Future Collectibles - Ferrari Life
 3Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 44 Old 04-12-2016, 10:49 AM Thread Starter
Owner
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Nashville, TN
Ferrari Life Posts: 73
Future Collectibles

The following is an article published by well respected Ferrari broker Mike Sheehan. Do you guys agree with his conclusion that 550's and 599's are the future collectible models? I agree with the 550, but the fewer 575's were produced and represent the best iteration of the 550.


Vafa



The Baby-Boomers, now in their 60s, are moving on
The Collectable Ferrari market, like any commodities market, shifts with global socio-economics, demographics and time. Our long term clients are baby-boomers, born in the late 1940s, 50s and early 60s. Once in high school and then college in the late 60s, 70s and early 80s, their bedrooms and dorm rooms were adorned with road tests from Road & Track and Car and Driver featuring the then-new and state-of-the-art 275 GTB and GTS, followed by the 330 GTCs and 330 GTS, the Dinos and Daytonas and on to the Berlinetta Boxers.
In October 1974 the world suffered through the first Arab oil embargo as gas prices rocketed from an affordable 30 cents a gallon to a then-shocking $1 a gallon in only months. The market for exotic cars imploded with near-new Dinos available for $5k - $7.5k and Daytonas at $15k. By 1977 the economy recovered, a few hardworking baby boomers did well and thanks to low prices and a booming global economy the collectable Ferrari market was born. We have been selling to that same world-wide demographic group of buyers since the early 1970s and still sell the same cars to many of the same demographic group today.
Getting resigned to senior discounts
We are now going through a major generational shift. Many of the people my age, the baby-boomers, are now in their 60s and most have "been there, done that" and are now leaving the collectable market. Most of those who wanted to own an Enzo-era Ferrari have owned one, or many, or conversely financially never-could own one. Additionally when one gets senior discounts one's priorities turns to business succession, retirement, insurance and health issues, 401ks, social security, kids, grandkids and Mediterranean cruises. Ferraris fall far down the list of priorities. The Baby-boomers are moving on.

550 Barchetta Poster
The main demographic buying group has always been men in their forties and fifties. Today those in that age group were born in the late 1960s and the 1970s, went to high school and college in the 1980s to early 2000s and so their poster cars were Testarossas, 288 GTOs, F40s, F50s, Enzos, and the 550s and 575s. At the top of that food chain, the 288s, the F40s, the F50s and the Enzos have doubled and doubled again since 2011. Low mileage 288s are now trading in the $2.5m range, high serial number F40s in the $1.4m range, F50s in the $2.m plus range and Enzos now in the $2.5m plus range, each an integral part of what is now needed for the new wave of collector to complete "The Supercar Set".
The last to the price-party
The tide does not raise all ships equally or at the same time. The much-higher-production volume 308s, 328s, Testarossas and 550s were the last Ferraris to the current price party and doubled from 2014 to 2015. As the last of the all-6-speed V-12 Ferraris, the 550s doubled to the $150k range. While the 575 F1s are not considered collectable and have flat lined at the $100k mark, the few 575 6-speeds have doubled and doubled again from $100k to as much as $400k, demonstration that collectability is usually inversely proportional to quantity.
Another clear sign of the demographic shift is that "collector car" is no longer synonymous with "old car". A select few near new supercars, the 599 SA Apertas, the 599 GTB 6-speeds and LaFerraris have doubled in the last few years. 599 Apertas have jumped from a list price in the $600k range to $1.2m and more today. The 599 GTB 6-speeds have jumped from a list price of $350k "ish" to $500k and the LaFerraris have jumped from a list price of $1.8m to $2.5m and more.

599 GTB 6-Speed
Collectability versus quantity
Meanwhile, back in the world of Enzo-era cars, the best of the best, the most desirable, the Coach built cars, the 250 TDFs; 250 SWBs, the California Spyders and 250 GTOs will always occupy the top of the Ferrari food chain. Sold new to movie stars, heads of state and captains of industry, the sleek and uncompromised lines of the 250s and the Coach built cars were penciled long before smog and crash safety standards, ABS brakes, traction control or engine management systems were on the horizon. Additionally the 250s offer a unique auditory and visceral driving experience un-paralleled by today's modern Ferraris.

250 SWB California Spyder s/n 2871 GT at Amelia Island - Gooding & Company
The Enzo-era Ferraris have always enjoyed a global market, are relatively liquid, can be on an airplane for any part of the globe on short notice, have long been a pride-of-ownership asset, were built in very low numbers by today's standards and Ferrari isn't making any more. Witness the sale of 400 SA s/n 3949 SA for $4.4M or the sale of 250 SWB California Spyder s/n 2871 GT for $17m at Amelia Island last month, both sold to an English Diamond billionaire, again demonstrating that collectability is inversely proportional to quantity.
The market shifts
Further down the Enzo-era food chain, the higher-production-number 275 GTBs and GTS; the 330 GTC and GTS, Dinos and Daytonas, the Gold Standard of user-friendly and collectable Ferraris for the last four decades, find fewer clients and so prices are "off" substantially. Baby boomers have stopped buying old cars or restoration projects that might take a sizeable amount of their time left on this planet. Further driving down the old-Ferrari market, many of today's younger 40 and 50 year old buyers don't want and don't care about cars built before they were on the planet.
Adding to the global demographic downturn, in the last two years the Euro has dropped from 1.35 "ish" €uro to 1.12 "ish" €uro to the dollar. The Cdn dollar which was 94 cents "ish" to the USD has dropped to .76 "ish" cents to the US dollar. The Aussi dollar has dropped from 93 "ish" cents to the USD to .76 "ish" cents. The British £££ has gone from 1.53 £ to 1.41 £, a more modest drop, but… as Ferraris are almost always priced in USD, the Brits, the Aussis, Europeans and Canadians, who collectively made up over 50% of the buying market, have left the ever-higher Enzo-Era Ferrari price party.
Further adding to the softening market, global worries about a downturn in the Chinese real estate market, stock market and industry sector; combined with a frothy US Stock market; fear of an Italian banking system collapse; the threat of a Brexit and well-founded worries about the ability of global Central bankers to sustain the tepid economic expansion have all contributed to a softer market for the globally traded Enzo-era Ferraris.
Newer, faster, safer
Each new generation of cars is much faster, safer, and far more user-friendly. Today's sports car will blow the doors off the last generation's similar model, let alone a car decades older. What is nostalgic and desireable to one generation is merely old fashioned or obsolete to the next. A 246 GT may be a beautiful and thrilling car to own and drive, a 250 Lusso may be a timeless design, but neither are much fun to drive for any extended period and are dead slow by any modern standard.

Daytona
Daytonas have long been used as the leading market price indicator of the higher-volume Enzo-era Ferraris. While it would be difficult to perform an analytical study, I would guess that the average cost basis among Daytona coupe owners is probably in the $250-350K range. So what if they are not worth last year's $850K, but rather today's $650K? The average owner still has a substantial profit with a free 599 thrown in on the deal.
The next generation of collectables
The younger generation doesn't want to live their father's dreams, instead they want the newest and the best. Only a decade ago I would never have guessed the 550s and 599s would become the next affordable collectables, but with only 3,600 550s and another 3,600 599s made, and only 974 US (and Canadian) 550s and 1,082 US (and Canadian) 599s built, they are the future. Today's middle-age buyer's dream cars start where the previous generation's left off. No one wants to date their dad's prom queen! While we will always sell Dinos, Daytonas and all the other Enzo-era Ferraris, today we sell far more 550s and 599s than Dinos. The market is a changing.
Vmansouri is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 44 Old 04-12-2016, 11:22 AM
 
efg2014's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Ferrari Life Posts: 329
The young people now days don't get driver's licenses. Companies like Ford and GM are worried that the lack of interest from Generation X will cut into profits. So.... will the market for high-end sports car get bigger or smaller? This guys article is looking backward in time and making a prediction which may or may not be right.

2006 Ferrari F430 Coupé,
efg2014 is offline  
post #3 of 44 Old 04-13-2016, 01:56 AM
Owner
 
550_Maranello's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Cesena - Italy
Ferrari Life Posts: 1,233
[QUOTE=Vmansouri;689217]The following is an article published by well respected Ferrari broker Mike Sheehan. Do you guys agree with his conclusion that 550's and 599's are the future collectible models? I agree with the 550, but the fewer 575's were produced and represent the best iteration of the 550.


Vafa


Vafa,
how are you? and your HGTC? I not read you from more time ...

About artile i think this is the personal opinion of this broker, bu tbroker have not the crystal sphere .. they run follow to the gain and stop, other is nothing for them....
Why brokers don't tell this 5 years ago, when nobody wanted the 550 or the 575??
For me his are words to the wind ...
I agree with you that 575 represent the best evolution of the 550, lik ethe 512M in the testarossa world ...

Best Regards From Italy

Fabio

PRESENT: 575 F1 HGTC ROSSO CORSA 2004' - MB CLS 350 CGI 2007'
PAST: 550 ROSSO CORSA 1998' - MB CLK 240 2002'
550_Maranello is offline  
 
post #4 of 44 Old 04-13-2016, 07:48 AM
Owner
Elite Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Ferrari Life Posts: 3,137
Quote:
Originally Posted by 550_Maranello View Post
Why brokers don't tell this 5 years ago, when nobody wanted the 550 or the 575??
For me his are words to the wind ...
Fabio,

Five years ago, the last of the new generation were just leaving college.
I'm not sure anyone could have predicted their future connection to cars at that time. In the US, we were also still struggling with the economy crash, and the 550 had hit the bottom of its depreciation curve.

I think Sheehan's basic premise is sound, that the 550 will be sought after. (I hesitate to use the term "collectible", as it has many connotations.)

No idea how the 575 will compare relative to the 550 in general, but I think Sheehan was referring to only the manual cars, not F1s.

Of all the narcissists I know, I love me the most.
Killer58 is online now  
post #5 of 44 Old 04-13-2016, 02:55 PM Thread Starter
Owner
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Nashville, TN
Ferrari Life Posts: 73
Good points!
Vmansouri is offline  
post #6 of 44 Old 04-14-2016, 07:24 AM
 
good2go's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Ferrari Life Posts: 21
Some people do not look at a car as an investment. Some people just want to drive the car. I bought a California T 2015 because I wanted the newer technology, new engine design... and I want a design I could drive. I had a dealer say, you don't want to put a lot of miles on it, because it will greatly decrease the value. I responded, I bought the car to drive, I'm going to drive the heck out of it.

While you can purchase a car as an investment, or you can purchase a car to drive. I personally want to drive my Ferrari not look at it and hope it goes up in value.
DogZy likes this.
good2go is offline  
post #7 of 44 Old 04-14-2016, 08:39 AM
 
efg2014's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Ferrari Life Posts: 329
Three types of owners

Quote:
Originally Posted by good2go View Post
Some people do not look at a car as an investment. Some people just want to drive the car. I bought a California T 2015 because I wanted the newer technology, new engine design... and I want a design I could drive. I had a dealer say, you don't want to put a lot of miles on it, because it will greatly decrease the value. I responded, I bought the car to drive, I'm going to drive the heck out of it.

While you can purchase a car as an investment, or you can purchase a car to drive. I personally want to drive my Ferrari not look at it and hope it goes up in value.
I'd say there are 3 types of owners.

1) Love the car and want to drive it all they can. Like the kid in the candy store, eat as much as you want as you have the chance.
2) Love the car but want to drive it sparingly.
3) Don't love the car, simply see it as an investment that needs to be protected.

2006 Ferrari F430 Coupé,
efg2014 is offline  
post #8 of 44 Old 04-15-2016, 04:12 AM
Owner
 
Bluebottle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Exeter, England
Ferrari Life Posts: 1,407
I think that one can have one's cake and eat it!

I bought my 550 three years back because I wanted to own / drive a V12 Ferrari before I meet my maker (hopefully a long way off, but who knows what is around the next corner?). I also thought that it was a car on which I would not lose money: this was an important consideration, but not the primary driving force in my decision. To my surprise, it is now worth about three times what I paid for it! So the way I look at it is that if I drive it a lot, I enjoy myself a lot, but when I am not driving it, it is making me money, which is some consolation for not driving it all the time. Either way, I am a winner.

The 550 experience has been my justification for buying the Dino Dino 6934. I bought it because I have wanted a Dino for a very long time: it is the first Ferrari I drove (way back when they were new cars) and I just love everything about it. I haven't bought it as an investment, but my belief that it will at least hold its value, and probably continue to appreciate, was my justification for buying the car I wanted to own.

In answer to the original question, yes, I believe that 550s and 575s will continue to appreciate in value, in the following order: 575 manuals the most (v. rare), 550 (all manuals, less rare) and 575 F1s the least. I hope that Mr. Sheehan is not right about Daytonas and Dinos having had their day, especially Dinos! But if he is, I shall still have the pleasure of owning and driving it and life is too short to worry too much about the money side of things - there are no pockets in a shroud!

Best wishes, John
Ferrari: 550 Maranello S/N 110995, Dino 246 GT S/N 6934
Other: 1990 Bentley Turbo R, 1989 Porsche 911 C2, 2004 Mercedes 500CLK, 2011 Mercedes E350 CDI, 1972 VW T2 Camper, 2014 Fiat 500C, 1963 Jaguar E-type 3.8 FHC (in restoration), 2015 Maserati Granturismo Sport
Website: http://bluebottleonline.com/
Bluebottle is offline  
post #9 of 44 Old 04-15-2016, 08:14 AM
 
efg2014's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Ferrari Life Posts: 329
John,
You would be in category one with additional icing on the cake. I saw a silver 550 a few weeks back when I took my F430 on the road and it was beautiful! I pulled up to the car and we both turned our heads towards each other smiled and I gave him the thumbs up. Next I got in front to get a good view for a about 30 seconds and took off.

2006 Ferrari F430 Coupé,
efg2014 is offline  
post #10 of 44 Old 04-15-2016, 08:18 AM
Owner
 
silly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: SoCal
Ferrari Life Posts: 269
Quote:
Originally Posted by efg2014 View Post
The young people now days don't get driver's licenses. Companies like Ford and GM are worried that the lack of interest from Generation X will cut into profits. So.... will the market for high-end sports car get bigger or smaller? This guys article is looking backward in time and making a prediction which may or may not be right.
You pretty much nailed it.

I been involved in some think tanks about this very subject with some OEM's
They are trying to see where and if there will be a personal car market in 10-20 years.
Youths in the city areas have no interest in getting a license, call ride sharing. They expect this market to be gone.


Pretty much anything with a stick shift that runs on gas may be a collector car.


The past formula that worked for 40 years is thrown out the window now. I disagree with his article.

Disclosure, I have been collecting seriously since the early 80's and used this formula.

94 F348 Challenge
95 F355 Challenge x 2
97 F355 Spider
silly is offline  
post #11 of 44 Old 04-15-2016, 09:38 AM
Owner
 
Bluebottle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Exeter, England
Ferrari Life Posts: 1,407
Quote:
Originally Posted by efg2014 View Post
John,
You would be in category one with additional icing on the cake. I saw a silver 550 a few weeks back when I took my F430 on the road and it was beautiful! I pulled up to the car and we both turned our heads towards each other smiled and I gave him the thumbs up. Next I got in front to get a good view for a about 30 seconds and took off.
You V8 boys, always in a hurry! We V12 men take things easy, confident in knowing that we have a full set of cylinders!!

Best wishes, John
Ferrari: 550 Maranello S/N 110995, Dino 246 GT S/N 6934
Other: 1990 Bentley Turbo R, 1989 Porsche 911 C2, 2004 Mercedes 500CLK, 2011 Mercedes E350 CDI, 1972 VW T2 Camper, 2014 Fiat 500C, 1963 Jaguar E-type 3.8 FHC (in restoration), 2015 Maserati Granturismo Sport
Website: http://bluebottleonline.com/
Bluebottle is offline  
post #12 of 44 Old 04-15-2016, 12:47 PM
 
efg2014's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Ferrari Life Posts: 329
hmm

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluebottle View Post
You V8 boys, always in a hurry! We V12 men take things easy, confident in knowing that we have a full set of cylinders!!
yup, Member of your tribe seemed quite relaxed and was cruising at about 80.

2006 Ferrari F430 Coupé,
efg2014 is offline  
post #13 of 44 Old 04-27-2016, 09:44 AM
Owner
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Toronto
Ferrari Life Posts: 497
[quote=550_Maranello;689289]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vmansouri View Post
The following is an article published by well respected Ferrari broker Mike Sheehan. Do you guys agree with his conclusion that 550's and 599's are the future collectible models? I agree with the 550, but the fewer 575's were produced and represent the best iteration of the 550.


Vafa


Vafa,
how are you? and your HGTC? I not read you from more time ...

About artile i think this is the personal opinion of this broker, bu tbroker have not the crystal sphere .. they run follow to the gain and stop, other is nothing for them....
Why brokers don't tell this 5 years ago, when nobody wanted the 550 or the 575??
For me his are words to the wind ...
I agree with you that 575 represent the best evolution of the 550, lik ethe 512M in the testarossa world ...

Best Regards From Italy
I am not sure I agree with Mike Sheehan's post completely. True he is an expert and a collector, and I am sure there is much truth to what he says, but still he is trying to predict the future and I think its quite impossible to predict the future for anyone regardless of their expertise. Perhaps looking forward to the next few years what he says may hold true, but if we look forward 10 or 20 years that may not be the case at all. Its anyone's guess. As for the fact that he says the 575 F1 is not collectible I would like to think he is wrong considering that:
1. The 575 F1 was the first regular production front engine Ferrari V12 offered with the F1 transmission
2. It was an upgrade and improvement overall over the 550 and was also produced in smaller #'s, which itself is usually an indication of future value.
This is just my humble opinion
Clyde
tifosi_ is online now  
post #14 of 44 Old 04-27-2016, 10:02 AM
Owner
 
Bluebottle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Exeter, England
Ferrari Life Posts: 1,407
Anyone might think you own a 575 F1, Clyde

Seriously, you might be on to something here. While a lot of people today prize a manual gearbox in a classic Ferrari and prices reflect this, who is to say that, in 10+ years' time, buyers might be so used to driving automatics / paddle-controlled gearboxes, that they won't want the complication of a manual gearbox in their classics? 575 F1s might then command a premium over 550s / manual 575s.

Best wishes, John
Ferrari: 550 Maranello S/N 110995, Dino 246 GT S/N 6934
Other: 1990 Bentley Turbo R, 1989 Porsche 911 C2, 2004 Mercedes 500CLK, 2011 Mercedes E350 CDI, 1972 VW T2 Camper, 2014 Fiat 500C, 1963 Jaguar E-type 3.8 FHC (in restoration), 2015 Maserati Granturismo Sport
Website: http://bluebottleonline.com/
Bluebottle is offline  
post #15 of 44 Old 04-27-2016, 10:10 AM
Owner
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Toronto
Ferrari Life Posts: 497
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluebottle View Post
Anyone might think you own a 575 F1, Clyde

Seriously, you might be on to something here. While a lot of people today prize a manual gearbox in a classic Ferrari and prices reflect this, who is to say that, in 10+ years' time, buyers might be so used to driving automatics / paddle-controlled gearboxes, that they won't want the complication of a manual gearbox in their classics? 575 F1s might then command a premium over 550s / manual 575s.
I guess I'm pretty transparent, aren't I?
Well, I think there will always be a demand for manual gearbox's for future serious collectors, though whether they will be in demand for the average exotic or sports car buyer/investor is another matter. In a recent discussion with my dealer they told me that most young buyers today prefer the F1 transmission over a manual because of its convenience in all driving conditions (particularly in traffic I suppose), especially since they are so good now. They are certainly much more advanced than my single clutch 575s F1, as are Ferraris as a whole what with the advancements in the e-dif and side slip control (neither of which were developed at the time of the 550/575).
Clyde
tifosi_ is online now  
post #16 of 44 Old 04-28-2016, 05:26 AM
Owner
 
intrepid's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Saratoga Springs NY
Ferrari Life Posts: 905
Garage
[quote=tifosi_;690857]
Quote:
Originally Posted by 550_Maranello View Post

I am not sure I agree with Mike Sheehan's post completely. True he is an expert and a collector, and I am sure there is much truth to what he says, but still he is trying to predict the future and I think its quite impossible to predict the future for anyone regardless of their expertise. Perhaps looking forward to the next few years what he says may hold true, but if we look forward 10 or 20 years that may not be the case at all. Its anyone's guess. As for the fact that he says the 575 F1 is not collectible I would like to think he is wrong considering that:
1. The 575 F1 was the first regular production front engine Ferrari V12 offered with the F1 transmission
2. It was an upgrade and improvement overall over the 550 and was also produced in smaller #'s, which itself is usually an indication of future value.
This is just my humble opinion
Clyde
Clyde, I've known Mike personally for more than twenty years. He is very knowledgeable but he is principally a dealer, not a collector. When he is a collector, it will be because he is in a position to cherry-pick a particular car he would like to own. Nothing in the world wrong with that, it's simply a fact. But being at heart a dealer, when he has an offer of a ton of money for that car, it is gone. So we must bear in mind that his predictions come with the caveat that he has a personal investment in the correctness of his predictions which are loaded with his dependence, as a dealer, on "the market".

As to 3-pedal cars, they are surely collectible now but IMHO it is very likely that over time the market for 3-pedal cars is going to shrink. Fewer and fewer driver/owners are capable of driving them and concomitantly the number of buyers who have an interest in nothing more than possessing them and are willing to put up big bucks to look at them, admire them and truck them to Concours will likewise shrink.

just my 2c

Seth
575M F1, Maserati Spyder, Cadillac STS-V & CTS
past: 330/365GTC speciale, F355b, 412GT, 400iA, 308GT4 2+2, 330GT 2+2, Porsche 356b Super 90, BMW 1800ti

what do I know? I drive blue Ferraris

Last edited by intrepid; 04-28-2016 at 06:11 AM.
intrepid is offline  
post #17 of 44 Old 04-28-2016, 05:53 AM
Owner
 
550_Maranello's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Cesena - Italy
Ferrari Life Posts: 1,233
[quote=intrepid;691049]
Quote:
Originally Posted by tifosi_ View Post

Clyde, I've known Mike personally for more than twenty years. He is very knowledgeable but he is principally a dealer, not a collector. When he is a collector, it will be because he is in a position to cherry-pick a particular car he would like to own. Nothing in the world wrong with that, it's simply a fact. But being at heart a dealer, when he has an offer for a ton of money for that car, it is gone. So we must bear in mind that his predictions come with the caveat that he has a personal investment in the correctness of his predictions which are loaded with his dependence, as a dealer, on "the market".

As to 3-pedal cars, they are surely collectible now but IMHO it is very likely that over time the market for 3-pedal cars is going to shrink. Fewer and fewer driver/owners are capable of driving them and concomitantly the number of buyers who have an interest in nothing more than possessing them and are willing to put up big bucks to look at them, admire them and truck them to Concours will likewise shrink.

just my 2c
I agree .....

Fabio

PRESENT: 575 F1 HGTC ROSSO CORSA 2004' - MB CLS 350 CGI 2007'
PAST: 550 ROSSO CORSA 1998' - MB CLK 240 2002'
550_Maranello is offline  
post #18 of 44 Old 04-28-2016, 07:01 AM
Owner
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Toronto
Ferrari Life Posts: 497
[quote=intrepid;691049]
Quote:
Originally Posted by tifosi_ View Post

Clyde, I've known Mike personally for more than twenty years. He is very knowledgeable but he is principally a dealer, not a collector. When he is a collector, it will be because he is in a position to cherry-pick a particular car he would like to own. Nothing in the world wrong with that, it's simply a fact. But being at heart a dealer, when he has an offer of a ton of money for that car, it is gone. So we must bear in mind that his predictions come with the caveat that he has a personal investment in the correctness of his predictions which are loaded with his dependence, as a dealer, on "the market".

As to 3-pedal cars, they are surely collectible now but IMHO it is very likely that over time the market for 3-pedal cars is going to shrink. Fewer and fewer driver/owners are capable of driving them and concomitantly the number of buyers who have an interest in nothing more than possessing them and are willing to put up big bucks to look at them, admire them and truck them to Concours will likewise shrink.

just my 2c
Seth thanks for clarifying that for me. I thought that Mike was both a dealer as well as a collector. I actually almost listed my car with him last year but when I asked him how much he expected to fetch for it sight unseen I felt that his estimate was far too low, particularly considering what I saw 575s selling for on the open market (Autotrader). So I believe what you are saying is true.
Perhaps you are also correct about 3 pedal cars long term, however, I expect they will still be quite popular for a long time to come as not only are people of our generation fond of them, but they are presently being glorified in the car magazines when they are available (and when they are not). The UK magazines as well as people like Chris Harris always seem to laud 3 pedals even when I feel they would not be either an advantage or add enjoyment to a particular car. Witness Porsche's upcoming 911R as an example, which I feel is more of a marketing ploy. I mean after all, will it really offer any better feel than a GT3 or GT3 RS?
Time will tell
Clyde
tifosi_ is online now  
post #19 of 44 Old 04-28-2016, 11:55 AM
Owner
 
Bluebottle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Exeter, England
Ferrari Life Posts: 1,407
Quote:
Originally Posted by tifosi_ View Post


Perhaps you are also correct about 3 pedal cars long term, however, I expect they will still be quite popular for a long time to come as not only are people of our generation fond of them, but they are presently being glorified in the car magazines when they are available (and when they are not). The UK magazines as well as people like Chris Harris always seem to laud 3 pedals even when I feel they would not be either an advantage or add enjoyment to a particular car. Witness Porsche's upcoming 911R as an example, which I feel is more of a marketing ploy. I mean after all, will it really offer any better feel than a GT3 or GT3 RS?
Time will tell
Clyde
Having just returned from a 150 mile round trip in my 911, I am in no doubt that the 3-pedal option adds greatly to the enjoyment, but I am equally certain that the two pedal option on today's cars is far more effective when it comes to out and out performance (with the added advantage that when you hit a jam, you can relax and let it do the work).

Best wishes, John
Ferrari: 550 Maranello S/N 110995, Dino 246 GT S/N 6934
Other: 1990 Bentley Turbo R, 1989 Porsche 911 C2, 2004 Mercedes 500CLK, 2011 Mercedes E350 CDI, 1972 VW T2 Camper, 2014 Fiat 500C, 1963 Jaguar E-type 3.8 FHC (in restoration), 2015 Maserati Granturismo Sport
Website: http://bluebottleonline.com/
Bluebottle is offline  
post #20 of 44 Old 04-28-2016, 11:58 AM
Owner
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Toronto
Ferrari Life Posts: 497
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluebottle View Post
Having just returned from a 150 mile round trip in my 911, I am in no doubt that the 3-pedal option adds greatly to the enjoyment, but I am equally certain that the two pedal option on today's cars is far more effective when it comes to out and out performance (with the added advantage that when you hit a jam, you can relax and let it do the work).
For those of us who have either had or have 3 pedals I would think that most of us would agree that a 3 pedal adds to the enjoyment, but for others, which are becoming a much larger group at this stage, they may not feel the same way.
tifosi_ is online now  
Reply

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome
Copyright 2012 ONE Media, Inc.
FerrariLife is independently run with no affiliation with Ferrari SpA
Ferrari for Sale | Maserati for Sale