belt that drives the alternator, the power steering pump, the air conditioning compressor and the water pump.
Attached Images
   

Last edited by StefVan; 11-05-2011 at 04:13 AM.
StefVan is online now  
post #18 of 40 Old 11-17-2011, 12:54 PM Thread Starter
Owner
 
StefVan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Switzerland
Ferrari Life Posts: 2,343
Replacing the accessory belt

The next step is to change the accessory belt which must be done from under the engine. I changed mine at 50.000 km even if the belt was still in very good condition with no signs of wear at all. But I didnít want to take any risk for a couple of dollars belt and as all the underbody panels are already removed for a general inspection and oil change, itís a good opportunity to change it.


The first thing I noticed is that the existing belt had no indication of direction while my new belt has one as you can see on this picture. I donít know the reason of this change but I took this in consideration when installing the new belt.

Name:  Accessory belt 1.jpg
Views: 3776
Size:  71.6 KB
Name:  Accessory belt 2.jpg
Views: 3681
Size:  71.9 KB
Name:  Accessory belt 3.jpg
Views: 3689
Size:  71.3 KB

Before removing the existing belt, study first how the existing belt is installed around the engine wheel, A/C compressor, power steering pump, roller, alternator, mobile roller tensioner and back around the engine wheel. I wanted also to correct what I wrote at the end of my previous post: The water or coolant centrifugal pump is not driven by the accessory belt but is part of the oil pump which is controlled by the crankshaft and a chain. This makes the accessory belt less critical in case of rupture.

Name:  Accessory belt 4.jpg
Views: 3768
Size:  50.6 KB
Name:  Accessory belt 5.jpg
Views: 4177
Size:  52.1 KB

Belt removal:
With a 15mm wench, turn the mobile roller tensioner anticlockwise to loosen the belt and at the same time, pull the belt of the A/C compressor pulley and subsequently from the other pulleys.


Inspect carefully the plastic part of the two rollers. Yes, these two rollers are in plastic and they have to support more than 8200 rpm! They should turn freely on their axes. Replace them if there is any sign of wear.

New Belt installation:
Make sure to respect the direction arrow printed on the belt and install it exactly as it was removed starting with the alternator and finishing with the A/C compressor by turning the mobile roller tensioner anticlockwise.

Run the engine to make sure that the belt is fitted well. From above the engine, you should see around the alternator pulley,the belt marks passing by at regular interval.


A couple of more pictures of the new installed belt:
Name:  Accessory belt 6.jpg
Views: 3630
Size:  39.5 KB
Name:  Accessory belt 7.jpg
Views: 3618
Size:  32.7 KB
Name:  Accessory belt 8.jpg
Views: 3650
Size:  49.6 KB
Name:  Accessory belt 9.jpg
Views: 3608
Size:  32.0 KB

StefVan is online now  
post #19 of 40 Old 11-17-2011, 12:59 PM
Owner
Elite Member
 
tazandjan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Albuquerque, NM
Ferrari Life Posts: 11,859
Stef- How are you setting tension on the new belt? Should be 115 plus or minus 5 hz from the WSM. We found an inexpensive sonic tensiometer if you need one. ~$250.

Taz
Terry Phillips

Present: 575M 135171
Past: Dino 246 GT 02984, 365 GTB/4 14009, 308 GTS 25125

Every day I look around, and if nobody is shooting at me, it is a pretty good day.
tazandjan is online now  
post #20 of 40 Old 11-17-2011, 01:16 PM Thread Starter
Owner
 
StefVan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Switzerland
Ferrari Life Posts: 2,343
Thanks very much Terry, you're right, I saw that also in the WSM but I didn't use one.

Iím not really convinced that such tensiometer will help a lot in checking the frequency of 115Hz because it all depends on the components used in the new belt (which is definitely manufactured differently than the original belt).

I just checked the mobile tensioner to make sure it was operating normally and applying enough tension on the belt. It can be checked very easily with a running engine. If the belt is too loose, it will vibrate between the power steering pump and the alternator (the longest part) and if it is really loose, it will not even follow the engine revolutions with the typical slipping noise. With the engine warmed up, I also inspected the belt with a couple of high revs. It shouldnít vibrate or slip at all.
StefVan is online now  
Reply

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome
Copyright 2012 ONE Media, Inc.
FerrariLife is independently run with no affiliation with Ferrari SpA
Ferrari for Sale | Maserati for Sale