Is buying a Ferrari a serious commitment? - Ferrari Life
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post #1 of 25 Old 01-13-2010, 03:24 AM Thread Starter
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Is buying a Ferrari a serious commitment?

Is it? Time and care, is it raining outside? haven't start her for a while is the battery dead? Books Videos Forums the whole nine yards so to speaking, therefore i ask you is it a serious commitment?

Cheers
D
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post #2 of 25 Old 01-13-2010, 04:14 AM
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Dave, I think your question should be: is being a car enthousiast a serious commitment? In that case, I would answer yes.

There are plenty of Ferrari owners that do not commit to the car (see the Gerald Roush thread) or forums or things like that. And with a modern Ferrari, they don't need to either. If you have enough cash you can let somebody else worry about that stuff.

For me personally, my Ferraris take up a heck of a lot of my time. And I'm thankful for that! Although I do see myself spending less time on this hobby sometime in the future, I do have a lot of other interests that are currently not getting the attention they used to.

Anyway, it would be the same if I had an MGB or TR3 or something pre-war. It's not because they are Ferraris that they take up my time. It's because they are fun cars.


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post #3 of 25 Old 01-13-2010, 04:21 AM
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Ferrari ownership is what you make of it. Like everything else in life. Is your relationship a big commitment? Mine is, just celebrated 25 years. For many, it is not.



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post #4 of 25 Old 01-13-2010, 11:21 AM
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While I agree with Wet and Onno

I have to answer this question more directly: YES, much more commitment than mass produced cars [over 10,000/year].

Quote:
Time and care, is it raining outside? haven't start her for a while is the battery dead? Books Videos Forums the whole nine yards so to speaking, therefore i ask you is it a serious commitment
You should drive these cars and not just garage them, or things will absolutely go wrong. While seals or fluids may not go to bad, IF they do or are marginal then you'll certainly find out when the time comes, and quickly.

Tires will need to be cared for a bit better in that 'some' persons put them to a limit, and that is nothing to play with.

Fluids, I find well worth the change on a yearly basis, as I've replaced 'stuff' when not done regularly and I'm not saying they go 'toastie' quickly but it is certainly very cheap insurance to no go the expensive route. Such as heater cores, radiators, wires, plugs/connectors, and hoses not to mention mounts and suspension components: I know these are designed almost very well, BUT, honestly they sometimes fall short in the final implementation/production. I know that Ferrari outsources some well designed items to 'Guidos 3rd cousin' and you get back [whatever] for the local shops. There should be NO REASON for Ferrari to have lousy parts, but they do.

Case closed on that.

The newer -- Porsche-like -- models such as the CA or 458 etc. will be a 'bit' better but not by much.

Batteries will absolutly go south if not on a charger. The ECU's and stuff needing power will drain that baby in about 5-10 days easily.

NOT driving them with a proper warmup, or keeping the charge on battery done, or cooling them properly after a run [for sure a sprited run] will eventually cause problems. Remembering that most of the wear and tear is on startup, these are dry sumps, and you'll need to pay attention to temps etc.

I know there are exceptions, I know people have stored them in garages for over a year with no problems IN THE SHORT RUN ,as I've seen about five rebuilds on 456 engines over the last seven years to say otherwise: 'Gentleman's' cars are not driven or maintained very well.

I will say, nonsense to lacking in care.

Note my signature: If you treat your Ferrari like a horse, you'll know what I'm saying:

1. proper warmup
2. take to trot
3. take to gallop: Necessary, and do so for about 20 min. ON/OFF the pace
4. Cool down,
5. check the vitals
6. Put in 'barn' correctly
7. Feed it well: oils, etc.

Having grownup with many horses, more than vehicles in my life, I can say they are not far off those hay burners....Matter of fact, add that to the list: HAYBURNERS, more costly to keep if a hobby than the work they perform. Look good in the saddle, fun to run, but can't pull a plow worth a darn.

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Last edited by Granucci; 01-13-2010 at 11:30 AM.
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post #5 of 25 Old 01-13-2010, 11:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Lee View Post
Is it? Time and care, is it raining outside? haven't start her for a while is the battery dead? Books Videos Forums the whole nine yards so to speaking, therefore i ask you is it a serious commitment?
Commitment? Probably as per earlier comments. But one that has great returns, sort of pays back in kind.

It makes one aware of so many small things I for one never cared for: what's the weather like? when/where will it rain? how does the road look, the tarmac feel? is that a pothole?! etc.

And then there's the thrill of looking at it (i.e. any 'pet' car), each and every time you see it. There's the sensation of adventure starting it up: will it be OK?! There's the momentous rumble/scream of the engine, the feel of its idiosyncratic controls, the rush of speed once the "go" is there after warm-up. There's the fabulous handling, the flow.

I don't mind committing to all that and then some...

A horse is a horse, of course, of course, and no one can talk to a horse of course. That is, of course, unless the horse is the famous Mister F.
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post #6 of 25 Old 01-13-2010, 11:37 AM
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Originally Posted by IPF View Post
Commitment? Probably as per earlier comments. But one that has great returns, sort of pays back in kind.
I don't mind committing to all that and then some...

like my dogs and cats, my horses did nudge me

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post #7 of 25 Old 01-13-2010, 11:39 AM
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I agree - it is a serious committment but only if you want it to be.

I only wish I could spend more "car time" but unless I give up sleeping its not going to happen any time soon!!

Ferrari's: 360 Modena, 550 Maranello
Ex's: Dino 308 GT4, 612 Scaglietti
The Rest: Rolls Royce Silver Shadow, Porsche 911 2.7s, Porsche 911 3.2 Carerra, Ducati 916... and the Land Rovers
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post #8 of 25 Old 01-13-2010, 11:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Granucci View Post
like my dogs and cats, my horses did nudge me
Yeah, and sometimes the horsey leaves a little puddle of nasty on the garage floor too...

A horse is a horse, of course, of course, and no one can talk to a horse of course. That is, of course, unless the horse is the famous Mister F.
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post #9 of 25 Old 01-13-2010, 12:29 PM
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Yeah, and sometimes the horsey leaves a little puddle of nasty on the garage floor too...
true, true. almost forgot.

Guide to the Galaxy: Don't Panic
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post #10 of 25 Old 01-13-2010, 12:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Granucci View Post
I have to answer this question more directly: YES, much more commitment than mass produced cars [over 10,000/year].
Rik, I don't quite agree. I met a guy that did 100,000 miles in his 550 in 3 years, never had a problem. His 550 undoubtedly didn't look very nice anymore (didn't see it myself), but that is the difference: in your regular car you just don't care. You treat it with less respect and it starts looking scruffy after only a couple of years. My 550 is 10 years old coming August and looks like new, my 330 GTC has been restored 20 years ago and looks like new. Your daily driver could look the same if you put in the care that you do your Ferraris. But most people don't. I don't have the leather in my Beamer restored every couple of years, but in my Ferrari I do.

Obviously, if every Ferrari was used like a Toyota then they would be less reliable than Toyotas simply because the cars are much lower volumes and not everything can be tested to destruction. And performance vehicles are always more sensitive and have a narrower optimal performance range. So in that sense I agree with you. But in general I believe we make our Ferraris a big commitment because they deserve it, rather than they need it.

And again - this is IMHO not really Ferrari specific, any number of special or classic cars would fit the bill.


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post #11 of 25 Old 01-13-2010, 02:37 PM
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Think we are just agreeing

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Rik, I don't quite agree. I met a guy that did 100,000 miles in his 550 in 3 years, never had a problem.
This proves my point: They must be used, and not garaged. There is a local TR with > 250,000 miles as of last year, in the Bay Area: Brian Crall, IIRC, services it and swears up and down about it.

However, if that TR were a queen or not used properly, I would absolutley expect more service calls. Can't just jump in it cold, turn the key, hop to the store short distance away, drive home and jump out all day long.

Seen some with so much rust in the cylinders after an imporper stint in a garage that when they turn them on, old gas, water in the brake lines, rust in the radiator, corrosion in the al parts, etc. etc. they become amazed as to why. Actually, most of these people are not committed to the venue or familiar with them enought to treat them IMHO correctly.

Not meant for that. Wish it were. My Mondial T is more forgiving once warmed up, but I wouldn't be doing that with the 12 cylinder.


Quote:
Obviously, if every Ferrari was used like a Toyota then they would be less reliable than Toyotas simply because the cars are much lower volumes and not everything can be tested to destruction. And performance vehicles are always more sensitive and have a narrower optimal performance range. So in that sense I agree with you. But in general I believe we make our Ferraris a big commitment because they deserve it, rather than they need it.

And again - this is IMHO not really Ferrari specific, any number of special or classic cars would fit the bill.


Onno
+1, but in a way we are agreeing in different words.

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post #12 of 25 Old 01-13-2010, 02:59 PM
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Part of the commitment of owning a Ferrari is to realize that some day it will be some one else's dream car. Old Ferraris are almost never disposed of, but rather, get restored by some new owner. So, even if you keep you beloved Ferrari your whole life, eventually it is likely to be owned by some one else after you die. So, we all have an obligation to keep such a special car in good shape and don't lose the extra pieces to it (tool kit, key fobs, window sticker, service docs, pictures, etc.) These are all potential cherished possessions of a future owner.

Ferraris are known by the Serial Number part of their VIN. Unlike other manufacturers, each Ferrari has a unique number. The earliest cars are a 4 digit number. The latest ones are a 6 digit number. But your Ferrari is known world-wide by that unique number. It is like a numbered work of art. Think of your car as "one of one". We are lucky to claim ownership to such a special item for the years we do.
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post #13 of 25 Old 01-13-2010, 03:26 PM
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Quote:
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+1, but in a way we are agreeing in different words.
I guess we are!

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post #14 of 25 Old 01-13-2010, 09:35 PM
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What do you guys think is the minimum one should drive your Ferrari in order to avoid the garage queen problems mentioned above? Is, say, a 50-75 mile spirited romp with appropriate warm up/cool down times every two weeks (plus servicing of course) sufficient to keep the car in top condition?
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post #15 of 25 Old 01-14-2010, 04:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Granucci View Post
.

Note my signature: If you treat your Ferrari like a horse, you'll know what I'm saying:

1. proper warmup
2. take to trot
3. take to gallop: Necessary, and do so for about 20 min. ON/OFF the pace
4. Cool down,
5. check the vitals
6. Put in 'barn' correctly
7. Feed it well: oils, etc.
.
Some really good advice and opinion on all of this thread.
Reference the list by Granucci - I know nothing about horses and didnt realise they needed to do this although it makes sense as it mirrors almost exactly what I do when weight training.
Drilling down, I am seeking advice relating to item 6. My house was built by a spec builder and consequently the build standard is " what the market will take". Not bad but could have been alot better. One manifestation of this was the garage. The concrete floor was of low cement content, not compacted to a high standard and not dust proofed. Last year I nearly fixed the dust problem with 2pac epoxy paint but never got round to it - although I have the paint.
Now I am considering tiling the floor. This will allow me to fit electric underfloor heating under the tiles. The advice sought is this:- I have read that its best to keep the garage warm all the time or not at all. Intermittent use in cold periods causes condensation particularly in the cars internal fluids and cavities. Some (on another forum thread) have said its best to let the cars become cold.

Any advice / experience on this would be appreciated - both with regard to the care of the car and the experience of having a tiled garage ( durability, suitability etc)

Thanks
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post #16 of 25 Old 01-14-2010, 09:26 AM
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That's gonna depend on a lot of things. for example, my garage is connected to the house and has heated space next to it and on top of it. The temp outside is now in the 20's and has been for weeks. My garage never really dips below 50. all Fahrenheit. i see no need to heat it. don't know about your situation, but i can't imagine the cars need to be above a certain temp at all times. If anything, maybe control the humidity. but i wouldn't worry about it at all with a modern ferrari. The biggest problems for the materials used on the car are sunlight and moisture. if the car is not baking in the sun or getting soaked all the time, i don't think you will have any problems.



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post #17 of 25 Old 01-16-2010, 08:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ollenaram550 View Post
Drilling down, I am seeking advice relating to item 6. My house was built by a spec builder and consequently the build standard is " what the market will take". Not bad but could have been alot better. One manifestation of this was the garage. The concrete floor was of low cement content, not compacted to a high standard and not dust proofed. Last year I nearly fixed the dust problem with 2pac epoxy paint but never got round to it - although I have the paint.
Now I am considering tiling the floor. This will allow me to fit electric underfloor heating under the tiles. The advice sought is this:- I have read that its best to keep the garage warm all the time or not at all. Intermittent use in cold periods causes condensation particularly in the cars internal fluids and cavities. Some (on another forum thread) have said its best to let the cars become cold.

Any advice / experience on this would be appreciated - both with regard to the care of the car and the experience of having a tiled garage ( durability, suitability etc)

Thanks
Sir-
I am a masonry contractor and built my dream garage 7 or so years ago. I have used the electric grids on several bathroom remodels and out side stairs in our local ski resort. I'd have to say I'm less than impressed with electric heat in concrete. Lots of breakage and an odd electrolysis problem that leads to total breakdown of cement base. Possibly, you might raise floor of garage 2-3" and use glycol/water mix with boiler. Or,remove existing concrete and pour new over radiant tube. Cost more in beginning but will pay for itself in short time( here in states, electric much more expensive than gas for boiler). I'm very happy with my system as once I get 2000 square foot slab warm, even opening doors in -20 degree doesn't lose heat. If I can be of help please let me know. Bill Ward
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post #18 of 25 Old 01-16-2010, 01:17 PM
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Lovely thread, very interesting. I've now been the proud owner of my F430 since Thursday and I still haven't been able to use it. The snow has cleared, and now the rain! Oh boy...

Anyway, can you educated guys enlighten me please to the correct way to "warm up and cool down"

Cheers everyone.
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post #19 of 25 Old 01-16-2010, 01:25 PM
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Anyway, can you educated guys enlighten me please to the correct way to "warm up and cool down"
Not much to it in a modern Ferrari - just let the oil warm a bit before going 11/10ths. I have no experience with semi-automatics but I would suggest it is best to not set it to Race or CST off before she's warm - the semi-automatic shifts exactly like a normal person does, except much faster. So when the oil's cold, you don't want the mechanism to force the shifts through. Let her take her time at first, would be my suggestion.

As for cool down - I don't do anything in particular with my 550.


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post #20 of 25 Old 01-19-2010, 04:39 AM
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Anyway, can you educated guys enlighten me please to the correct way to "warm up and cool down"

Cheers everyone.
Not than I am educated, but I take it easy for the first 10mins driving to the main roads around us, keep revs below 5000 for the next 10mins, giving the fluids time to heat up and get around the systems. Also gets the tires up in temp, amazing how the tyre pressures can vary by 0.4-0.5bar from the start of a run to the end.

Cool down i'm not so good at, just allow everything to take its time during the final 10km back home. Never had any problems, but do start her up each week when garaged for a longer time - like this winter.
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