Safety on board: FIRE! - Ferrari Life
 
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post #1 of 10 Old 03-02-2012, 03:26 PM Thread Starter
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Safety on board: FIRE!

We've seen some threads re. Spontanious Car Combustion....

As I can't find a thread discussing how to handle or extinghuis fires in our so very expensive and much loved cars (god forbid..) I was wondering whether you guys have a fire extinghuiser on board and if so:
- powder or foam
- what brand
- where/how did you mount it
- remote controlled?
- experiences
- anything else that might be worthwhile mentioning....?

Jeroen

Italian bella's:
550 Maranello 7-2000 nero/nero
1974 Ducati 750 Yellow Sport
1974 Ducati 350 Desmo Yellow Sport
2010 Ducati Multistrada 1200S
(And a few Alfa Romeo's and Range Rovers)

Power is nothing without control
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post #2 of 10 Old 03-02-2012, 04:01 PM
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We've had a couple posted experiences here, to include one in a gas station which totaled and the occupants were darn lucky.

Someone'll chime in on the best system, probably adapted form of racing getup I expect.

Guide to the Galaxy: Don't Panic
Rik -- LAH !


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post #3 of 10 Old 03-02-2012, 06:10 PM
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post #4 of 10 Old 03-03-2012, 02:36 AM
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When I live in Belgium circa 1995 a hand held fire extinguisher mounted inside the passenger compartment was legally mandatory. When I brought the car I had, back to France, before European homologation standards, I was told to remove it from the inside and mount it in the boot/trunk if I wanted to keep it, as a five kilogramme hunk of metal breaking loose inside the car in an accident is a dangerous projectile. I agree, so trunk mounting for a hand held bracket mounted extinguisher.

Depending on the source and size of the fire the treatment is different. For an electrical smouldering fire, isolate the battery and use a dry powder extinguisher. Dry powder is effective against electric smouldering fires. I and my son saved his BMW this way. The fire was due to a short.

If the fire is near fuel lines or the tank, I agree with the comment of getting everyone out, stand well back, call the professional emergency services and watch it burn. Have good fire insurance. Even in an accident where there is no immediate fire, get everyone out and away, unless serious injuries are suspected, in which case do not move the person unless fire actually breaks out. Wait for the professionals. The fire may break out later, as in the Greek car accident mentioned in another thread.

Fire extinguishers have "sell-by" dates and they do deteriorate with time. When I worked in the petroleum industry we were trained to deal with small petroleum fires in laboratories. Even a few litres of gasoline, goes "WHOOF!" when lit and is very hot, very rapidly and is intimidating. As they say in children's programmes on the television, this is not something you should try at home! (I never did the more impressive refinery fire training!!!)
If you must treat the fire, while an injured person is extracted for example, aim the jet of the extinguisher at the base of the flames, not just in the general direction, and get down low, it is slightly cooler and the flames rise off the actual point of combustion.

One 5Kg extinguisher does not go far.
If possible protect yourself with clothing, gloves in particular. Bare skin barbecues rapidly.
Hope this is advice nobody ever needs!
Nigel

'97 Rosso Corsa 550 Maranello
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post #5 of 10 Old 03-03-2012, 04:14 AM
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This is the extinguisher I carry in all my cars and have in the kitchen: Fire Extinguishers for Home, Shop, Auto, RV & Camping

Dry chemical extinguishers will definately put a fire out, but for a small fire caught quickly, the extinguisher can do more damage then the fire did. I've worked on 2 cars that had small engine fires that were put out with dry chems and that stuff goes everywhere! Yeah the fire's out but man what a mess! These FireAde extinguishers are easy to use and don't leave a mess behind.

Capt. Pete
'79 308 GTS, '82 Jeep CJ7 Jamboree
"Time is what prevents everything from happening all at once."
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post #6 of 10 Old 03-03-2012, 10:25 PM
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I have this thing about car fires....I also agree with Ed, any fire bigger than a basketball....back up and let it burn.....dont get stupid and risk your life....things do go boom.


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Mario

1990 348 TS (87284)

“I build cars for young men that only old men can afford” - Enzo Ferrari
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post #7 of 10 Old 03-04-2012, 02:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NigelV12 View Post
When I live in Belgium circa 1995 a hand held fire extinguisher mounted inside the passenger compartment was legally mandatory. When I brought the car I had, back to France, before European homologation standards, I was told to remove it from the inside and mount it in the boot/trunk if I wanted to keep it, as a five kilogramme hunk of metal breaking loose inside the car in an accident is a dangerous projectile. I agree, so trunk mounting for a hand held bracket mounted extinguisher.

Depending on the source and size of the fire the treatment is different. For an electrical smouldering fire, isolate the battery and use a dry powder extinguisher. Dry powder is effective against electric smouldering fires. I and my son saved his BMW this way. The fire was due to a short.

If the fire is near fuel lines or the tank, I agree with the comment of getting everyone out, stand well back, call the professional emergency services and watch it burn. Have good fire insurance. Even in an accident where there is no immediate fire, get everyone out and away, unless serious injuries are suspected, in which case do not move the person unless fire actually breaks out. Wait for the professionals. The fire may break out later, as in the Greek car accident mentioned in another thread.

Fire extinguishers have "sell-by" dates and they do deteriorate with time. When I worked in the petroleum industry we were trained to deal with small petroleum fires in laboratories. Even a few litres of gasoline, goes "WHOOF!" when lit and is very hot, very rapidly and is intimidating. As they say in children's programmes on the television, this is not something you should try at home! (I never did the more impressive refinery fire training!!!)
If you must treat the fire, while an injured person is extracted for example, aim the jet of the extinguisher at the base of the flames, not just in the general direction, and get down low, it is slightly cooler and the flames rise off the actual point of combustion.

One 5Kg extinguisher does not go far.
If possible protect yourself with clothing, gloves in particular. Bare skin barbecues rapidly.
Hope this is advice nobody ever needs!
Nigel
Great comment! All those F40 owners with fire expirience would agree to it. Thank you Nigel. Will you join fled 6 partially ?
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post #8 of 10 Old 03-04-2012, 03:07 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the comments so far. Although I agree about not risking anything, I think there's a lot in between trying to be a hero and being able to save your car (or someone else's for that matter)

Jeroen

Italian bella's:
550 Maranello 7-2000 nero/nero
1974 Ducati 750 Yellow Sport
1974 Ducati 350 Desmo Yellow Sport
2010 Ducati Multistrada 1200S
(And a few Alfa Romeo's and Range Rovers)

Power is nothing without control
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post #9 of 10 Old 03-04-2012, 06:01 AM
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212export: I'm with FLED 6 from the start and am looking forward to it.
Nigel

'97 Rosso Corsa 550 Maranello
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post #10 of 10 Old 03-04-2012, 06:02 AM
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An untrained people attacking a fire is ... NUTS!

I have been to many fire training sessions - surprised these cars don't have some sort of smoke detector alert.

A smoke detector is the first alert of danger - once the fire is noticed it's time to gather and run.

I can't stress enough - make sure all your detectors are working and extinguishers are updated.
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