575M and Superamerica Technical Thread - Ferrari Life
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post #1 of 885 Old 08-15-2011, 04:54 PM Thread Starter
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575M and Superamerica Technical Thread

For those considering a 575M, thought you might be interested in when upgrades were made on the 575M and whether a car you are considering will have them or not.

If you did not know it already, Ferraris since the early 70s have been assigned a Serial Number and an Assembly Number. The Serial Number (last six of VIN now) is assigned when a car is ordered. The Assembly Number is assigned based on the order in which the car shows up on the assembly line. If a car has a delayed production start due to shortages of parts, special paint, etc, it is possible for it to have an early SN and a much later AN.

So why should anyone care about ANs? The main reason is that upgrades were done on the assembly line and were initiated at a specific AN. If you look in the parts catalogs, you will note parts that were fitted up until AN XXXXX and new parts that were fitted at AN XXXXX+1. Some part upgrades will be noted by both AN and SN, but it is entirely possible to have a later SN than the one noted and not have the new part fitted because that Ferrari had an earlier AN.

So now that we have pedantically bored you to tears, here is the list of upgrades for the 575M at the appropriate AN (and sometimes Engine Number and even Transmisson Number). Also included is a list of 575Ms and Superamericas by SN, AN, shifter type, geographic area of origin, and equipment level (FHP or HGTC).

Later I will post what is included in the Fiorano Handling Package (FHP) and the Handling Grand Turismo Competizione (HGTC) package.

Taz
Terry Phillips
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File Type: doc 575M 575 SA Updates Rev 1.6.doc (43.5 KB, 894 views)
File Type: doc 575M 575 SA VIN and Assembly Numbers Rev 1.78.doc (230.0 KB, 747 views)
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post #2 of 885 Old 08-15-2011, 05:18 PM
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Holy cow! What is this, your third day posting here?!

Will you please run for President?
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post #3 of 885 Old 08-15-2011, 05:23 PM
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Taz

What about the 550 - any upgrades for the Barchetta?
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post #4 of 885 Old 08-15-2011, 05:52 PM Thread Starter
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Doug- Since I have a 575, I have never tracked changes on other models except to answer specific questions, like John Cribbs' on the 550 cooling system down below.

Always thought if I provided a template for other owners, someone might do the same for their car. So far, completely wrong on my part.

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post #5 of 885 Old 08-15-2011, 07:17 PM Thread Starter
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575M Owners' Technical Thread

Thought I would start a thread where I can put technical data to help Maranello owners maintain their cars. Although some of the data will be 575M/Superamerica specific, some will apply to the 550 as well.

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Changing Transaxle Oil in Your Maranello

I use Valvoline 75W-90 full synthetic transmission oil in my 575M, but any good synthetic 75W-90 should work fine. No LSD chatter on mine with the Valvoline. Change interval recommendation is every two years, but some pros recommend it be changed annually, like the engine oil/filter and brake/clutch fluid.

These procedures are from the 575M WSM, and the 550 is pretty much identical.

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post #7 of 885 Old 08-15-2011, 08:15 PM Thread Starter
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Fiorano Handling Package (FHP)

The Fiorano Handling Package (FHP) was introduced on the 550 late in production and included stiffer springs, a 21 mm (vs 17 mm) rear anti-roll bar, a shock absorber ECU with higher rates, a tighter steering ECU, and standard red brake calipers (yellow, aluminum, and black were also
available) with Pagid 4-4 racing pads. The springs provided were both shorter and stiffer than the stock springs, ride height was lowered and handling was improved and ride only slightly degraded.

FHP was available on the 575M from day one of production, unlike what is stated in the automotive press, as was a separate option for 19" modular wheels with appropriate tires. The only difference between 550 FHP and 575M FHP was there was no Mannesmann-Sachs shock absorber ECU like there was a Bilstein ECU include on the 550.

Here is the actual tech bulletin describing FHP. HGTC tomorrow.

Taz
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File Type: pdf 575M Fiorano Package.pdf (211.4 KB, 1228 views)
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post #8 of 885 Old 08-16-2011, 07:20 PM Thread Starter
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Handling Grand Turismo Competizione (HGTC)

In the summer of 2004, Ferrari introduced a much more complete handling and upgrade package than FHP and called it the Handling GTC (HGTC) option. The most obvious components of the package were Brembo CCM brakes, huge, six piston, monobloc calipers acting on 398 x 36 mm ceramic rotors in the front and 4 piston calipers and 360 x 32 mm ceramic rotors in the rear. These were much larger than the 380 mm F, 350 mm R rotors standard on the CS and optionally available on the F430, just being introduced. Enlarged ducting was also part of the package to provide more airflow to the larger brakes in the front.

The HGTC option also included an updated F1 ECU/TCU that sped up shifting from 220 ms minimum to 180 ms and smoothed out normal shifting even more. The package included the 19" modular wheels that had always been optional on the 575M, necessary to provide enough room for the huge brakes. It also included the very sticky, but very fast wearing, Pirelli P Zero Corsa DOT legal competition tires in the same 255/35 19 and 305/30 19 sizes as those fitted on standard 575Ms with the 19" wheels.

The suspension was also upgraded with an HGTC specific shock absorber ECU, springs that were stiffer than stock and longer than the FHP springs, a 19.5 mm rear anti-roll bar (stock 17 mm, FHP 21 mm), and four new shock absorbers. This gave ride and handling characteristics that were a good compromise between the stock and FHP set-ups. Because of the addition of a steering position sensor in late Summer 03, the need for the recalibrated Hydraulic steering ECU was deemed unnecessary. A sport exhaust with double walled tailpipes was also included.

The price of the HGTC option was $20K+, nearly all of that for the brake upgrade. That was quite a bit more than the ~$4K for FHP. Because of the high price, less than 100, perhaps way less, HGTC 575Ms were produced. Combining lists with others interested in such numbers, we have 26 HGTC 575Ms we can identify. More Superamericas by far were fitted with HGTC than 575Ms.

For those owners of earlier 575Ms, Ferrari also offered HGTC upgrade kits. The content varied in the kits, but the price could be as high as EU 28K. The common features were the CCM brakes and ducting and a carbon fiber instrument panel with its 2K chip programmed with the CCM brake specifics. Depending on level of equipment, the kits could include HGTC springs and rear anti-roll bar (not if FHP equipped), the F1 ECU/TCU (not for three pedal cars), 19" wheels, and the HGTC sports exhaust. Very few of these kits were sold and I only have records of one 02 575M that was upgraded.

Enough boring details. here is the actual Ferrari bulletin describing the HGTC option in detail, plus the list of HGTC 575Ms we have identified.

Taz
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File Type: pdf 1265-A-575GTCHandlingPackage.pdf (1.23 MB, 548 views)
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File Type: doc 575M HGTC Serial Numbers.doc (22.5 KB, 363 views)
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post #9 of 885 Old 08-16-2011, 07:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Killer58 View Post
Holy cow! What is this, your third day posting here?!

Will you please run for President?
You have no idea the info and knowledge Taz brings to this forum.
Buckle up and hold on.
Taz will blow you away with info.
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post #10 of 885 Old 08-17-2011, 09:49 AM Thread Starter
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How to Change Oil in Your Maranello

The OM says a Maranello only takes 10 liters (10.57 qts) of oil, but mine takes 12-13 quarts, so make sure you use the gauge/dipstick and do not just dump 10-11 qts in. Of course overfilling is even worse, so y'all be careful now, hear?

I use Valvoline full synthetic 5W-40 in my car after the Shell Helix Ultra I first used foamed badly. At ~$20/liter, changing did not hurt my feelings, and I have not missed the little Cavallino on the container. The Valvoline works great and is widely available, but any good synthetic 5W-40 or 0W-40 will work fine. If you like Mobil 1, use their European formula or whatever they are calling it this week. That goes in Porsches and Mercedes at the factory.

Again, from the 575M WSM, but applicable to the 550 and 456/M, as well.

Please note that Ferrari now recommends using a torque wrench to replace filters after the old hand tight method spelled out in earlier WSMs proved completely inadequate. The pros like Brian Crall strongly recommend this be done for all Ferrari oil filters.

Taz
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Last edited by tazandjan; 08-17-2011 at 09:54 AM.
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post #11 of 885 Old 08-17-2011, 06:25 PM
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Terry, do you want comments in these technical (how to) threads or post related experiences elsewhere?

My 550 shifter was sticking in low gears..sometimes wouldn't go into first without moving car in a higher gear. Gearbox service (Shell) had just been done by a Ferrari dealer. I switched the gear oil to Readline 75W90 NS and, with minor shifter alignment adjustments, the problem went away...smooth as glass now.
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post #12 of 885 Old 08-17-2011, 08:05 PM Thread Starter
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Doug- Of course, all comments and additions are welcome and a great benefit to the thread and forum.

Many Ferrari owners have had good luck with Redline gear oil. Glad that and a linkage adjustment fixed the problem.

900 psi of hydraulic pressure does a pretty good job of shifting mine.

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post #13 of 885 Old 08-18-2011, 01:10 PM Thread Starter
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550 and 575M Production Numbers

Somebody will ask so there were 3083 550s produced, 448 Barchettas, all three pedal cars. For the 575M, there were 2064 produced, with 11.9%, or 246, with three pedals. 559 Superamericas were built, and I have no statistics on how many had three pedals.

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post #14 of 885 Old 08-18-2011, 01:58 PM Thread Starter
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Maranello Fuel Tank Removal

So far, this problem seems to afflict 550 owners more than 575 owners, but here is how to remove the fuel tank if you ever have to do it. One of these days, we need to see if we can adapt the cheap 575M fuel pumps to replace the very expensive and problem-prone 550 fuel pumps.

These procedures come from the 575M technical bulletins, so there may be detail differences in the 550, but the procedures are basically similar.

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post #15 of 885 Old 08-18-2011, 03:56 PM
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Interesting 550 WSR (World Speed Record)

Quote:
Originally Posted by tazandjan View Post
Somebody will ask so there were 3083 550s produced, 448 Barchettas, all three pedal cars. For the 575M, there were 2064 produced, with 11.9%, or 246, with three pedals. 559 Superamericas were built, and I have no statistics on how many had three pedals.

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Terry, I just wanted to add out of curiousity the 33 cars produced in this model of which 10 were Right Hand Drives. I think it has a cool interior. I wonder if anyone has one in North America?

550 World Speed Record
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post #16 of 885 Old 08-18-2011, 04:28 PM Thread Starter
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Domenic- Affirmative. I believe 12 or 13 were brought to the States. They were part of the 3083 550s produced and the package was mainly trim with a standard engine. The real cars had tiny fuel tanks to keep weight down.


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post #17 of 885 Old 08-18-2011, 06:50 PM Thread Starter
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Steering Position Sensor

For those of you looking for a 575M, Assembly Number 52556 was a very important milestone for the 575M. Although the 456, 456M and 550 were all fitted with a steering position sensor, the early 575Ms did not have one. A steering position sensor sends a signal to the shock absorber ECU to stiffen up the outside shock absorbers for improved roll control as the car is entering a turn. This steering position sensor can predict the need to stiffen the shock absorbers much quicker than the accelerometers, which tend to lag.

Ferrari got the message that leaving the steering sensor out was not a good idea, regardless of how improved your accelerometers were, and added the capability to the 575M in the Nov/Dec 2003 timeframe. I can call it that closely because my 575M with Assembly Number 52428 was built in Nov 03 and just missed having the steering sensor. Curses.

To go along with the steering sensor, new wiring harnesses were required front and rear to get the sensor input to the Motronic DME and then to pass it to the shock absorber ECU behind the passenger compartment. This also required a new shock absorber ECU to process the steering sensor input.

Bad news is all these changes were too extensive to be able to retrofit the steering sensor without prohibitive cost. So do not try it.

In my opinion, this steering position sensor was the most important upgrade made to the 575M. If I were buying a car, having it would be worth about $5K to me, but it should not stop anybody from buying an earlier car. Mine is earlier and I love it. About 75% of 575Ms did not have the steering position sensor upgrade.

So now that we have bored you to tears yet again, here is the factory bulletin showing exactly what was included in the steering position sensor update.

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post #18 of 885 Old 08-19-2011, 05:31 AM
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Damn! Nice Thread Taz! Good info on the 246 575s with row your own. Wonder how many of those came with or had added the HGTC package? THAT would be a car to have!

I was told that some owners moving from a 550 to a 575 were not pleased with the porpoiseing of the suspension in the 575 and that is why Ferrari decided to offer a retrofit of the HGTC package.

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It's a simple process...... it's just complicated by human beings....
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post #19 of 885 Old 08-19-2011, 07:05 AM Thread Starter
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JB- If you look up above, you will see that the Fiorano Handling Package was available from day one of production and that package actually had stiffer springs and a larger anti-roll bar than the HGTC package. The main problem with early 575Ms was a Shock Absorber ECU, part number 183960, fitted to RHD and LHD cars, that was a little too loose in pitch and roll. The UK press really complained, although there were no complaints in the US press, and Ferrari updated the ECU with part number 201673 for both RHD and LHD cars, even retrofitting some RHD cars if the owner complained. Later, RHD cars were updated with ECU 197211/201674, which was slightly stiffer than 201673.

I have a whole explanation of the 575M Shock Absorber ECUs I will put into the Owners' 575M Technical Thread.

My car has FHP and came with ECU 201673, but I upgraded to 201674 when I got the ECU at a good price. I then sold 201673 to an Australian friend who had 183960, so the upgrade only cost me about $275. I would not have paid $1000 to upgrade from 201673, but would have if my car had been equipped with 183960. Even early FHP cars were fitted with 183960, but the stiffer springs and rear anti-roll bar pretty much negated any problems the ECU caused.

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post #20 of 885 Old 08-19-2011, 01:55 PM Thread Starter
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How to Repair the 575M A/C Panel Mounting Tabs

I recently attended an FCA NM Chapter luncheon in Santa Fe and had a really great time. As I started for home and reached up to lower the window, however, the top of the entire A/C panel shifted down and out. No problem, I thought, Aaron and John, my techs in Albuquerque, would just tighten up the mounting screws and all would be OK. Wrong. When Aaron removed the two outer switches on either side to access the two mounting screws, all kinds of plastic bits disentigrated and there was no way to tighten the panel. Turns out all the heat from the window and other switches had embrittled the plastic.

So what to do? For 575M owners, the one thing you want to do so this does not happen to you is to hold the panel in with one finger, while operating the window switches with another finger to keep from putting any stress on the mounting tabs. That should help prevent the problem from occurring.

For the rest of us, though, the damage was already done and the panel needed repairs. Mine was particularly bad, with not only the tabs broken, but one of the plastic bars between the switches gone. It turns out a friend of mine, Jurgen Otto, had the same problem and fixed it with a piece of sheet steel he had formed into a channel that spanned the top of the entire A/C panel. I attacked the problem in a different way, with reinforcing panels for the mounting tabs themselves. Robbie, of Sticky-No-More, came to the rescue and loaned me an A/C panel from a Euro 575M that was damaged, but not destroyed, as my panel was. This allowed me to get some good measurements and make drawings for two types of repair panels, one like Jurgen had used on his car, and two reinforcement panels for those panels where the tabs were still relatively intact. In all honesty, Jurgen's repair is probably the easiest to use, but both are presented here so take your choice.

I repaired Robbie's panel with the two tab reinforcement panels and also made one of Jurgen's repair pieces for my more severely damaged panel. Aaron and John were kind enough to allow me to use their industrial band saw and belt sander to make the repair pieces.

So here is how to repair the panels. Take the attached repair piece images, which are exact size, and glue (do not tape) them to a piece of 0.50 aluminum. Cut out the pieces using a band saw and them sand or file to final shape. At each of the bend mark lines, cut about 1/3 through the inside of the aluminum piece(s) with a triangular file, half round file, or hack saw. Put the aluminum piece in a vice, and make the 90 deg bends. For the two small repair pieces, drill the mount holes before bending. For the large single piece, the holes can be drilled after bending. Clamp both repair piece types securely with wood blocks to prevent the drill press or drill from grabbing the repair piece and jabbing you or bending where you do not want it to bend.

Some hand filing or sanding may be necessary to get a perfect fit. Bend the two arms to get an interference fit, and glue with your favorite epoxy. i used JB Weld, which is long curing, but very tough when completely cured.

Here are images of the damage to Robbie's A/C panel, which is actually in pretty good shape compared to mine, the fitted repair pieces, and templates to be glued to the 0.50" aluminum. I used 5052 aluminum from onlinemetals.com, who sell 12"x12" sheets of aluminum that are perfect for this application. Thanks to Dave (ferraridriver) for pointing me to an excellent source for the metal I needed.

Taz
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File Type: doc Air Conditioning JOtto Repair Panel Template.doc (223.5 KB, 277 views)
File Type: doc Air Conditioning Taz Repair Panels Template.doc (1.89 MB, 289 views)
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