Must-read books before you die - Ferrari Life
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 15 Old 05-26-2008, 03:18 PM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Ferrari Life Posts: 1,516
Must-read books before you die

As indicated in the Tom Sawyer topic, here is the list of books I want to read in the not-so-far-away-future.

Just today I bought Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson, The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde and some book with Wilde-quotes (he is just an eminently quotable fellow).

If anyone has any suggestions to add, please share !!!! I'm always looking for good books to add. I would however like a reason why I (or anyone else) should read it

American Boys’ Handy Book
First Edition of the The Boy Scout Handbook

Catch me if you can - Frank Abagnale
Salmon of doubt - Douglas Adams
The Divine Comedy - Dante Alighieri
The Politics - Aristotle
Foundation (and Foundation & Empire and other sequels) - Isaac Asimov
Fahrenheit 451 - Ray Bradbury
Martian Chronicles - Ray Bradbury
Tarzan of the Apes - Edgar Rice Burroughs
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland - Lewis Caroll
The Long Goodbye - Raymond Chandler
2001, 2010, 2061, 3001 - Arthur C. Clarke
Robinson Crusoe - Daniel Dafoe
Everything he ever wrote - Roald Dahl
White Noise - Don Delillo
Crime and Punishment - Fyodor Dostoevsky
The Idiot - Fyodor Dostoevsky
Brothers Karamazov - Fyodor Dostoevsky
The Count of Monte Cristo - Alexandre Dumas
The Name of the Rose - Umberto Eco
Self Reliance - Ralph Waldo Emerson
Lord of the Flies - William Golding
The Maltese Falcon - Dashiell Hammett
Catch-22 - Joseph Heller
All Dune books - Only Frank Herbert. Not the prequels by his son
The Histories - Herodotus
Brave New World - Aldous Huxley
The Dangerous Book for Boys - Conn and Hal Iggulden
World according to Garp - John Irving
From Here to Eternity - James Jones
The Thin Red Line - James Jones
On the road - Jack Kerouac
One flew over the cuckoo's nest - Ken Kesey
Into Thin Air - John Krakauer
The Prince - Niccolo Machiavelli
The Naked and The Dead - Norman Mailer
Song of fire and ice serie - George R R Martin
I am Legend - Richard Matheson
Paradise Lost - John Milton
Beyond Good and Evil - Freidrich Nietzsche
Master and Commander - Patrick O'Brian
Nineteen eighty-four - George Orwell
Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance - Robert Pirsig
The Republic - Plato
Lives of the Noble Greeks and Romans - Plutarch
All Discworld books (about 30 I believe) - Terry Pratchett
Another Roadside Attraction - Tom Robbins
Harry Potter series - J.K. Rowling
Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra
The Catcher in the Rye - J.D. Salinger
The Killer Angels - Michael Shaara
Frankenstein - Mary Wollstonecraft Shelly
The Wealth of Nations - Adam Smith
Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde - Robert Louis Stevenson
Dracula - Bram Stoker
Silmarillion - JRR Tolkien
War and Peace - Leo Tolstoy
Confederacy of Dunces - John Kennedy Toole
The secret diary of Adrian Mole - Sue Townsend
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - Mark Twain
Tom Sawyer - Mark Twain
The Art of Warfare - Sun Tzu
Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea - Jules Verne (plus several other Verne works)
Bluebeard - Kurt Vonnegut
The Time Machine/War of the worlds/Island of Dr. Moreau/collected works - H.G. Wells
Swiss Family Robinson - Johann David Wyss


*more recent, and perhaps more political books I got the idea of reading from guests in shows like The Colbert Report and The Daily Show*

The Candy Bombers - Andrei Cherny
I am America and so can you - Stephen Colbert
Charlie Wilson's War - George Crile
The 10 most beautifull experiments - George Johnson
When science goes wrong - Simon Levay
The man who pushed America to war - Aram Roston
White House ghosts - Robert Schlesinger
Naked Pictures of Famous People - Jon Stewart
America (The Book): A Citizen's Guide to Democracy Inaction - Jon Stewart
Basosz is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 15 Old 05-26-2008, 03:19 PM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Ferrari Life Posts: 1,516
There is also a seperate list of Star Trek books I still need to have, but there's over 600 books there, so I won't post that list here

If you want it, you can get it though
Basosz is offline  
post #3 of 15 Old 05-26-2008, 03:57 PM
Owner
Elite Member
 
Pete04222's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: USA & Singapore
Ferrari Life Posts: 5,509
Great list Basosz, I've read about 13 of the books on there. I'll definately refer to your list for my future reading interests.
I do have some other books for you.
For fiction/fantasy I can recommend:
*The Incarnations of Immortality series by Piers Anthony. A really fun read. Here's a little about it: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Incarna...of_Immortality
*The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant, the Unbeliever a trilogy by Stephen R. Donaldson. A different twist on Tolkien's Lord of the Rings trilogy.

For non-fiction I can recommend:
*Dreadnaught by Robert K. Massie, a very comprehensive history of the British Royal Navy up to WWI.
*Siagon by Anthony Grey is a great book about Vietnam from French Colonial times to the American evacuation. A great read.

There are many others I'll post them as I recall them.

Capt. Pete
'79 308 GTS, '82 Jeep CJ7 Jamboree
"Time is what prevents everything from happening all at once."
Pete04222 is offline  
 
post #4 of 15 Old 05-26-2008, 04:07 PM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Ferrari Life Posts: 1,516
Thanks for the suggestions Pete, I'll add them to my own (alphabetized, I was getting confused) list

I have to wonder though... I was just thinking that Machiavelli would be a great read for you and Archie at RAPE. I do believe that your organisation is all about scheming and plotting. Machiavelli would be great in that regard.

About there being many other great reads: you wouldn't believe the numbers of books I got from Top-100 lists I've already perused. I've also discarded a great many of them.

I'm trying to read as fast as I can these days but I've got a bit of a problem. I have a bed on high legs (like the top one on a bunk bed) with a small platform I made to stack my books on. For every book I remove after reading it, I add two or three books. This way I never get through my stack. Plus the fact that my book platform creaks alarmingly everytime I add something I'm getting worried that my whole system is gonna (literally) crash

Another factor slowing me down is 450 Star Trek books... great reads, but it's just sooooooooooooo much

I friggin' LOVE books !!!
Basosz is offline  
post #5 of 15 Old 05-26-2008, 04:25 PM
Owner
Elite Member
 
Pete04222's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: USA & Singapore
Ferrari Life Posts: 5,509
I've never read Machiavelli. Bas, I am so like you when it comes to my love of books. I'm such a geek. I have all my books on bookselves in the basment and they are all sorted according to their Library of Congress call number.

Capt. Pete
'79 308 GTS, '82 Jeep CJ7 Jamboree
"Time is what prevents everything from happening all at once."
Pete04222 is offline  
post #6 of 15 Old 05-26-2008, 04:36 PM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Ferrari Life Posts: 1,516
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete04222 View Post
I've never read Machiavelli.
I really think you should. I've heard it's a huge inspiration to many despots the world over. RAPE would benefit greatly from influence like that. That is not to say that you and Archie aren't completely loonie enough to be dangerous by yourselves, but it never hurts to get historical encouragement

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete04222 View Post
Bas, I am so like you when it comes to my love of books. I'm such a geek. I have all my books on bookselves in the basment and they are all sorted according to their Library of Congress call number.
That is actually a great idea. Too bad the dutch don't have a great central system like the Library of Congress. By the way... isn't the basement dangerous is case of flooding? I keep my books at my parents on the top floor of the house because a) it's my old room and b) water has to rise a HUGE amount before it reaches my precious books. I'd probably die if something were to happen to them
Basosz is offline  
post #7 of 15 Old 05-26-2008, 06:06 PM
Administrator
Elite Member
 
Andrew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: San Francisco
Ferrari Life Posts: 6,320
Here is what I've read from your list (you could guess I was a liberal arts major in college):

The Politics - Aristotle
Fahrenheit 451 - Ray Bradbury
Martian Chronicles - Ray Bradbury
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland - Lewis Caroll
Robinson Crusoe - Daniel Dafoe
Crime and Punishment - Fyodor Dostoevsky
The Idiot - Fyodor Dostoevsky
Brothers Karamazov - Fyodor Dostoevsky
The Count of Monte Cristo - Alexandre Dumas
Lord of the Flies - William Golding
Brave New World - Aldous Huxley
World according to Garp - John Irving
The Thin Red Line - James Jones
On the road - Jack Kerouac
One flew over the cuckoo's nest - Ken Kesey
The Prince - Niccolo Machiavelli
Paradise Lost - John Milton
Beyond Good and Evil - Freidrich Nietzsche
Nineteen eighty-four - George Orwell
The Republic - Plato
Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra
The Catcher in the Rye - J.D. Salinger
The Killer Angels - Michael Shaara
Frankenstein - Mary Wollstonecraft Shelly
The Wealth of Nations - Adam Smith
War and Peace - Leo Tolstoy
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - Mark Twain
Tom Sawyer - Mark Twain
The Art of Warfare - Sun Tzu
Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea - Jules Verne
Andrew is offline  
post #8 of 15 Old 05-26-2008, 06:09 PM
Administrator
Elite Member
 
Andrew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: San Francisco
Ferrari Life Posts: 6,320
Here are some really good modern books that should be on the list:

Atlus Shrugged, Ayn Rand
The Black Swan, Nassim Nicholas Taleb
The Tipping Point, Malcolm Gladwell
Andrew is offline  
post #9 of 15 Old 05-26-2008, 06:48 PM
 
Chrishawk4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Detroit, Michigan
Ferrari Life Posts: 3,874
Fahrenheit 451 - Ray Bradbury
Martian Chronicles - Ray Bradbury
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland - Lewis Caroll
Harry Potter series - J.K. Rowling
Frankenstein - Mary Wollstonecraft Shelly
Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde - Robert Louis Stevenson
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - Mark Twain
Tom Sawyer - Mark Twain
Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea - Jules Verne (plus several other Verne works)
Swiss Family Robinson - Johann David Wyss

Not to bad. I read more of them then I thought.

Chris

“ To accomplish great things, we must not only act, but also dream; not only plan, but also believe.”-Anatole France
"Dude, it's just math"-Pete
Chrishawk4 is offline  
post #10 of 15 Old 05-30-2008, 06:06 PM
Owner
Elite Member
 
Pete04222's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: USA & Singapore
Ferrari Life Posts: 5,509
Quote:
Originally Posted by Basosz View Post
That is actually a great idea. Too bad the dutch don't have a great central system like the Library of Congress. By the way... isn't the basement dangerous is case of flooding? I keep my books at my parents on the top floor of the house because a) it's my old room and b) water has to rise a HUGE amount before it reaches my precious books. I'd probably die if something were to happen to them
You can use the Library of Congress system. I love it. Just go onto their card catalog and look up your books and jot the number down on the inside cover in pencil. I have a label maker and put a label on the spine with the number. Here's the Library of Congress catalog: http://catalog.loc.gov/

Here's the classification outline: http://www.loc.gov/catdir/cpso/lcco/
Here's a pretty good explanation of how it works: http://geography.about.com/library/congress/blhowto.htm and
http://geography.about.com/library/congress/bllc.htm

BTW - I live well above the water table, my basement is very dry and the danger of my basement flooding is extremely low. I also use a dehumidifier in the summer so the humidity of the air is low to prevent damage to the books.

Capt. Pete
'79 308 GTS, '82 Jeep CJ7 Jamboree
"Time is what prevents everything from happening all at once."

Last edited by Pete04222; 05-30-2008 at 06:43 PM.
Pete04222 is offline  
post #11 of 15 Old 05-30-2008, 06:37 PM
Owner
Elite Member
 
Pete04222's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: USA & Singapore
Ferrari Life Posts: 5,509
So for some examples by the LOC classification your first book, What to do and how to do it; the American boys handy book, , would be: GV1201 .B345 1920
G= Geography, Anthropology, Recreation
GV= Recreation, Leisure
GV 1199-1570 = Games and Amusements
GV 1201 = Hobbies (General)
B345 is the cutter number representing the author's last name. Daniel Beard.

Your second book, Catch me if you can, would be: HV6760.A18 A33 2000
Social Sciences; Social Service, Welfare, Criminology; Criminology

I've got some books that are not in the LOC database and by using the classification system I can assign them my own number and shelve them in the proper place.

Capt. Pete
'79 308 GTS, '82 Jeep CJ7 Jamboree
"Time is what prevents everything from happening all at once."
Pete04222 is offline  
post #12 of 15 Old 05-31-2008, 04:03 AM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Ferrari Life Posts: 1,516
Bloody hell... there's 1224 Star Trek books in the LoC. Maybe it is a nice system to use, but I'm not sure about using it for my ST collection. For that I use my own system per series as it's displayed at the end of the books.

But there are still a lot of other books I need to catalog. Pete, how would you use the LoC system for my dutch language books? I have a lot of those, and they definetly need catalogueing as well.

Pete, thanx for the links. I am very likely to use it... if only for the Trek information in it
Basosz is offline  
post #13 of 15 Old 05-31-2008, 05:56 AM
Owner
Elite Member
 
Pete04222's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: USA & Singapore
Ferrari Life Posts: 5,509
Quote:
Originally Posted by Basosz View Post
But there are still a lot of other books I need to catalog. Pete, how would you use the LoC system for my dutch language books? I have a lot of those, and they definetly need catalogueing as well.

Pete, thanx for the links. I am very likely to use it... if only for the Trek information in it
That's a good question. Since the LOC catalog is based by subject, you can just drill down the tables on the links I provided and find the proper code for the subject of your book and assign it your own number. For example if you had a book about the history of the town that you live in in the Netherlands you would catalog it DJ 401. So it would be placed on the shelf before "Catch me if you can". Since you read both languages and want to look for books by subject and don't really care which language they are written in you can intermingle the English books and the Dutch books.

Capt. Pete
'79 308 GTS, '82 Jeep CJ7 Jamboree
"Time is what prevents everything from happening all at once."
Pete04222 is offline  
post #14 of 15 Old 05-31-2008, 05:58 AM
Owner
Elite Member
 
Pete04222's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: USA & Singapore
Ferrari Life Posts: 5,509
Here's some other books you might like to look at for addition to your list of must reads. I didn't look again at you list to see if you already had them but I thought you might like this list:
10 Classic Books That Have Been Banned

1. The Call of the Wild by Jack London was banned in Yugoslavia and Italy and was burned by Nazis.
2. The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck was banned in many places across the U.S., but was particularly banned in California because the book depicted the state badly.
3. The Lorax by Dr. Seuss has been banned across the U.S. for it’s allegorical political commentary.
4. Ulysses by James Joyce was banned for sexual content. The ban was overturned in a court case called the United States vs. One Book Called Ulysses.
5. All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque was banned in Nazi Germany for insulting the Wehrmacht.
6. Animal Farm by George Orwell was delayed in the U.K. because of its anti-Stalin theme. It was confiscated in Germany by Allied troops, banned in Yugoslavia in 1946, banned in Kenya in 1991 and banned in the United Arab Emirates in 2002.
7. As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner was banned in Kentucky because it was “anti-Christian” and contained bad language.
8. Black Beauty by Anna Sewell was banned in South Africa in 1955 for using the world “Black” in the title.
9. The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger was banned in lots of places across the U.S. because the character exhibited “inappropriate” behavior, plus bad language and sexual content.
10. The Giver by Lois Lowry was banned in a few states including California and Kentucky for addressing issues such as euthanasia.

Capt. Pete
'79 308 GTS, '82 Jeep CJ7 Jamboree
"Time is what prevents everything from happening all at once."
Pete04222 is offline  
post #15 of 15 Old 05-31-2008, 08:20 AM
Owner
 
JazzyO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: The Netherlands
Ferrari Life Posts: 6,392
Nice thread. I've always loved to read but have so little time for it, it's irritating. I've read 11 from your list, though, and about double that I would love to read.

Books that have made a big impression on me and that you might like to consider yourself:

1. Een schitterend ongeluk ("a magnificent accident"), Wim Kayzer. Book based on a Dutch TV-series of 3-hour interviews (in English) with the worlds' foremost minds in 7, I think, different fields (science, philosophy, psychiatry, biology and so on) answering the "Ultimate Question". The series finished with these 7 people (among them Oliver Sachs, Stephen Jay Gould and more luminaries) in 1 room debating the meaning of life. Truly one of the most epic things ever broadcast on TV. I have just done a search and it seems you can buy the DVD now. Wow, I can't wait to get my hands on that.

2. Miss Smilla's feeling for Snow. Peter Hoeg. Crime story set in Denmark and Greenland. Beautiful prose - too bad I can't read Danish.

3. Wild Swans, Jung Chang. About being in the Red Brigades in Mao's China.

4. The man who mistook his wife for a hat. Oliver Sachs (of "Awakenings" fame). Series of essays about Mr. Sachs patients who have extremely rare brain disorders. He writes so compassionately about them and their disorders are so fascinating, you see the beauty behind the tragedy.

5. The Discovery of Heaven (orginal title: De Ontdekking van de Hemel), Harry Mulisch. Epic work worthy of the Nobel prize.

6. A small history of everything, Bill Bryson. Sheer entertainment if you have an enquiring mind.

7. A brief history of time, Stephen Hawking. Every couple of years I like to try and convince myself I could have been a physicist. I love this book except for the chapter on quantum mechanics. Best to borrow another book for that as Stephen tries to prove QM by making his words act like electrons: the closer you get to the meaning, the less likely you are to understand it....

8. I Claudius and Claudius the God, Robert Graves. I read these, no matter what, every couple of years. I'm fascinated with the Augustan period of Roman history but it's particularly the quality of writing and research that makes this book stand out. The BBC television series was also brilliant. If you ever go to Rome, read these books just before you go. To stand in Tiberius' house knowing what he did there, is a special experience indeed....


Onno



Never pay again for live sex! | Hot girls doing naughty stuff for free! | Chat for free!
JazzyO is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome
Copyright 2012 ONE Media, Inc.
FerrariLife is independently run with no affiliation with Ferrari SpA
Ferrari for Sale | Maserati for Sale