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post #1 of 41 Old 12-10-2010, 08:40 AM Thread Starter
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Tools

With all the projects going on in the section I thought it would be great to get a tools thread going. Show off your tool cabinet and any special equipment you might have in the garage. Often having the right tools is critical for any job.
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post #2 of 41 Old 12-12-2010, 05:10 PM
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I don't think I have any "real" cool tools to post but I'll post something when I get on my laptop. The iPads only flaw that I can't post pictures from it.
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post #3 of 41 Old 12-12-2010, 06:47 PM
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OK, here's a picture of a early Christmas gift for myself.

I got tired of the cheap one always giving me problems with wrong numbers. 2 new batteries and it still was going wacky. Numbers bouncing around all the time.
It just drove me crazy. CRAZY i tell yah!!

One is made in China and the other one is made in Japan. (i haven't seen "made in Japan" for years)

Guess which is which.
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post #4 of 41 Old 12-12-2010, 08:50 PM Thread Starter
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I am guessing the bottom (gray) is the one made in Japan. The extent of my tool set for car work is a metric ratchet set. My next purchase will likely have to be something to read ODBII codes.
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post #5 of 41 Old 12-13-2010, 07:26 AM
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I'll go Japan bottom one too...

Ferrari's: 360 Modena, 550 Maranello
Ex's: Dino 308 GT4, 612 Scaglietti
The Rest: Rolls Royce Silver Shadow, Porsche 911 2.7s, Porsche 911 3.2 Carerra, Ducati 916... and the Land Rovers
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post #6 of 41 Old 12-13-2010, 10:56 AM
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Yes, it's the bottom one.

I guess that was to easy.
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post #7 of 41 Old 12-14-2010, 08:49 AM
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My tool carts aren't very photogenic; they look sorta like their owner, old and well used. But here's a pic of some of the handiest tools that I have.

The top one will be recognisable to anyone who's worked on motorbikes or karts, and is a manual impact tool. Great for loosening (or tightening) fasteners on small engines where an air impact tool is OTT.

Next down is an AC/DC current probe for the DVM. The DC capability is great when you're trying to track down those milliampere gremlins that come in the night and steal your battery's charge.

Next is the infrared thermometer. Great for seeing if your radiator is doing its job, but absolutely indispensable on the engine dyno to "shoot" exhaust headers and find which ones are running hotter than the rest, so you can tweak their injectors.

Finally the old faithful inductive timing light. This one is over 30 years old and still works fine. It's even sensitive enough to be used for COP's, and I was amazed a few years ago to find that it would pick up injector trigger pulses also. Extremely handy to have on the engine dyno if you're looking for ignition or injector problems. So while it may be a relic from the 70's, it still works well, and is even more useful today than it was 30+ years ago.

The last tool, which I forgot to take a pic of, is the leakdown tester. This and the compression tester can tell volumes about the health of a motor. I like to use the leakdown tester with an engine on an engine stand, before the cams go in, and with intake & exhaust blockoff plates, in order to tell exactly where each cylinder's leakage is, and to quantify it.
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'99 550, Rosso Corsa / Nero, S/N:114654, Assy: 31836, Engine: 52084

High mileage, low compression, and missing on a few cylinders.....just like my cars.

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post #8 of 41 Old 12-14-2010, 09:36 AM
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Thats a cool little impact tool. Never seen one before.

I was introduced to the butterfly impact a few years ago and I thought THAT was a cool little impact. I guess I was wrong.
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post #9 of 41 Old 12-14-2010, 09:42 AM
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Those manual impacts are great. I don't use it often but when I need it, I need it. Nothing better for removing phillips head screws that are stripped or starting to strip. I think my oxy/acet torches are the one item I couldn't live without.

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post #10 of 41 Old 12-14-2010, 09:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrew View Post
I am guessing the bottom (gray) is the one made in Japan. The extent of my tool set for car work is a metric ratchet set. My next purchase will likely have to be something to read ODBII codes.
Spend a little extra and get one that can read the live data stream. Actron makes one that sells for $150 or maybe less. The cheaper ones that just read codes and clear them are not as usefull.

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post #11 of 41 Old 12-18-2010, 11:59 PM
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Tool Definitions

PEDESTAL DRILL: a tall upright machine useful for suddenly snatching
flat bar stock out of your hands so that it smacks you in the chest and flings
your beer across the room, splattering it against that freshly painted part
you were drying.

WIRE WHEEL: cleans paint off bolts and then throws them somewhere
under the workbench at the speed of light. Also removes fingerprint
whorls and hard-earned guitar calluses in about the time it takes you
to say, "Ba****d...."

ELECTRIC HAND DRILL: normally used for spinning pop rivets in their
holes until you die of old age.

PLIERS: used to round off bolt heads.

HACKSAW: one of a family of cutting tools built on the Ouija board
principle. It transforms human energy into a crooked, unpredictable
motion, and the more you attempt to influence its course, the more
dismal your future becomes.

VICE-GRIPS: used to round off bolt heads. If nothing else is
available, they can also be used to transfer intense welding heat to
the palm of your hand.

OXY-ACETYLENE TORCH: used almost entirely for lighting on fire various
flammable objects in your workshop. Also handy for igniting the grease
inside the wheel hub you want the bearing race out of.

WHITWORTH SOCKETS: once used for working on older cars and
motorcycles, they are now used mainly for impersonating that 13mm
socket you've been searching for the last 15 minutes.

HYDRAULIC FLOOR JACK: used for lowering an automobile to the ground
after you have installed your new disk brake pads, trapping the jack
handle firmly under the bumper.

EIGHT-FOOT LONG 2 x 4: used for levering an automobile upward off a
hydraulic jack handle.

TWEEZERS: a tool for removing wood splinters (see 2 x 4 above).

PHONE: tool for calling your neighbour to see if he has another
hydraulic floor jack.

E-Z OUT BOLT AND STUD EXTRACTOR: a tool ten times harder than any
known drill bit - that snaps off in bolt holes you couldn't use
anyway.

TWO-TON ENGINE HOIST: a tool for testing the tensile strength on
everything you forgot to disconnect.

CRAFTSMAN 13mm x 400mm SCREWDRIVER: a large prybar that inexplicably
has an accurately machined screwdriver tip on the end opposite the
handle.

INSPECTION LIGHT: the home mechanic's own tanning booth - it is a good
source of vitamin D, "the sunshine vitamin," which is not otherwise
found under cars at night. Health benefits aside, its main purpose is
to consume 60-watt light bulbs at about the same rate that 105-mm
howitzer shells might be used during, say, the first few hours of the
Battle of the Bulge. More often dark than light, its name is somewhat
misleading.

PHILLIPS SCREWDRIVER: normally used to stab the lids of old-style
paper-and-tin oil cans and splash oil on your shirt; but can also be
used, as the name implies, to strip out Phillips screw heads.

CHEATER PIPE: A cheap tool used for breaking expensive tools

PLUG GAPPING TOOL: For cracking ceramic insulators on pregapped plugs.

GASKET SCRAPER: For ruining cast aluminum sealing surfaces

LUG WRENCH: My personal favorite for removing excess skin off my knuckles

CARBURETOR CLEANER: Best skin drying agent known. When in a pressurised
canister it can be ignited and effectively used to incinerate biting insects and neighbors' pesky pets.

PAINT STRIPPER: Removes it all. Paint, bondo, skin, fingernails, etc. When used in enclosed spaces, renders the user senseless and high as a kite within 2-3 hours.

AIR COMPRESSOR: a machine that takes energy produced in a coal-burning
power plant 200 miles away and transforms it into compressed air that
travels by hose to a Pneumatic impact wrench that grips rusty bolts
last overtightened 58 years ago by someone, and neatly rounds off
their heads.

PRY BAR: a tool used to crumple the metal surrounding that clip or
bracket you needed to remove in order to replace a 50p part.

HOSE CUTTER: a tool used to cut hoses too short.

HAMMER: originally employed as a weapon of war, the hammer nowadays is
used as a kind of divining rod to locate the most expensive parts not
far from the object we are trying to hit.

MECHANIC'S KNIFE: used to open and slice through the contents of
cardboard cartons delivered to your front door; works particularly well
on contents such as seats, vinyl records, liquids in plastic bottles,
collector magazines and rubber or plastic parts.

F**KIT TOOL: any handy tool that you grab and throw across the garage
while yelling "F**K IT" at the top of your lungs. It is also invariably the next
tool that you will need.

GREASE GUN: a device used unsuccessfully to force grease into rusty,
plugged up grease fittings. When not in use this device meters a steady
drip of oil onto the surface beneath it and mysteriously weeps a coat
of grease onto its outer surface, no matter how thoroughly it was
cleaned before it was put away.

SNAP RING PLIERS: a tool typically used to remove or install circular
clips from shafts and bores and launch them across the shop or into a
gravel driveway.

CHANNEL LOCK PLIERS: a tool whose primary purpose is to create large
painful blood blisters on the palms of your hands while simultaneously
rounding the heads off of bolts. Secondary use: See F**KIT TOOL.

WELDING HELMET: a cleverly designed device which allows molten metal
beads to accumulate on one's face and glasses.

ADJUSTABLE SPANNER: a dual purpose device used to rounding off bolts
AND mashing knuckles simultaneously.

MICROMETER: see C-clamp.

LARGE SOCKET WRENCH: see hammer.

MULTIMETER: storage holder for dead batteries.

FIRE EXTINGUISHER: (Normally a brightly coloured ornament), The "never
works when you need it tool", especially when welder or ignited carburetor cleaner has set fire to your 99% finished project.... see Oxy-Acetylene welder, Mig welder, Blow lamp, Zippo

And for the woodworkers:

SKIL SAW: A portable cutting tool used to make wooden studs too short.

BELT SANDER: An electric sanding tool commonly used to convert minor touch-up jobs into major refinishing jobs.

TABLE SAW: A large stationary power tool commonly used to launch wood projectiles for testing wall integrity.

'99 550, Rosso Corsa / Nero, S/N:114654, Assy: 31836, Engine: 52084

High mileage, low compression, and missing on a few cylinders.....just like my cars.

Maranello Skunkworks Team Member
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post #12 of 41 Old 12-19-2010, 06:07 AM
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LOL!

Very funny John. i can relate to some of those.
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post #13 of 41 Old 12-19-2010, 09:28 AM
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You dont need a Snap-On tool cabinet, a Harbor Frieght one can work just as well, saving you $$$$$$ for more tools.

You dont need Snap-On tools, but thier combination wrenches and ratchets are priceless. Their screwdrivers arent bad either.

When I was young and starting out, I bought all Craftsman tools. The wrenches are clunky compared to anything else, but they are strong. I used to like Craftsman ratchets, but the last ten years the quality took a nose dive. Instead of lasting for years and many engine changes, the last ones couldnt survive through even a single engine change. I have come to the opinion that the cheapest ratchet sold at Wal-Mart and made in China is better, and in disgust, threw my last three Craftsmen ratchets in the garbage. As the ramaining sockets fail, I am slowly replacing them with higher quality.

Pawn shops, flea markets, craigslist, and ebay, are all good sources for finding high quality tools at bargain prices. MAC, MATCO, Snap-On, are all very high quality with solid warrantees. But when you have tools that good, failure is so rare the warrantee is almost useless. I have a set of Snap-On wrenches my Dad bought in 1942. They are as good today as the day they were made, and as good as a brand new set. i cannot say the same about the few remaining Craftsman wrenches I bought in 1977. You do get what you pay for sometimes.
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post #14 of 41 Old 01-10-2011, 03:10 PM Thread Starter
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Does anyone have ODBII equipment for reading codes on the newer cars?

Also, what socket sets are the crowd favorite here?
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post #15 of 41 Old 01-10-2011, 08:11 PM
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I recently purchased this OBDII reader and the software to go with it. The WiFi option works a treat as I can keep the laptop on my workbench while the reader is connected to the diagnostic port (no need for a 20-30 ft cable). It reads the Ferrari DME's fine (M5.2 in my 550's case), but I have to refer to the Ferrari table of OBDII codes to get an interpretation. It seems to be a good, high end package for the home mechanic. It's not a Snap-On Scantool by any means, and certainly nowhere near an SD-2.




This is the diagnostic screen, only with the Ferrari ECU's, it gives the DTC reference, but no description.



Here's a realtime graphic display of some OBDII parameters. I must admit I haven't found this particular screen, as I've only played with the software for an hour or so:


'99 550, Rosso Corsa / Nero, S/N:114654, Assy: 31836, Engine: 52084

High mileage, low compression, and missing on a few cylinders.....just like my cars.

Maranello Skunkworks Team Member
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post #16 of 41 Old 01-10-2011, 11:45 PM Thread Starter
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What's the manufacture of that WiFi reader? Do you have a link to their page. This is something I would be interested in buying, great find.
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post #17 of 41 Old 01-11-2011, 05:42 AM
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Andrew, here's the homepage: ScanTool.net LLC - Scan Tools, PC, iPhone, & Android based OBD-II (OBD2) Interfaces, OBD diagnostic software

The WiFi OBDII reader: ScanTool.net LLC - OBDLink WiFi Scan Tool / Interface / Adapter - ScanTool.net

They also offer the reader with Bluetooth instead of WiFi in case you prefer to use an external app for your Android phone as an OBDII interface: ScanTool.net LLC - OBDLink Scan Tool/OBD Interface - ScanTool.net

And the software: ScanTool.net LLC - ScanXL Professional - OBD Software - ScanTool.net

I was hoping the WiFi reader would show up as an access point in my wireless networks at home, so that I could connect to it from multiple PC's (for example, my home office PC with the 26" screen), but that didn't seem to be the case. It may be possible, but unfortunately I only had about an hour to play with the package before having to leave on a month long trip out of the country.

For wrenches & sockets, I've been purchasing the Craftsman Professional line for the last 10 years. As Art mentioned, the quality of "normal" Craftsman tools has dropped, but their "Pro" line seem very good, are fully polished, and have a very nice heft and feel. I actually prefer their feel over the Snap-On's in my tool cabinet.

'99 550, Rosso Corsa / Nero, S/N:114654, Assy: 31836, Engine: 52084

High mileage, low compression, and missing on a few cylinders.....just like my cars.

Maranello Skunkworks Team Member
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post #18 of 41 Old 01-11-2011, 10:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrew View Post
Does anyone have ODBII equipment for reading codes on the newer cars?

Also, what socket sets are the crowd favorite here?
I have the Actron CP9190. You just want to make sure you get one that does more than just read codes. The ones you want will allow you to read and graph live data. You can get something decent for $150 but you will pay more if you want to read airbag, ABS and automatic transmission codes.

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post #19 of 41 Old 01-13-2011, 10:56 PM
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My home tool box
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post #20 of 41 Old 01-14-2011, 04:26 PM Thread Starter
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You'll have no problems taking a car apart with that set.
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